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    • April 28, 2020 7:32 PM EDT
    • All,

       

      Thanks!  I remembered i have a bunch of pink foam that we used for the Mik.  Maybe we could count, mount, and cover that?  Due to size, I think I'd have to fasten the structure to something to hold it in place.  Time to save some carboard and start working on the mock-ups.

       

      As for hoppers, out here the mills refined and bagged the sugar.  The OR&L shipped the final product to the docks or the local industries bagged and ready to go, so this project will follow that model.

       

      Some studying to do here before some hapless cardboard gets converted into shapes.

       

      Eric

    • April 28, 2020 2:09 PM EDT
    • The coroplast ( campaign signs, usually free for the taking AFTER an election)does need some structural bracing inside to keep things  square and give it a little heft. On the corners they add gluing surface too! 

    • April 28, 2020 1:32 PM EDT
    • Dan Hilyer said:
      Ken Brunt said:
      ...........................................

      I have used the soda can and crimper method to make corrugated siding, but I found it too tedious, especially for  larger buildings. My go-to material for corrugated siding is the Precision Products sheets that come in a 16" square sheet. But that's just me. 

      ..................................

       

      Ken, I've never found having a beer or twelve tedious   But your mileage may vary.

       

      Eric,  this sounds like a great project for you and the Mueller clan.  I will be following with great interest.

      After about 12 beers you may find staggering around trying to remember your looking for a crimper tedious..............;)

       

    • April 28, 2020 9:40 AM EDT
    • Ken Brunt said:
      ...........................................

      I have used the soda can and crimper method to make corrugated siding, but I found it too tedious, especially for  larger buildings. My go-to material for corrugated siding is the Precision Products sheets that come in a 16" square sheet. But that's just me. 

      ..................................

       

      Ken, I've never found having a beer or twelve tedious   But your mileage may vary.

       

      Eric,  this sounds like a great project for you and the Mueller clan.  I will be following with great interest.

    • April 28, 2020 5:21 AM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      For the moment, this remains a thought project as I wait for the quarantines to lift, but I think it is a necessary, but doable feature on our railroad.  It is exciting to go from "Can we get and keep trains running?" to "Why are trains running in the first place?"

      Thanks for any suggestions in advance,

      Eric

      That's always the fun part. Having your RR evolve from a simple, what I call "trains through the tulips" to giving it a purpose for it's existence in the first place. Transporting products from one customer to the next customer in the supply chain. 

      As for what a sugar mill looks like in Hawaii, I have no idea. But as a truck driver I have been to sugar mills down in Georgia. They are huge facilities, and if I remember correctly lots of pipes and over head racks running hither and yon carrying who knows what. There are also lots of large metal buildings around here, and they all basically look the same. 

      My materials of choice for most of my buildings range from coroplast to PVC to plexiglass, depending on what I have on hand and the size of the structure. I also have to take into consideration the weather in this neck of the woods. Rain, sleet, snow, hail and wind from below freezing to high 90's. Larger structures I usually use the coroplast since the size of the building adds to the weight. Smaller buildings I'll go with the PVC, since it's weight will help anchor the building. All of these materials are readily available around here and I find them easy to work with and reasonably cheap. But I also have a moderately sized shop to work in(my garage). They also give you a large gluing area to adhere your final covering to.  

      I have used the soda can and crimper method to make corrugated siding, but I found it too tedious, especially for  larger buildings. My go-to material for corrugated siding is the Precision Products sheets that come in a 16" square sheet. But that's just me. 

      That's gives you a basic run down of how I model a building, and the materials I like to use. Others choices may differ. 

      And I hope that helps you out a little anyway.

       

    • April 28, 2020 5:01 AM EDT
    • Eric,

      Put the mill up the side of the hill, the carrier (off loading facility) can be where the cane cars are, with raw sugar out via a hopper built over where "Diesel Dan" is sitting.

      All connected both up and down via a covered in conveyor system, mills used mile of conveyor belts.

      There is no reason why the mill could not be 2 or even 3 stories high, the mill I am planning will be something similar just to fit it in.

      If you modelled one without compressing you would need an extra block of land just to fit in all the ancillary buildings and service areas they were/still are huge.

      Below are images of the mill in one of the towns I lived in, you can see in one of the images that input and the output were side by side with the processing being done to one side.  From memory it was an L shape to fit it into the land area.

      There is an image of Millaquin mill which is where I am now and it still operates and supplies the distillery next door with the molasses used for making Bundaberg Rum.

      https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=babinda+sugar+mill+queensland&qpvt=babinda+sugar+mill+queensland&FORM=IGRE

      For corrugated iron look at using foil cooking trays run through a craft paper crimper it weathers well and looks like corrugated iron.

    • April 28, 2020 3:19 AM EDT
    • All,

       

          I received a suggestion to consider shoe-horning a sugar mill onto the Triple O, which is a logical next step, as it not only help to anchor the Triple O in time and place, but it would serve as a reason to have any of a number of other facilities - fuel for the mill, service facilities for the locomotives, loading docks for outbound bags of sugar, etc.  In short, the mill would become a focus for that part of the railroad and be the reason other buildings come into being going forward.  Out here, these were massive.  The advantage  from a modeling perspective is that they were simple, with the photos on hand basically showing huge, corrugated metal covered buildings and a towering stack.  I have to review books make a site visit to the surviving structures in Waipahu before proceeding, but I wanted to ask a very basic question:  how to begin?

          The outward simplicity suggests a frame covered with corrugated metal. I am actually considering a PVC pipe frame, but I am not sure how I would emulate the metal sides beyond drink, cut, crimp, glue, repeat... The usual issues I have with local supply and local environmental challenges (heat, salty air, water, termites) apply, but  I have to canvas the stores once the quarantine lifts, too, to see what sort of material I can readily procure locally.

          To better frame the issue, below are an overhead and "primary viewing angle" of the only possible site for this structure:

      There is no room to move the tracks, though the POLA shed could go away.

       

           In theory, the outermost tracks are the mainline and passing sidings of the Triple O (our analog to the OR&L).  Here, in the town of Pu'u'oma'o, plantation supplies and empty boxcars would go where Diesel Dan is currently sitting with the plantation's snap track.  The mill would sit where those two buildings are (gifts from my very talented father-in-law) and extend over the innermost track where Komaka Iki sits with his string of still-to-be-finished cane cars.  This is where cane would be offloaded into the mill.  An indoor transfer facility would obviate the need for internal details, which is OK with me, to include the lift to take the cane up into the mill.  Clearly, there needs to be some selective compression, and I am going to have to focus on out-buildings that scream "plantation."  I am thinking mill and power plant at a minimum. 

       

          For the moment, this remains a thought project as I wait for the quarantines to lift, but I think it is a necessary, but doable feature on our railroad.  It is exciting to go from "Can we get and keep trains running?" to "Why are trains running in the first place?"

       

      Thanks for any suggestions in advance,

      Eric

       

    • April 29, 2020 9:34 AM EDT
    • Nice. It's been a few years since I have been there. You have also made great strides in finishing off the room. Looks great!

    • April 28, 2020 12:19 PM EDT
    • A couple of more pictures today . these are Banta Model works Miners cabins. they have been built for a long time but were perched precariously on the bench work for many years. fortunately neither ever hit the floor.

      Prior to infilling this area with pink foam. I installed servo operated switch stands on all of the wye turnouts.

      Basic scenery is in place. hope to have this and many other areas complete when we get together this year.

       

      Al P.

       

    • April 28, 2020 7:03 AM EDT
    • Jon,

       

      Having learned how to hand lay code 70 in HOn3, code 250 is a breeze. it is all in having the correct tools. I got some of the Micro Engineering snap gauges early on with two of there switches (no longer offered) I have and old Pullman track gauge, and a couple of gauges I had custom machined. with the correct spikes it goes quite quick. I do not spike every tie, as I leave space for future adjustments.

      Cross section of the rook section:

       

    • April 27, 2020 2:21 PM EDT
    • Nice. I wish I had the patience to hand lay my indoor.  I will be spiking rail on the trestle I'm building, but other than two bridges I'm pretty much a plastic tie guy.

       

    • April 27, 2020 10:52 AM EDT
    • Those of you who have visited my layout probably remember the single AMS passenger car side sitting at Vance Junction, looking out of place. well I finally did something about it.  A while ago I did a 3d model for the roof  for a commercial model co. So the roof started with that with a upscale, cut it in half, then Scrunched up to fit in 7/8" space. yes that is correct. the AMS Body  had its windows covered  with blue tape, and I sacrificed one of the ends I had buy cutting down each side to 5/8", and screwed and glued this to the main side. the sides and roof were heavily weathered using successive layers of paint, that were scratched between coats.

      the platform was made up of a piece of 3/8 cabinet grade plywood, over layered with 3/4 wide x 1/8 thick planks, and stained. the board was warped a little and to straighten and mount the side I applied a 1/2 " x 13/32 block of pine  to the bottom using existing tabs  and woodscrews to the  base.

      one of the other things I have done is to get most of the landforms complete, and ballasted all the indoor track. more to come soon.

       

       

    • April 28, 2020 7:49 PM EDT
    • Four year old, falling lava rocks, and construction cement...What could go wrong?  Actually, Kid-zilla and I fixed some landscaping issues and repaired some buildings before I glued the glue gun to myself.

       

      Battery clips and switches are on order for the coaches.  The cane cars await the full opening of the hardware and craft stores. M&K Sugar Mill is in the research and planning stages. Glitchy Gustav calls from his box... There is no escaping... Like a moth unto the flame go I (and my VISA)...

       

      Eric

    • April 28, 2020 4:20 PM EDT
    • Seems to fit in there very nicely....   

    • April 28, 2020 9:48 AM EDT
    • Test fit.

    • April 27, 2020 2:05 PM EDT
    • Well;  Remembering that I'm not very neat when it comes to caulk, I began pondering other methods when I remembered I had some small balsa wood sticks and grey acylic paint in stock.  Even with the bent forest in place, I wasn't real happy with the shadow, so several lengths of balsa were trimmed to fit, then painted. I also painted the fill piece that was previously black. Fortunately I could slip a sheet of paper under the buttresses to protect the grass mat...

       

      I need to decide on how perfect I want this, now that tiny sliver of a gap to the right is more noticeable.  I do have styrene and that same color grey in vinyl. I guess bent building may wait some more!

       

      And while waiting for the paint to dry I went over the bents and stringers one more time. This time I used a stiff nylon brush to remove some of the iron oxide coating that made a few of them look like steel.  I then brushed on a liberal coat of white vinegar to smooth out / tone down the color and raise some additional grain. Here they are drying after getting the treatment...

       

      So I told my boss today that even though I am not at work, I am keeping my fabrication and painting skills sharp!

       

    • April 27, 2020 10:15 AM EDT
    • Pete Lassen said:

      almond colored caulk to fill the small gaps, it will look close enough to a concrete bed the blocks were laid on.

      Good idea Pete.  I'm pretty sure I only have white in stock, but it's paintable....  Hmmm.  Was going to start setting the trestles today, but it might be a good idea to do that first.  I need to take a closer look with the bent forest in place. It may take an act of contortion to see it then!

    • April 27, 2020 10:11 AM EDT
    • almond colored caulk to fill the small gaps, it will look close enough to a concrete bed the blocks were laid on.

    • April 26, 2020 10:02 PM EDT
    • Sometimes rubber cement makes a good trial glue ....