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    • August 15, 2020 2:40 AM EDT
    • HUzzah!  

    • August 15, 2020 12:52 AM EDT
    • Congrats on your "golden spike" moment!

    • August 14, 2020 7:01 PM EDT
    • nice.

      what i most liked, was where the loco is mirrored in the water.

    • August 14, 2020 6:53 PM EDT
    • Nice start Mikael, and welcome to the madness

    • August 14, 2020 6:20 PM EDT
    • gorgeous!!

       

    • August 14, 2020 6:08 PM EDT
    •  

      Nice! Brave soul having your first run be right next to a water feature!

       

    • August 14, 2020 5:06 PM EDT
    • .

      Hi all!
      I've been building a small garden railroad in G scale for over a year now.
      Today I was finally able to test a locomotive on the track. 

      It will be about 3.5 x 7 meters in a U-shape.

    • August 14, 2020 7:04 PM EDT
    • Rooster said:

      Dan,

        I ain't 3d printing anything but I sure enjoyed the website! It's a neat loco that really caught my eye. I'm (assuming) you fixed the pivot on the USA motor block and would like to see the bottom of the unit and if not that's cool. Nice work as always and thanks for the education!  

      Thanks Rooster,  One of the reasons I feel my choice of using a cut down and spliced USAT SD40-2 frame a poor one is the stock USAT 3 axle truck mount could not be used as it is made to fit in a recess that was no longer there!  So, I designed a custom one.  The truck is held firmly in line with no swivel but there is still a bit of up/down spring and I left the end axle "swinging in the breeze".  If it proves to be an issue in operation,  I will fix it and possibly grind the flanges from the middle axle.

       

       

    • August 14, 2020 6:11 PM EDT
    • Dan,

        I ain't 3d printing anything but I sure enjoyed the website! It's a neat loco that really caught my eye. I'm (assuming) you fixed the pivot on the USA motor block and would like to see the bottom of the unit and if not that's cool. Nice work as always and thanks for the education!  

    • August 14, 2020 4:45 PM EDT
    • Bob McCown said:

      That's a nifty little locomotive, I saw your post over on FB last night.  You wouldnt be interested in sharing the STLs for it, would you?

      Pondering this.  In the past I have shared many designs on Thingiverse but lately I've found someone has been printing my designs in questionable quality and selling for $$$ so I've been in a less sharing mood.  My intention has always been that folks print for themselves or friends for a reasonable cost.  I'll let ya know when I figure it out.

      -Dan

    • August 14, 2020 2:28 PM EDT
    • WOW!!!  That looks awesome! And what a cool little loco, too!

    • August 14, 2020 9:39 AM EDT
    • Beautiful work!  I love the color.

    • August 14, 2020 8:40 AM EDT
    • That's a nifty little locomotive, I saw your post over on FB last night.  You wouldnt be interested in sharing the STLs for it, would you?

    • August 13, 2020 11:40 PM EDT
    • I've never been too interested in the small switchers, but have gotten the bug to re-due some LGB switchers, the 2063 is one of them I plan to do in the near future. I will say here that your engine turned out very nice and all the work that you put into it shows. I like challenging myself and I see you do the same, once again great job.

       

      trainman

    • August 13, 2020 10:06 PM EDT
    • Something I've been working on but haven't posted here.  On LSC back in October there was a post about 3d printing software that ended with a discussion about combining different construction methods with 3d printing.  Martin Sant mentioned the TP56 which I though was an ideal loco to experiment with.

      The hood and cab where printed with an FDM printer but could be done with sheet material and a laser or CNC (my next experiment).  Most of the details are printed in resin and pressed into holes and slots.  I believe many modern locos can be made with this method.

      I chose to cut down an SD40-2 frame as is done by the prototype builder and used a USAT SD40-2 truck.  This proved to be a pain in the azz and I should have just printed the frame. (I will if I make another).

      There have only been a few of these built and they are all a bit different.  I chose to incorporate the features I like best and because the power is provided by a Caterpillar C9 I went with the CAT theme.

      For those of you not familiar with this cool little loco http://www.tractivepowercorp.com/

      Latest progress:

      Cut and tinted glass and added gaskets, Ditch lights, Sunshades, Wire grabs, decals and Safety stripes
      I decided to add a honeycomb pattern to the first door to carry the CAT theme.
      redesigned coupler mount with integrated
      added speaker opening to the fuel tank.
      Coleman Mach 8 AC unit - Passable but I need to learn to merge curve surfaces.

      todo list
      Brake chain
      more decals
      Handrails and stanchions
      Lift bars
      Install Railpro

       

    • August 14, 2020 4:40 PM EDT
    • Drooling over that control panel...

    • August 14, 2020 3:42 PM EDT
    • I've done some work with my Silhouette Cameo  Some basic car numbering and lettering, and the track and details on my ctc panel mockup.

       

       

       

       

      I've also used it to make stencils to paint lettering on a couple buildings.

       

    • August 14, 2020 2:43 PM EDT
    • FWIW, I also used DXF files to get the CAD linework over to the Cricut. It took some playing with to figure out, but now it's pretty straight forward. 

       

      I haven't done lettering yet, but when I do I'll probably try the method I referred to earlier: leaving little connecting pieces to each letter, so that they all stay together and aligned before and while placing, then knifing away the connectors. 

       

      [edit]

       

      I take that all back! There's an easy method to transfer all the lettering, with all the spacing intact. The main stuff happens around midway through.

       

       

      There are many of these "decal transfer" videos for Cricut & Silhouette on Youtube, I just saw one that used the same method but with regular clear shelf contact paper. I suspect though that the Cricut transfer material (or some knock off product ) has less stiction. 

       

       

       

    • August 13, 2020 8:46 PM EDT
    • Neal,

       

      The Silhouette can also import DXF files, however they can be problematic and physically change the geometry. you can also use all the Microsoft and any other fonts you have downloaded to your machine. results will vary with the font. I generally will run at the slowest speeds when cutting, especially with smaller size characters. sometimes you need to stop and remove pieces that have come loose from the backing. I have had the best results  making masks, as the cut letters often come loose from the backing.

       

      Al P.