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    • June 10, 2020 8:29 PM EDT
    • "Paint is an art" - You sure got that right.  I started in the late 60's as a teenager painting cars in an oil change bay of a Texaco station near Buffalo, NY. My boss was a real hack and he loved enamel auto paint. My first spray job was a "Rangoon Red" mustang and half way through the side panels it began to run. My boss said "just keep laying it on until it's all one big run". I did and it sagged like crazy right off the bottom of the rocker panels. Boss said "no worries, when it dries we'll cut it off" and by gum, we did

       

      I was a Krylon fan for years and I prefer even the newer formula Krylon over other brands, but I've not tried them all.  Years ago my mentor at work brought in his High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) spray system.  His gun was buggered, but it was easy to use when it worked. I convinced my boss to purchase an Earlex HVLP system and have been using it for 3 or 4 years now and love it. It will spray acrylics, but I much prefer oil based paints for the finer droplets and ease of clean up. Paint thinner works MUCH better on oil based paint than soap & water on acrylics.

       

      Oil based paints are hard to find, but still out there. My preferred oil based paint is Rustoleum. Many of their colors can be thinned with Acetone for a nice quick flash time. If it doesn't say on the label to use Acetone, I thin with VM&P Naptha which flashes faster then generic paint thinner. I can't get pure Mineral Spirits any more, only Paint Thinner made with mineral spirits & who knows what else.  I do wear a professional NOSH Respirator when painting using anything other than water based acrylics.

       

      And after over 50 years, I still consider myself an amateur.

    • June 10, 2020 7:46 PM EDT
    • John Lenheiser said:

       I'm a retired body shop mgr. for a large DFW auto dealer and after 35 at one dealership I have a good idea on painting. Remember, paint is an art and you learn from experience, if I cab answer any question, I would be glad to help with your painting needs. 

      trainman

      Yes,  Paint is an art ....can you explain why scale coat (rattle cans)  cure in the cold but not the heat?  I learned from experience on that one!

    • June 10, 2020 4:25 PM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      ... My preferred paint is Krylon being as it is fast drying, virtually  run free, and a plethora of colors available, found to spray very even and with a good mist spray, ... 

       

        

       

       

    • June 10, 2020 12:22 PM EDT
    •   Although not having the advantage of having been an auto body shop manager I have been modeling for over 65 years and mostly use rattle cans. When I started pretty much all that was available was Testors small glass bottles and paint brushes but for plastic models and HO trains it worked great of course that was back when I had steady hands and all the time in the world. Moving on trains got bigger and time became valuable so hence rattle cans came into my life. My preferred paint is Krylon being as it is fast drying, virtually  run free, and a plethora of colors available, found to spray very even and with a good mist spray, just remember I'm speaking of yesterday's paint as they too have changed to meet the new day. Most paints now come with primer in them which is not ideal for models as it makes the paint thicker and hides detail. Also most spray cans have changed their form of paint pick up so one can not turn the can upside down and spray to clear the nozzle, often winds up with a half full can becoming useless. I have found that rustoleum to be thick, sprays like a fire hose and runs easily, Ace seems to be better and supposedly made by Krylon, Lowes was carrying a Valspar ultra mist that was very good but lately have been unable to find. You can find some great spray cans at automotive supply shops but most are lacquer base which reacts with plastic and usually come in small cans. I have used air brushes before but now pretty much just weather with it being as my hands are no longer rock steady. Important things I have found in my journey is don't spray lacquer base over oil base, if it says wait 2 days between coats, do so, don't use paint with primer included and never paint on a humid day, and light coats are better than heavy ones, just my thoughts, Bill  

    • June 10, 2020 2:18 AM EDT
    • Being a model railroader for some 30 plus years I have always used enamel or lacquer paints, mainly Scale Coat, or Floquil. These paint companies have gone out of business in the past years, mainly due to EPA rules and regulations. Water base paints for models is pretty much junk and just don't give the finish I want on my models. Today I still spray many of my models with enamel/lacquer paints and use an airbrush, but these paints are getting harder to find as the EPA is also having Testors and other paint manufactures due away with these paints. One paint I have been using is the Model Masters by Testors in the spray can, sold at Hobby Lobby and hobby shop, sells for around $6.00 per can, these paint spray very well and one can is enough for one engine, or rolling stock. I also use the paint sold at auto parts stores, but most colors are going to be colors for autos, these paints do also spray very well out of the can. I'm also using the Krylon from Home Depot, the cheap stuff, not the higher price cans for outside use, or special use, remember were painting plastic train engines here, not outdoor furniture, I do use the Krylon primers with good results. I would like to say one thing here, I feel many are painting their engine, etc. wrong when it comes to coats of paint, I usually primer my engines, parts, etc. to be painted, but not always is primer needed, many times I paint right on the plastic parts, yes you should test the paint on another plastic part, or on an underside and make sure it will not craze the plastic. Next I do tape off each color to be painted, this way I'm not adding too much paint to the model, too much paint is just looking for a cracking, or crazing problem, plus too much paint hides detail. Last I would like to say about coats of paint, what's with paint one day with first coats and then a second day with more paint, do you think you get a better job, no you just get more build up with paint that is not need, there are models, not your patio chairs. Here is how I apply paint, I spray a light cover coat on the model and let set for a minute or two, look at how it covered, yes it will have thin sports, I now apply the second coat, a little wetter then the first coat, let it set for another two, or three minutes and look at the model in sunlight, I do paint outside most of the time on non winds days. At this point I am either happy with the coverage, or it gets another coat, most of the time I have got it covered in two coats. If your waiting for the first coat to dry and then repainting, your just adding paint that is not needed and covering up detail, I can tell you, more paint is not better. This way all my coats of paint are drying all at one time and the paint shrinks as it would in one drying coat. I don't know everything about painting models, but painting model for 30 plus years I got a pretty good idea of what works and how to get the best job I can and having to redue a paint job is no fun. I'm a retired body shop mgr. for a large DFW auto dealer and after 35 at one dealership I have a good idea on painting. Remember, paint is an art and you learn from experience, if I cab answer any question, I would be glad to help with your painting needs. 

      trainman

    • May 28, 2020 1:28 PM EDT
    • Dave Meashey said:

      John;

       

      I think the Pike's Peak rack locomotives were a form of Vauclain compound.  (Named for Samuel Vauclain, the chief design engineer for Baldwin Locomotive Works around the turn of the 20th century.)  The low pressure cylinder was mounted above the high pressure cylinder, and the valve chest was behind those two.  Vauclain compounds were high maintenance machines, and somewhat finnicky runners.  The system may have worked acceptably for rack operations, as there was very little speed involved.

       

      Best Wishes, David Meashey 

      You are correct. 

    • May 28, 2020 9:46 AM EDT
    •  

       

      The number on the motor block 22460 designated this one.

       

       

    • May 28, 2020 8:18 AM EDT
    • Thanks all for the help.  The knowledge base here is fantastic.  The loco was indeed built by George Konrad and I have been in contact with him.  The loco has a single cog wheel.

       

      George built 5 of these locomotives,  Four of which were were a basic detail and one (this one) had a lot more detail in the number of cylinders an other items.

       

      It is indeed a model of a Pikes Peak locomotive and used a stock LGB model as its starting point,

       

      Anyone have an idea of the LGB model used as the starting point?

       

      Thanks

       

      Stan

       

       

       

       

    • May 28, 2020 7:20 AM EDT
    • A friend of mine had a custom modified LGB COG loco and he mentioned that there were 3 custom mods made by the person he bought this from.  That was over 15 years ago.

       

    • May 27, 2020 7:48 PM EDT
    • Stanley Ames said:

      Next mystery is trying to figure out the identity of this LGB Rack loco,

       

      I think it is a model of a Pikes Peak cog loco.  Most Mt Washington cog locos have a tender.

       

      The mechanism is LGB and I suspect most of the parts are as well.

       

      It is reported to have been custom built but from what.

       

      Stan

       

      Does it have a single cog wheel under the loco?

      Most likely the mechanism is from LGB's first cog locomotive available circa 1985.

      I am pretty sure this was custom built by New Hampshire Garden Railway member George Konrad.

      I first saw it or a VERY similar one at a nursery in the southeast of Boston.

      One of the members of the NHGRS might know how to contact him in his new location in California.

      I had some pictures but they are on some old hard drive somewhere.

      Pictures were from around turn of the century:-(

    • May 27, 2020 5:17 PM EDT
    • John;

       

      I think the Pike's Peak rack locomotives were a form of Vauclain compound.  (Named for Samuel Vauclain, the chief design engineer for Baldwin Locomotive Works around the turn of the 20th century.)  The low pressure cylinder was mounted above the high pressure cylinder, and the valve chest was behind those two.  Vauclain compounds were high maintenance machines, and somewhat finnicky runners.  The system may have worked acceptably for rack operations, as there was very little speed involved.

       

      Best Wishes, David Meashey 

    • May 27, 2020 12:57 PM EDT
    • I find the cylinder choice odd, appears to be running off the valve chest... but then again...

      Manitou and Pike's Peak Railway 1891-2016: 125 years on the Peak ...

      Toys & Hobbies CD Picture Disc of Manitou & Pikes Peak Cog Railway ...

    • May 27, 2020 11:27 AM EDT
    • Thanks for all the help on the boxcar

       

      Next mystery is trying to figure out the identity of this LGB Rack loco,

       

      I think it is a model of a Pikes Peak cog loco.  Most Mt Washington cog locos have a tender.

       

      The mechanism is LGB and I suspect most of the parts are as well.

       

      It is reported to have been custom built but from what.

       

      Stan

       

    • May 26, 2020 10:16 AM EDT
    • Stan,

      What on Earth happened to you on May 16th? Did you get hit on the coconut by a meteor?

    • May 17, 2020 1:06 PM EDT
    • Stan,

      Defiantly Hartford no question. looks to be in good condition. do you want to swap for an Accucraft one? it even has the right couplers on it.

       

      Al P.

    • May 17, 2020 10:52 AM EDT
    • Stanley Ames said:

      . . .

      I have attached 2 photos.  In looking closely at the trucks they do not appear to be Accucraft trucks because they have a slotted screw holding the sideframes and the brake rigging is much different.

       

      If these are Hartford trucks that would solve the cars identity.

      Stan 

      Stan, I have attached 3 photos from the Hartford calalog. Their boxcar, the underside of the caboose (sure looks like your trucks!) and the D&RGW 3' 7" truck. It might give you some details.

       

      A thought! Scrape the back of a truck sideframe. Hartford are white metal. Accucraft trucks are brass.

    • May 17, 2020 8:39 AM EDT
    • Stanley Ames said:

      Thanks for all who have provided thoughts.  I also apologize for the 4 posts.  I have no idea how this happened.

      I have attached 2 photos.  In looking closely at the trucks they do not appear to be Accucraft trucks because they have a slotted screw holding the sideframes and the brake rigging is much different.

      If these are Hartford trucks that would solve the cars identity.

      Stan 

      I was shortchanged!  I only got to see ONE post.     

      I'm thinking Hartford, but I don't have ANY Hartford trucks to go by.  (I could NEVER get them to assemble correctly and then Rodney offered some that were so much better!).  The under body sure looks like it could be Hartford, but the only Hartford kit I ever built was the caboose - yet it just has that same sort of look.

       

    • May 17, 2020 7:28 AM EDT
    • Thanks for all who have provided thoughts.  I also apologize for the 4 posts.  I have no idea how this happened.

       

      I have attached 2 photos.  In looking closely at the trucks they do not appear to be Accucraft trucks because they have a slotted screw holding the sideframes and the brake rigging is much different.

       

      If these are Hartford trucks that would solve the cars identity.

       

      Stan 

    • May 16, 2020 10:20 AM EDT
    • Stanley Ames said:

      I have a wood (not plastic) 1:20.3 D&RGW 3000 series box car.

      I suspect it may be a built up Hartford kit.  Is there any‚Äč way to tell for sure?
      Thanks
      Stan
       There's a different level of detail between a PNG Kit and a Hartford kit.   The PNG kits are VERY sturdy.   
      For instance, this PNG Reefer has brass grab irons held in place with brass pins.
       
      This Hartford Caboose has everything cast but in finer detail;  as I recall, there were holds pre-drilled to hold the grab irons...but the metal is rather soft.
      There's a lot of under body detail as well.
       
      If you could post a picture, it MIGHT help...or it might just be too difficult to tell!