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    • April 22, 2020 11:47 PM EDT
    • Apparently we need more details to spark our memories.

      Do you have a name for what you have, who made your trolley?

      That truck doesn't look sturdy enough to handle torque, but that's my opinion.

      Bachmann may have a powered axle you can hide within, search their parts catalog, G section (large scale), loco parts or trolley, rail car parts

       

      https://estore.bachmanntrains.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=66

       

      They are out of many items, but maybe you'll find something to make do, until knowledgeable folks give you real answers. 

      Good luck and stay healthy

    • April 22, 2020 8:11 PM EDT
    • Hello everyone :

      I hope I'm in the right forum. I want to replace this truck with a power truck and I hope you guy's will help me . I just got a 1.24 scale trolley model and I want to power it. The height is 45 mm from rail and the length is 60 mm between the axles. I can't find any specs on line and I'm hoping you guy's can help me find one. I would also like a second unpowered truck if possible. Any leads would be really helpful.

      Thanks everyone

      Bob   

    • April 22, 2020 11:35 PM EDT
    • Yea, Rust-Oleum paints, in my opinion, are pretty crappy for model work especially the 2X stuff.  Sure it works great on Patio furniture but puts out way too much paint for model work. Kyrlon is not any better in there 2X spray, again just too much paint coming out of the nozzle for model work.  I have been moving toward cheap store brands, because they skimp on the paint pigment and you get a finer/lighter coat of paint.

      If it says wait 48 hours before re-coat then wait 48 hours, better yet wait 60 hours depending on temp and humidity.

      I have almost given up on Ripoff-Oleums paints.  In the past couple of years I have probably returned 20 cans to Home Depot because they quit spraying after a single use and sit on the shelf for a month or two.  Yes, I know how to clear the nozzle and pull it off and soak in solvent to unplug it, but why in hell should I have to do that.  When I buy a can of paint I mark it with the date so I know how old the paint is.  I have some cheap hardware store brands in the cabinet that are 6-7 years old and still work fine.  

       

      The exception to my dislike of their paints is the automotive primers.  They go on smooth and dry exceptionally fast and can be top coated within 15 minutes even in high humidity conditions and the damn nozzles don't clog up.

       

      Doubt if this helped you much but it let me unload on something that has been p-----g me off for a long while.

    • April 22, 2020 10:57 PM EDT
    • I have purchase 2 spray pack cans of Rust-Oleum 2X paint to use on a bash that I am doing.

      I sprayed the first coat and then waited for 24 hours before spraying the second coat but when I did the paint crinkled and looked like it had been put in paint stripper.

      I washed what I was spraying with mineral turpentine and then with soap and water which I let dry thoroughly (all day sitting in the sun) then sprayed it the next morning.

      The can mentions either respraying within 1 hour or waiting for 48 hours before applying a clear coat but nothing about just re coating.

      Has anybody else come across this problem or am I doing something wrong?

    • April 22, 2020 10:55 AM EDT
    • David Maynard said:

      Sorry John. I wasn't trying to make anyone quit. I didn't intend to frustrate anyone. I was just trying to offer a useful trick that I use. But you know, thread drift, and other factors, sometimes make me regret trying.

      I only meant adding to this list.

      As a bench jeweler, we favored the blue wheels because they polish prong settings nicely and don't leave scratches (on the stones)

      i saw no need to go backwards to a 'crude' (say 50 years since introduction) bright boy, when tarnish is an easy  foe.

      That's all ... 

    • April 22, 2020 9:59 AM EDT
    • John Caughey said:
      Bill Barnwell said:

      Yep, but everything scratches even polishing compound, it's the size of the scratch that matters

       

      Yup, so why not go finer?

      That is the trick

      Eve Square Edge Pumice Wheels 22 x 3mm High Luster Polishing Wheel ...

      High luster polish wheels....

       

    • April 22, 2020 8:13 AM EDT
    • Sorry John. I wasn't trying to make anyone quit. I didn't intend to frustrate anyone. I was just trying to offer a useful trick that I use. But you know, thread drift, and other factors, sometimes make me regret trying.

    • April 21, 2020 8:24 PM EDT
    • David Maynard said:

      John, I wasn't initially talking about track. And HO track that the clubs use is nickle silver.

       

      -snip-

      Nobody was, you had a chemical cleaner, catsup. 

      Somebody suggested the Bright boy.

      I objected to scratches to remove oxidation.

      Captain Obvious said everything scratches ...but

      Those blue silicone pumice wheels polish without scratching ....

      Just a suggestion, then you mentioned aches and pains ... I quit.

    • April 21, 2020 6:59 PM EDT
    • John, I wasn't initially talking about track. And HO track that the clubs use is nickle silver.

       

      Rick, I clean my gauge one track with a drywall sander pole, with a rag on it dampened with water and a touch of Dawn dish soap. My gauge one track is stainless steel. I don't think an LGB pad would be easy to use on HO track.

    • April 21, 2020 10:24 AM EDT
    • How about a bigger "Bright Boy"  that would be easier to hold.  On the large scale stuff, the LGB track cleaning pad works great!  Get one of those and cut it in half.

    • April 21, 2020 9:30 AM EDT
    • At the time nobody was talking track and as a battery guy I never think of track cleaning ....

    • April 21, 2020 8:25 AM EDT
    • John, why not? Um, I just want to clean track on the clubs' set up, so I just use the brite boy. I don't need to go for a mirror finish on the rails. And I just want to de-tarnish the brass parts on my locomotives, so I use ketchup. Both are the easier and less expensive option for me.

    • April 20, 2020 10:41 PM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      Yep, but everything scratches even polishing compound, it's the size of the scratch that matters

       

      Yup, so why not go finer?

      Eve Square Edge Pumice Wheels 22 x 3mm High Luster Polishing Wheel ...

      High luster polish wheels....

    • April 20, 2020 9:25 PM EDT
    • Bill, maybe if I soaked the brass in Katsup for a long time, that would be true. But I haven't seen the brass turn a copper colour the way I use it.

    • April 21, 2020 2:03 PM EDT
    • I have a multimeter but don't know the ins and outs of it.  What exactly do I need to set it to and what am I looking for?

      As we are on a roll, here's the scoop. The multimeter can read ohms, a measure of connectivity. If you turn the dial to 10 ohms, (or 20, or whatever ohms it has,) and touch the probes together, it will read 0 ohms (zero). (Mine reads -1 if the probes aren't touching anything.) So if you touch the wheels on opposite sides they connect through the motor (if all is well) and the meter will not read 0.  If there is a short-circuit, then it will read 0.

      The advantage of using a meter is that you can touch the various parts, like the wheel and a connecting rod, to confirm they are connected and conducting (they should be) and you can test various other places to see what happens.

      https://randomnerdtutorials.com/how-to-use-a-multimeter/

       

    • April 21, 2020 1:39 PM EDT
    • I had these (whatever they are called) switched to the wrong side when I put everything back together.

      They are called bearing blocks, or hornblocks. They slide up and down in a slot in the frame and hold the axles in the right place. On top is a spring that helps the wheel drop into a low point on the track to keep all 4 wheels in contact.

      And yes, you do have to get them back in the same side they were when you started.  With the springs in place.

       

      For background, let me offer a quick dissertation on bearing springs. There are 2 schools of thought in our model world: either put in weak springs and let the bearing blocks ride at the top of the chassis/frame slot, or put in strong springs so the bearing block does not hit the top of the slot and rides on the springs. The former is easier to make and works by forcing that side of the axle to drop when necessary due to rough track. The second version is more prototypical and theoretically better, but it is much more difficult to get the right size springs so they actually work. I think Bachmann's are the first kind - they are basically compressed when the weight of the loco is on them on flat, level track.

      http://www.clag.org.uk/41-0rev.html#section8.3

      From "The principles of model locomotive suspension" http://www.clag.org.uk/41-0rev.html  Well worth reading, even though it is written for a smaller scale, it applies to our large stuff too.

       

      This is an Ozark wheel support with a very strong spring (from my little caboose project.) When it hits a bump, both wheels go up as the springs are too stiff.

    • April 21, 2020 1:30 PM EDT
    • I guess I don't understand what is meant by a "D" profile.  The new ones from Bachmann look to me to be the same as the ones I removed.  Here is a pic of the axels I removed.

      The "D" means there is a flat part (hence "D" instead of "O".) On your original axles, you have a flat part both ends of the axle to take the valve gear. The new one from Bachmann has a flat on one side that continues all the way through the gear to the other side.  So if you took the gear off the new axle and looked at it from the side, you'd see a "D" shaped hole.  Here's the pic of the one I got for my 4-4-0, which clearly shows the "D" shaped hole.

       

       

      Now we've cleared that up, on to the short circuit. . .

    • April 20, 2020 6:13 PM EDT
    • Those Springs are to be inserted between the "Bearing Blocks" shown in that previous picture, and the frame. They are what gives the "Spring action" on each axle...

          This whole "Fiasco" you have been going through proves that it pays to take great care when dis-assembling a well built locomotive, or for that mater; any piece of equipment.

            My complements on your getting through it so well.

        Fred Mills

            PS; you can see the small hole on the top end of the bearing block, in the picture. Insert one spring in it when putting the bearing block into the frame. There should be a spring in every bearing block.....

    • April 20, 2020 5:06 PM EDT
    • Only one item left to wrap up this loco.  When taking things apart these 2 very tiny springs fell out from someplace.  Any idea as to where these go?

    • April 20, 2020 5:01 PM EDT
    • I figured it out and solved the issue.  My bad!  I had these (whatever they are called) switched to the wrong side when I put everything back together.