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  • Topic: Modified Emma take II

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    • December 29, 2019 7:57 PM EST
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      Modified Emma take II

      In 2005 the WW&F railway Locomotive #10 went down for a condemned boiler.  We studied it and decided to build a new boiler.  the process is on going taking longer than we had hoped.  too many projects!

      We had decided the new boiler would be built in house and would incorporate changes to improve the locomotive operation and give it a more WW&F family look.  I did a drawing around my drawing of the original configuration and the new boiler.

      I had planned to use an Accucraft Emma to build a model of it as it will be based on this drawing.  I had an Emma sitting on my window sill for quite a while but sold it to a friend to get him into 7/8th scale.  I recently aquired a used Emma from a fellow selling off a live steam collection on MLS. (there is still some good stuff)  rather than let this one collect dust, I dug right in (just in time for the annual MIK's Challenge (oops!)

      I stripped it right down...poor thing!

      Jason at the Train Department had some nice cast wheels that look more appropriate to the engine so I removed the wheels too!

      the stock boiler has fittings in places that do not lend themselves to the plan.  I attacked the boiler too.  I sawed off the stud which holds the tank on (with a screwed on "fill cap")  I unsoldered (silver solder takes some real heat) the fitting for the safety which lined up with the BIG dome on top of the tank.  I made a bronze plug for the old fitting hole and drilled a new hole at the new location.  I decided to use the stub from the tank as a mounting point for the sand dome on the new model.  this photo is before silver soldering the new parts.

      the smoke box  will be replaced to match the larger one planned for WW&F #10...I guess I will just saw off the old leaving enough to attach the new one.  I have sawed out a peice of copper suitable to roll into the new smokebox...more to come

       

      This post was edited by Eric Schade at March 29, 2020 5:42 PM EDT
    • December 29, 2019 8:33 PM EST
      • Kailua, HI
         
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      I like this sentiment:

       

      "I stripped it right down...poor thing!"

       

       

       

      I am glad I am not the only one that ascribes "feelings" to the trains on the shelf!

       

      Looking forward to watching this come together!

       

      Eric

       

    • January 2, 2020 8:10 PM EST
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      Today I wanted to start reassembling stuff...

       

      OK...Smokebox.  As I said I unrolled a piece of 2" copper pipe, fairly heavy wall about 1/16" thick  It took some effort and some heat.  I annealed the copper with my torch...heated it till it nearly glowed.  that softened it enough so I could spread it out by hand (with some effort)  Then I rolled it out onto my cast iron table saw table.  I had to give it what for with a rubber mallet before it really started to look flat.  Mind you this is just raw material at this point.  I laid out the smoke box as a rectangle that would wrap back into a piece of pipe.  it had to come off the raw material the other way because it has to be larger in diameter than the original pipe.  I marked it out and sawed it on the band saw with a wood blade. ( by the way I had carefully used a  fine toothed carbide tipped blade on my table saw to slit the donor pipe open.)

       

      I also drilled holes for the smokestack and rivets.  Drilling large holes in copper can be tricky ... I actually made a second try for my smoke box after screwing up the first ... and it biting me on the hand!  The second one got sandwiched between two pine boards clamped securely.  I transferred the location of the smokebox hole onto one of the boards.  then clamped the works into my drill press vise and drilled with my 1/2" drill bit (feeding slowly).  worked great!  I then drilled my  rivet holes with a 1/16" drill bit using center punched starting holes.  I busted a 1/16" drill bit in this process, though my little drill press mostly did a good job.  I then wrapped the copper back into a smoke box sized pipe.  I used a heavy piece of pipe as an anvil and my trusty ball peen hammer to form it to shape.  I did re-anneal the copper once during this operation so it would form more easily and smoothly. once round and smooth with the ends bent back until they touched neatly, I silver soldered the joint to keep it honest.  i touched up the shape a little and tried its fit against Emma's boiler. 

       

      Once satisfied I added some rivet detail.  Escutcheon pins driven into the holes from the outside look about right, in this case about 1/8" diameter nearly spherical shape.  I clipped the pin flush(ish) with the inside of the smokebox and gave the pin a few whacks with the ball peen hammer to swell the inside end so it stays secure.

      I also reassembled the Chassis.  Jason's new cast wheels look great with a nice new coat of black paint.  I had to scavenge the short crank pins from the old wheel set to use on the new front axle.  I had to drill out the threaded hole large enough to press the old crank pins into.  now I could use the original hex headed screws to retain the side rods.  Reassembling the wheel sets is fiddly, but Jason's use of square ended axles and screws to retain the wheels is much easier than manually quartering the wheels and pressing them onto the axles.

      the rear truck was a job in itself.

       

      As this is actually the second Modified Emma I am working on (third or forth if you count the ones I made parts for) I already had Cut files for my CNC milling machine.  So I set things up again, It has actually been quite a while since I used this machine so it took some study and trial and error to get back into the swing of making stuff.  I have new clamping bits which are much better than what I had used in the past.  I had some 1/8" end mills in the drawer on unknown quality.  I used em and broke two of the three before i was done.  they probably were not really sharp and I probably dont have the cutting feed rate and tool speed, nor the proper cut depth either but all is well. 

       

      the final product needed some deburring and cleanup with a file.

      I had some nicely sized wheels in my bin...always gotta have a bin!

      I drilled and tapped some holes and inserted some 1-72 hex head screws to hold the works together.

      well that is enough for today!

       

      This post was edited by Eric Schade at March 29, 2020 5:44 PM EDT
    • January 2, 2020 8:47 PM EST

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      How do you plan on hiding the pull string when finished and running like Shawn does  ?

    • January 2, 2020 9:23 PM EST
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      I am a hands and knees train pusher type...no strings attatched!

    • March 19, 2020 8:46 PM EDT
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      I have changed tacks on this project and will have some photos to share soon.  I think it will be pretty cool, i am more excited than i was building another Forney.

    • March 19, 2020 9:25 PM EDT
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      I got a couple of good photos...

      and a front view

      This is the same engine.  i made another new smoke box which is smaller than the original boiler and longer to more or less match the SD Warren #2 Baldwin at the Boothbay Railway Village

      I had made a taller smokebox saddle for the Forney version so I cut it down for this one.  the SD Warren engine boiler is quite low.  My model is still a bit high but lower than the Emma.  I may cut it down lower yet.

       

    • March 19, 2020 10:09 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Eric,

       

      really you must stop. I am going to recommend to BD that you have your account suspended. You are single handedly the reason I have fallen in love with small locomotives. I used to like things like a Big Boy or a Connie. About the smallest thing I ever considered liking was a 2-6-0 and only from a historical stand point. I liked big iron. And then I came here to LSC and started seeing the diminutive locos you model and play with in 1:1 and Now I consider a 2-6-0 a giant. Everytime you post I want to start a new loco

      ____________________________________
    • March 20, 2020 11:45 AM EDT
      • Ormond Beach, Fl. 32174
         
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      Eric, what a nice little engine, beautiful job I'm with Devon I like small engines the back bone of the railroads, Thanks for the share, Bill

    • March 20, 2020 9:28 PM EDT
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      I volunteer at a two foot gauge railway which is nothing but small stuff.  This is the smallest of all the historic two foot gauge stuff in maine.  Even the smallest standard gauge loco looks big to me!  Small is beautiful!

    • March 20, 2020 11:45 PM EDT
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      I agree Eric. You have turned me into a fan. 

      ____________________________________
    • March 29, 2020 4:38 PM EDT
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      I guess I have about finished this project, here is a builder's portrait:

      years ago, I had modified an Accucraft Ruby based on the same prototype.

    • March 29, 2020 5:17 PM EDT
      • Not one of the WannaBe's,
         
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      Nice pairing Eric.

    • March 29, 2020 8:16 PM EDT
      • Kailua, HI
         
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      You are welcome to bring either to Hawai'i anytime!  Wonderful, wonderful build!

    • March 29, 2020 8:45 PM EDT
      • Phippsburg, Maine
         
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      They would each make fine sugar plantation engines no doubt...and wouldnt mind some nice weather!

    • March 29, 2020 9:36 PM EDT
      • Missouri, It's like Floodsburg, man
         
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      I like the green.

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