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    • May 29, 2020 11:12 AM EDT
    • A-frickin-mazing, as usual. That view of the track winding its way through the building is awesome. Absolutely fabulous!

    • May 29, 2020 10:20 AM EDT
    • That's awesome Ray, and once again my favourite photos are the night shots. Other then the trains, my layout gets pretty boring at night. Yours on the other hand really comes to life. Well done.

       

      Shane

       

    • May 29, 2020 10:16 AM EDT
    • Wow, just Wow!

    • May 29, 2020 10:06 AM EDT
    • Yea, what they said!..............

    • May 29, 2020 8:24 AM EDT
    •  

      My flabber is officially gasted.

       

       

    • May 29, 2020 7:38 AM EDT
    • Amazing, simply amazing. 

      Doc

    • May 29, 2020 6:18 AM EDT
    • Well played Ray, though it most likely won't be noticed, will you be adding some ledgers and paper piles to the office shelves?

    • May 29, 2020 4:38 AM EDT
    • I finally got around to finishing up the Mineral Ridge Mill. I started this building in December 2013, and had it basically completed by July 2014. But it still needed lights and interior details.

       

      For a while I considered leaving the building empty, and just putting some lights in it to make the windows light up. Towards this end, I sprayed the inside of the glass with matte clear coat, to fog them up. I wasn't happy with it. Even with the windows fogged it would still look empty. But I didn't want to try modeling realistic milling equipment, especially when trying to fit it into a compressed structure.

       

      The solution I came up with was to just make some "view blocks" that could be positioned near the windows and would give the impression that the structure was full of machinery, chemical vats, structural timbers, stairs, etc. Behind these, I would still have plenty of room to run wires for lights, and access the interior for maintenance if needed.

       

      Here are a few photos of this process. The first shows one of the view block assemblies and its installation in the upper level of the mill:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4790cc/IMG_4790cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4800/IMG_4800.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4801/IMG_4801.jpg[/img]

       


      Next, the middle section of the mill:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4798/IMG_4798.jpg[/img]

       


      And the lower level. At the left is a small enclosed area representing the mill's office:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4796/IMG_4796.jpg[/img]

       


      I made some fixtures for the building's exterior lighting. The lampshades were made from Plastruct styrene domes, carved out to a thinner profile. I made two versions, one with a short neck for use above the freight door, and two long-necked lamps to light the main and rear entrances.

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_2158cc/IMG_2158cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_2161cc/IMG_2161cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4808/IMG_4808.jpg[/img]

       


      One mistake I made in the original construction of the mill was using removable roofs to access the interior. The unsecured roofs warped badly. To correct this, I needed to make them a permanent part of the structure. Ideally, it would have been best to build new roofs, but that was way more work than I wanted to do and would have wasted a lot of material. So I decided to glue the original roofs in place and also use screws secure them to the walls. This would have the effect of straightening the roofs a bit. The results are not perfect but are acceptable. Then I had to add some extra bits of corrugated metal to hide the screws, as well as to cover some gaps:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4816/IMG_4816.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4820cc/IMG_4820cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4819cc/IMG_4819cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4823/IMG_4823.jpg[/img]

       


      Next I masked off all but the new bits for painting. I used a coat of self-etching primer followed by Rustoleum's Cold Galvanizing Compound. Later I weathered it to match the existing structure:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4824cc/IMG_4824cc.jpg[/img]

       


      The sorting house on top of the mill's huge ore bin also needed to have the roof screwed and glued permanently in place. Unfortunately the openings in two of the walls, combined with the lack of a floor, caused the walls to be pulled out of shape, and it no longer fit perfectly on top of the ore bin:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4850cc/IMG_4850cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4939cc/IMG_4939cc.jpg[/img]

       


      The only way to fix this was to make some metal straps that could be used to hold the walls firmly in place, forcing them into shape. I made them by cutting up some small brass hinges:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4948cc/IMG_4948cc.jpg[/img]

       


      You can see the metal straps in this photo. I still need to do some work to minimize the appearance of the full-scale screws:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5015cc/IMG_5015cc.jpg[/img]

       


      At the very top of this structure is a place for ore carts to dump ore. I had never gotten around to making the grate, or "grizzly" for this, which screens out oversized chunks of ore, so I did it now. I still have to fill in the gap where the mine track enters to grizzly:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4950cc/IMG_4950cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4952cc/IMG_4952cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4955cc/IMG_4955cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4998/IMG_4998.jpg[/img]

       


      I also made a lamp post to shed some light on the track and grizzly:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5002c/IMG_5002c.jpg[/img]

       


      One thing left to do is make a small trestle extending from this side of the ore bin, for dumping waste rock:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5019cc/IMG_5019cc.jpg[/img]

       


      A view of the sorting house interior with the newly added lights:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5037/IMG_5037.jpg[/img]

       


      As darkness falls, the lights bring the mill to life:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5053/IMG_5053.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_5060/IMG_5060.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4997cc/IMG_4997cc.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4985/IMG_4985.jpg[/img]


      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4830/IMG_4830.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4835cc/IMG_4835cc.jpg[/img]

       


      Looking through some of the windows:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4846c/IMG_4846c.jpg[/img]

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4847/IMG_4847.jpg[/img]

       


      Looking up the street towards the ore bin, sorting house, and trestles:

      [img]http://www.raydunakin.com/Site/IRR_Mineral_Ridge_Mill_files/Media/IMG_4979cc/IMG_4979cc.jpg[/img]

       

      That's it for now. Enjoy!

       

       

    • May 29, 2020 6:21 AM EDT
    • John Caughey said:

      Grind and sand smooth the hammer end of a finishing nail, bend it 15 to 40 degrees and chuck in your hand drill. Run at slow speed you have a dent-O-matic!

       

      Nice tool tip John. Thank you

    • May 28, 2020 11:12 PM EDT
    • If you reread the part about going slow, it will dent the wood, a smooth ball end won't grab.

      A polished nail makes an effective burnisher, with a light touch, one allows he tool to do the job.

    • May 28, 2020 5:22 PM EDT
    • John Caughey said:

      Grind and sand smooth the hammer end of a finishing nail, bend it 15 to 40 degrees and chuck in your hand drill. Run at slow speed you have a dent-O-matic!

      Sounds very nasty.  I'm not sure what would happen to wood if you try to dent it!

    • May 28, 2020 5:12 PM EDT
    • Grind and sand smooth the hammer end of a finishing nail, bend it 15 to 40 degrees and chuck in your hand drill. Run at slow speed you have a dent-O-matic!

    • May 28, 2020 3:04 PM EDT
    • Looking at overspray on surface cab is sitting on, it ain't the cab, it's the paint.

      Good catch Forrest. I just got home and went to see what state it was in, and as you deduced, the paint didn't like the 80 degrees, 90 % humidity typical of FL in the early summer.

       

      On the wood finish...  I would beat it up more rather than sanding.

      Jon, I did wonder about that. I'm planning to sand the worst off, but as it is paint I can spray it with my baby blue and we'll see what will happen. Then carve and dent it, maybe. (I'm good at dirtying wagons, not so much at bashing them into submission. Maybe I need more practice.)

    • May 28, 2020 1:24 PM EDT
    • Pete Thornton said:

      Maybe it's that new can of spray paint. . .

       

      Looking at overspray on surface cab is sitting on, it ain't the cab, it's the paint.
      Have had similar happen twice, and not on wood, within the 12 years I've lived at this address but do not remember the details.

    • May 28, 2020 1:20 PM EDT
    • Pete Thornton said: The squarish pieces slide in the rectangle of the side plates. 

       

      Hey, thanks! Knowing that, I get what's happening.
      That the other side plate was omitted for the picture I had gathered, but that the square bits slide, I had not understood.

    • May 28, 2020 12:58 PM EDT
    • On the wood finish...  I would beat it up more rather than sanding. Scratches, dings, dents, gouges will all work to hide the fuzz.  "make it old and dirty" as Mac said.

    • May 28, 2020 10:20 AM EDT
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      The way that draft gear assembles looks odd. Can't totally define how/why beyond that it seems to render the spring irrelevant, but something else strikes me as odd too.

      Yes, me too.

      The spring goes over the brass tube which slides in the hole of the 2 squarish pieces, which are thus held apart by the spring, which does not go through the holes. The squarish pieces slide in the rectangle of the side plates. With one quick google I found this, which is how mine goes together, in theory. (My side plates are not open - they are against the wood draft beams.)

       

       

      Ah - this photo shows it sorta together. The other side plate goes on top.

       

       

      (What is really weird is that the instructions tell you to use the plastic NBWs on the other side of the draft beams opposite the bolts in the side plates. Would you really use a long threaded rod with a nut on each end instead of a long bolt with a washer?)

       

      Onward and upward. I gave the body a quick spray of primer this morning and the wood is much worse than I suspected. It will take a lot of sanding - though I guess a Backwoods loco would be made from rough-sawn wood.  (As a digression, this wood effect is my only complaint about laser-cut wooden parts. they destroy the illusion that each plank is a separate piece of wood!)

      Maybe it's that new can of spray paint. . .

       

    • May 27, 2020 5:00 PM EDT
    • The way that draft gear assembles looks odd. Can't totally define how/why beyond that it seems to render the spring irrelevant, but something else strikes me as odd too.

    • May 27, 2020 5:01 PM EDT
    • Thanks, Bob!

    • May 27, 2020 4:26 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      Nice, Bob!  Is the siding a commercial product or repurposed beverage can?

       

      Thanks, 

      Eric

      Neither!  Its steel shim stock (5/1000s) run through the crimper.  Rusts up nicely.