Forums Modeling Other Scales
  • Topic: Trying to figure out the Scale?

    Back To Topics
    (0 rates)
    • April 9, 2019 8:20 AM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
      • Posts
        8,910
      • Thanks
        279
      • Thanked
        306

      Trying to figure out the Scale?

      So I've got this generically built, vertical boiler steam engine, that is gauged to ruin on 7.5 inch track.  Its big, so I think its bigger than 1.5 inch or 1.6 inch Scale.  Trying to figure out the scale.  Thought I could do it by comparing it to an LGB Steam Dummy or Tram, but now not feeling quite so sure of that.  The spoked wheels are 7 inches in diameter, so maybe that would be the key.

      .

      Opinions?

    • April 9, 2019 8:45 AM EDT
      • Burke, Virginia
         
      • Posts
        7,177
      • Thanks
        177
      • Thanked
        630

      Ric Golding said:

      So I've got this generically built, vertical boiler steam engine, that is gauged to ruin on 7.5 inch track.  Its big, so I think its bigger than 1.5 inch or 1.6 inch Scale.  Trying to figure out the scale.  Thought I could do it by comparing it to an LGB Steam Dummy or Tram, but now not feeling quite so sure of that.  The spoked wheels are 7 inches in diameter, so maybe that would be the key.

      .

      Opinions?

      Does it matter?  Are you going to be putting a scale figure on it, or is this just to answer the inevitable "What scale is it?" question?   If the latter, than I would follow your past procedure of just making up a scale that sounds plausible.

      This post was edited by Bruce D. Chandler at April 9, 2019 8:47 AM EDT
      ____________________________________

      Bruce

      http://jbrr.com/

       

    • April 9, 2019 10:02 AM EDT
      • Sylvester, Ga
         
      • Posts
        470
      • Thanks
        8
      • Thanked
        23

      Use a rubber ruler..... :)

       

      going back to my corner

    • April 9, 2019 10:48 AM EDT
      • Chaco, Paraguay
         
      • Posts
        2,567
      • Thanks
        196
      • Thanked
        216

      if it is standard gauge, i would say it should be about 1:7.5 scale.

       

      (standard gauge divided by your models gauge)

      (Barbies are about 1:6)

      ____________________________________

       

      My Chaosplace ->  

    • April 9, 2019 12:16 PM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
      • Posts
        8,910
      • Thanks
        279
      • Thanked
        306

      Gentlemen, thanks for the time to write something.

      .

      Rubber ruler?  Of course.

      .

      Gauge to Prototype?  That may be the rub.  It sits on axles 7.5 inches wide.  But much like many prototype pieces of equipment, if you put narrow gauge trucks under it, it looks big.  In the 1:20.3 model world, think of the Bachmann 45 Tonner.  It looks big and becomes your movable width and height gauge.  

      .

      Why bother?  Because it will be asked.  It is 1.5" or 2" to the foot and some gear purchased will vary as to which size I declare it.  Of the standard engines, they are usually built to 1.5" to a foot or 1.6.  However, there are many that are 2, 2.5, 3 and even some 3.5" to a foot.

      .

      Basic dimensions are 46" long x 16 " x 24" tall, boiler, stack and a few appliances are taller.  As I said it sits on 7" diameter, spoked wheels.

      .

      Korm, did your 1:7.5 came from dividing 56.5 inches (standard track width) divided by 7.5 inches? Or what?  I appreciate the Barbie reference of 1.6.   So using that , it would be 28.75' long x 15' tall and 10 ' wide.  I guess that doesn't sound too bad.

      So in 1.6, it would be 23' long x 8' wide x 12' tall.

      In 1.5, it would be 19' x 6.6' x 10'.

      .

      Like using Pete's Steam Dummy, I'm working on getting dimensions from an old Roundhouse Box Cab and a custom IT Class A.

      .

      Oh the pain of the grey matter.

       

       

       

    • April 9, 2019 12:18 PM EDT
      • Fort Myers Beach & Annapolis, Florida & Maryland
         
      • Posts
        1,951
      • Thanks
        45
      • Thanked
        229

      Ric, those engines came in all sorts of sizes, but had to fit under the bridges!  I was surprised to see how small the Regner "Chaloner" prototype is (see pic attached. And note the driver standing on a plate on the side.) So find a doll/figure that is as tall as the stack and that will give you a relative size?

       

      This post was edited by Pete Thornton at April 10, 2019 10:26 PM EDT
      ____________________________________

       

        Pete

    • April 9, 2019 1:21 PM EDT
      • Burke, Virginia
         
      • Posts
        7,177
      • Thanks
        177
      • Thanked
        630

      2.173" to the foot then...

      ____________________________________

      Bruce

      http://jbrr.com/

       

    • April 9, 2019 8:43 PM EDT
      • Chaco, Paraguay
         
      • Posts
        2,567
      • Thanks
        196
      • Thanked
        216

      Ric,

      being from the metric world, i took your numbers, roughly translated them into mm, then did the math.

      45mm times 32 is 1440mm that divided by 190mm (7.5" x 25.4) is the scale  1:7.57

       

      (if you think about 50 years back, there were "Big Jim" action figures, that were about 1:7.5)

       

      the 7" wheels point as well to 1:7.5 or 1:7 scale.

      but if you say, the loco is about 16" wide, it has the same relation between gauge width and cabin width, as the LGBs have.

      that would make it a narrow gauge loco in (estimated guess) about 1:5 scale.

      in both cases, rob your grandchilds of two barbies, have your wife sew some engineer and fireman clothes - and your loco and crew will fit more or less together.

      to the questions which scale it is, just answer: "Barbie scale!"

      ____________________________________

       

      My Chaosplace ->  

    • April 9, 2019 10:30 PM EDT
      • Sacramento, California
         
      • Posts
        76
      • Thanks
        48
      • Thanked
        34

      Korm Kormsen said:
       rob your grandchilds of two barbies, have your wife sew some engineer and fireman clothes - and your loco and crew will fit more or less together.

      to the questions which scale it is, just answer: "Barbie scale!"

       

      Come on guys, let's use GI Joes.

      Back when these were actually used on the tracks, I don't think women drove them.

       

      Just sayin.

       

      Adam

    • April 10, 2019 5:58 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
      • Posts
        10,445
      • Thanks
        91
      • Thanked
        705

      I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok.....

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • April 10, 2019 9:46 AM EDT
      • Burke, Virginia
         
      • Posts
        7,177
      • Thanks
        177
      • Thanked
        630

      David Maynard said:

      I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok.....

       

      ____________________________________

      Bruce

      http://jbrr.com/

       

    • April 10, 2019 9:46 AM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
      • Posts
        8,910
      • Thanks
        279
      • Thanked
        306

      It really doesn't matter about the scale, but it is intriguing and a great brain twister.

      David - Not sure where being a lumberjack fits in to this.  That one went over my head and needs a whole explanation by itself.

      Adam, Pete, Bruce and Korm - Pete's picture really brings out the questions and puts it in perspective, because if the wheels are 7 inches and the dimension to the boiler is the crux of the question with the top of the stack being 36 inches, the diameter of the boiler being 10 inches on the outside and the firebox door being almost 3 inches.  With the gauge of the track being 7.5 inches and the width of the engine being 16 inches, that's an overhang of 8.5 inches or 4.25 on each side.  That would definetly be a small industrial engine like in Pete's picture, with the stack hardly being taller than the operator, if that tall.  So "Barbie scale" would be too small.  With this info, 3.5 inches to a foot does not seem out of line.

      The engine has been in a great deal of disassembly over the last couple of months, so pictures are hardly worth showing.  I'm currently getting it reassembled and within the next couple of days, I'll try to get a picture posted.  Then we can really compare it to Pete's picture and give this discussion some illustration.

      Thank y'all for your input and dedication of grey matter to my thoughts, concerns, problems and trivial questions.  It does help me imagine what I'm working on.

    • April 10, 2019 10:12 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
      • Posts
        4,246
      • Thanks
        1,217
      • Thanked
        440

      David Maynard said:

      I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok.....

      I have a Parrot that says/sings that … But ...  will not sing the rest... 

       

      ____________________________________

       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • April 10, 2019 10:13 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
      • Posts
        4,246
      • Thanks
        1,217
      • Thanked
        440

      Ric

      I'm having a hard time see the pic of said engine..

      ____________________________________

       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • April 10, 2019 2:53 PM EDT
      • Fort Myers Beach & Annapolis, Florida & Maryland
         
      • Posts
        1,951
      • Thanks
        45
      • Thanked
        229

      I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok.....

      I don't know how that got in either.  The locos are Taffy and Chaloner!

      Sean McGillicuddy said:

      Ric

      I'm having a hard time see the pic of said engine..

      Here you go, and a few extras.

       

      Taffy & Chaloner at Wicksteed Park, 2007.

       

      Restored Head Wrightson locomotive: 1871, known as Coffeepot No 1.

       

      Vertical boiler locomotive 'Paddy' at Porthmadog

       

      There are 2 extant locos in the B&O RR Museum in Baltimore looking like this:

       

      And also Tom Thumb:

       

      I tried to post photos that include the engineer.  Clearly some locos (especially in the USA) have boilers as tall as the eng.  Others are shorter. 

      This post was edited by Pete Thornton at April 10, 2019 2:54 PM EDT
      ____________________________________

       

        Pete

    • April 10, 2019 8:20 PM EDT
      • Defending the State of Exile! ,
         
      • Posts
        13,341
      • Thanks
        1,524
      • Thanked
        1,011

      Ric Golding said:

      Gentlemen, thanks for the time to write something.

      .

      Rubber ruler?  Of course.

      .

      Gauge to Prototype?  That may be the rub.  It sits on axles 7.5 inches wide.  But much like many prototype pieces of equipment, if you put narrow gauge trucks under it, it looks big.  In the 1:20.3 model world, think of the Bachmann 45 Tonner.  It looks big and becomes your movable width and height gauge.  

      .

      Why bother?  Because it will be asked.  It is 1.5" or 2" to the foot and some gear purchased will vary as to which size I declare it.  Of the standard engines, they are usually built to 1.5" to a foot or 1.6.  However, there are many that are 2, 2.5, 3 and even some 3.5" to a foot.


       

       

       

      Just went through the same issue with the static model of CVRR electric motor car. However I'm a Rooster and model by eye where scale and gauge matter not! Didn't seem to matter during the time of Tom Thumb so why does it matter now? Lincolns Funeral Car was built with extra wide wheels so it could travel over the rails that were already laid? Speaking of laid ....ahhh never mind were not going there but you could call it Golding scale if you prefer.  https://railroad.lindahall.org/essays/rails-guage.html

      As I see it your locomotive your rules "ESPECIALLY" when your playing with stuff like Pete showed.....From a ROOSTERS research there is NO real rules only able to run on the track that is already "LAID"

    • April 11, 2019 6:35 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
      • Posts
        10,445
      • Thanks
        91
      • Thanked
        705

      Sorry, but when the talk went to Barbies, I remember Boyd saying that he had made clothes for his Barbies, and for his GI Joe action figures. I joked with him that he put the same clothes on both, and that Joe wasn't happy in a sun dress......

       

      Why did Boyd buy abused and naked Barbies at yard sales, he never did say.

       

      Sorry, but my feeble and twisted mind went off on a sidetrack there, and all I heard was the lumberjack song. Females may not have driven them things way back then, but we don't know if any of the guys who drove them
      "put on women's clothing and hang around in bars".....

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • April 11, 2019 7:46 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
      • Posts
        4,246
      • Thanks
        1,217
      • Thanked
        440

      Pete Thornton said:
      Sean McGillicuddy said:

      Ric

      I'm having a hard time see the pic of said engine..

      Here you go, and a few extras.

      So which one is Rics ?

      This post was edited by Sean McGillicuddy at April 11, 2019 7:47 AM EDT
      ____________________________________

       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • April 11, 2019 10:07 AM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
      • Posts
        8,910
      • Thanks
        279
      • Thanked
        306

      Wow!  More great pictures! 

      For me the guiding dimensions are the fire box door at a 2.5 inch hole and a 3 inch door.  And the top of the stack being 36 inches above the rail.

    • April 11, 2019 10:19 AM EDT
      • Southern Illinois
         
      • Posts
        8,910
      • Thanks
        279
      • Thanked
        306

      Got some more information on dimensions provided by a friend in HO.

      .

      Box Cab

      2 axle 17' between the hub centers

      29' long

      17' wide

      13' high

      .

      Steeple Cab

      24' long

      10' wide

      13' tall

      .

      ITS Class A Steeple Cab

      28' long

      9' wide

      13' tall

      .

      Remember my unit is

      46 inches long

      16 inches wide

      26 inches to top of boiler

      36 inches to top of stack

      .

      Just more fodder to the mix.

       

       

       

Forums Modeling Other Scales

    Icon Legend

  • Topic has replies
    Hot topic
    Topic unread
    Topic doesn't have any replies
    Closed topic
    BBCode  is enabled
    HTML  is enabled

Add Reputation

Do you want to add reputation for this user by this post?

or cancel

Ads by Google