Forums » Modeling

List of newest posts

    • August 10, 2020 12:53 AM EDT
    • Tim, 

       

      That was my thought.  I think I can more profitable use that space for an outbuilding, bric-a-brac, or simply "margin of error!"

      Eric

    • August 9, 2020 11:45 PM EDT
    • Getting a straight car on a curved track to match up with a curved loading dock or platform is a pain.  I re-cut the Middleton passenger platform like ten times before getting a 'barely acceptable' result.  (That was before the big do-over, which let me work some straights onto the passenger siding - but now, I have to rebuild the platform)

    • August 9, 2020 11:45 PM EDT
    • Getting a straight car on a curved track to match up with a curved loading dock or platform is a pain.  I re-cut the Middleton passenger platform like ten times before getting a 'barely acceptable' result.  (That was before the big do-over, which let me work some straights onto the passenger siding - but now, I have to rebuild the platform)

    • August 9, 2020 8:22 PM EDT
    • Update:

       

      My fingers healed up, so I  was able to make some progress!  Despite OD's caution to the contrary, I cut the portals 1/4" wider all around  all by myself!

       

      Komaka Iki and his engineer seem much, much happier.  Feeling good about myself, I proceeded to cut the next wall, and I learned about error propagation the hard way:

      ...and followed it up by completely goofing my effort to  free hand the correction by gliding the cutter along the top of the straight edge:

      OD, who was by working on her Mini-Mik project immediately said, "Wrong tool, Dad!  Yo should've used the hot knife!"  When does she graduate?  Seriously, though, patching foam is pretty easy.  A bit of glue and patience with a dash of swallowed pride, and all was well.

       

           Next, I really, really took a look at the loading dock area.  My original plan was to extend it the length of the shed, but that won't accommodate the swing of the box car unless I leave a rather large gap between dock and car:

       

      Going with a long, skinny dock will give me more margin of error when I place this on the railroad, and, of course, I could build some ramps for employees to lay across the gap.  This is an option.  The other is to make the dock the length of the 12" straight track which would let me bring it right up to the box car.  The level in the picture below is where the shot doc would end:

      I could also be bold and carve quarter circles at each end. Bottom line in all  of this, I am very, very, very glad I had the foresight to test, test, and retest!  I vaguely recall someone else who made a building / portal / bridge / whatever that didn't accommodate locomotive or rolling stock! Can't have been anyone on this site, though! 

       

        Today, I found a 22.5 degree line on the cutting board I just bought three years ago.  After carefully making a template, I again attempted unsupervised foam cutting to make ends for the unloading shed.

       

      I forgot to photograph the foam work, but it'll do, trust me!  I originally used a 30-60-90 roofline in the cardboard mock-up,  but, as GAP mentioned, I needed to break what was almost a continuous roofline.  This'll look good.

       

          A few quick thoughts before I close this section.  I am holding this all together with foam glue.  Shishkabob skewers driven into the foam pin the pieces together.  Once I a done puttering with the shed, I will brace the corners with scrap lumber, too.  The primary election results should be out today, so I know which signs will have no use in November and thus will be available to  contribute to some other cause.  Once the roof is in place, I will figure where and whether to cut windows and whether or not I should still cut the wall in the unloader shed to at least imply an interior.  I may actually seal this all up with latex paint prior to that so I can get it out on thee railroad and test everything in place with trains running.

       

      Slowly but steadily, this project lurches forward!

       

      Aloha,

      Eric

       

       

       

    • August 9, 2020 11:27 PM EDT
    • Rick Marty wrote: "It is 1:12th scale, I'm pretty sure."

       Chuck's incredible Fordson tugger hoist model is 1/16th scale.

       

       

    • August 9, 2020 11:26 PM EDT
    • Pete Lassen wrote:  "

      Ray, the medallion at the top of the safe door, how in the world did you paint that? And even in the space you had to work I can clearly see a  desert type scenery painting and that work , which will never be noticed or seen well enough unless people shove their cameras into the window and take pictures is what is so amazing. "

       

      I hand-painted it with a very fine brush. It's actually just rough shapes, which gives the impression of being more detailed when seen from a few inches away. The gold "lettering" around it is also just tiny blotches of gold paint. I would have preferred to have that medallion and gold lettering done as a decal but I just wanted to get this done quick and not have to wait any longer on it.

       

      << Do you ever host an open house? I'm in the Phoenix area but would gladly drive the 6 hours there to visit your layout.>>

       

      We usually host our local club in February, though who knows when we'll be able to have club meetings again at this point. But if you're ever going to be in the area we can arrange a visit.

       

      BTW, as I get older I've thought more about the future of the layout and what will happen to it after I'm gone, as well as the fact that few people can ever actually see the interior details. Since many of the structures are named after and dedicated to various family members, I plan to eventually put together a "coffee table" style book and have it published by one of those "vanity press" outfits. I can have a section for each of the buildings and include the close up shots of the interiors, etc. Then I give copies to all my family and friends, and maybe donate one to the local model railroad museum.

       

    • August 8, 2020 10:26 AM EDT
    • Ray, the medallion at the top of the safe door, how in the world did you paint that? And even in the space you had to work I can clearly see a  desert type scenery painting and that work , which will never be noticed or seen well enough unless people shove their cameras into the window and take pictures is what is so amazing. 

      Do you ever host an open house? I'm in the Phoenix area but would gladly drive the 6 hours there to visit your layout.

    • August 9, 2020 8:47 PM EDT
    • Bill,

      While not as elaborate as the other work presented here, Komaka Iki sits on a STAINZ chassis salvaged off of e-Bay:

       

      The loco, for new forum members, was a shattered LGB m2075 (battery) we brought back into revenue service through the help of numerous forum members.  

       

      Eric

    • August 9, 2020 11:02 AM EDT
    • Thanks Nick, certainly enjoyed looking at your train, great goods looking especially like the tender, is it powered? Thanks for the share, Bill

    • August 8, 2020 9:38 PM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

         This all started on the thread by Nick and his beautiful 0-4-0t Stainz bash

      Thank you, I certainly aim to inspire others, and I do greatly like the variety of your bashes. The walkway planking on the fruity Forney caught my eye in particular.

      I believe I kept mentioning the blue/grey 2017 of mine in the prior thread, and I did a separate writeup of it in its own thread some time ago. That engine as it happens is actually host to an entire themed consist of the same color.

      Almost entirely LGB, aside from the LBH tender (nicely proportioned fit behind the engine) and the English (Bachmann Thomas) tank wagon.

      Less of a kitbash, more of a paint and detail. The tender is what sets it apart in my eyes.

    • August 9, 2020 8:41 PM EDT
    • Rick Marty said:

      OK, a completely ignorant question here. 

      How does this vinyl cutting thing work? does the machine do it all or is there a bunch of computer programing involved??

      Thanks for any enlightenment

      Basically, it's a simple CNC machine with a drag knife.  You just load a graphic into the software, tell it you want to cut around the edges, load the sheet of vinyl and and hit go.  The machine lowers an x-acto like blade to the depth of the vinyl tracing your graphic.  Then you pick off the parts you don't want (like the inside of an 'O') and transfer to the model.  It gets a bit more interesting if your design is intricate like scroll work.

      No real "programming" involved.

      -Dan

    • August 9, 2020 7:00 PM EDT
    • OK, a completely ignorant question here. 

      How does this vinyl cutting thing work? does the machine do it all or is there a bunch of computer programing involved??

      Thanks for any enlightenment

    • August 9, 2020 4:24 PM EDT
    • Matt Z said:

      These have been some great posts, amazing what you guys have done with it all. 

      I just got the thinner material in today, I am thinking that this may set up nicer over rivets and in between woods slats. Which happens to be Oracle 651 which I just saw fails on styrene,... haha. guess we shall see. 

      The thicker product is a variant of style tech and that seemed to work well until I peeled it off. 

      Matt 

      How true.  Just think about how much expertise is available here!   i am always amazed at the talent displayed by the people here on LSC.   It is truly amazing.

       

    • August 9, 2020 3:53 PM EDT
    • These have been some great posts, amazing what you guys have done with it all. 

       

      I just got the thinner material in today, I am thinking that this may set up nicer over rivets and in between woods slats. Which happens to be Oracle 651 which I just saw fails on styrene,... haha. guess we shall see. 

       

      The thicker product is a variant of style tech and that seemed to work well until I peeled it off. 

       

      Matt 

       

       

    • August 9, 2020 11:45 AM EDT
    • That's some amazing vinyl cutter work, Cliff and Dan!  

      I have the other brand of vinyl cutter, a Silhouette.  Very happy with it; have used it mostly for building signage.  I use only Oracal 651 vinyl topped with clear UV.  Here are a few examples, followed by a couple examples showing the limitations.

      All of the signage on the buildings shown here are done with the vinyl cutter.  Although this is indoors at our Thanksgiving show, these buildings have been outside spring thru fall for several years without any issues.

      x

      Signage on the building here is vinyl; trolley signage isn't.

      x

      Limitations

      1)  While my vinyl cutter will cut fine detail with impressive accuracy, I don't do lettering smaller than about 1/2" high.  I'm limited by my ability to weed (remove excess vinyl) and transfer the vinyl to my building.  So I wouldn't try to use it for rolling stock reporting marks.  

      2) It's best to adhere the vinyl to a smooth surface, such as ABS sheet.  For textured surfaces, I use the vinyl cutter with cardstock and a stencil font as on the building shown here (painting by Mrs. Neals).

      x

      3) For some reason Oracal 651 does not permanently adhere to styrene.  Here you can see the vinyl starting to peel off after just one season in the sun.  This has never happened with ABS.

      x

      Once you have a vinyl cutter, you'll find 1:1 scale uses for it as well.

      x

    • August 9, 2020 3:30 PM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      Nick, perhaps he ment 

      gonkulator

      [common; from the 1960s Hogan's Heroes TV series] A pretentious piece of equipment that actually serves no useful purpose. Usually used to describe one's least favorite piece of computer hardware. See gonk.  have used it many times in conversations to describe a piece of junk, funny, if it is spelled correctly with an L I have no ides the meaning, BB

       

      Wow, I guess I can't take any credit for Glonkulator then.  I DID watch Hogan's Heroes way back when there were only 3 channels, so perhaps I picked it up from that.  Whatever, it is nothing really.

    • August 9, 2020 12:34 PM EDT
    • Nick, perhaps he ment 

      gonkulator

      [common; from the 1960s Hogan's Heroes TV series] A pretentious piece of equipment that actually serves no useful purpose. Usually used to describe one's least favorite piece of computer hardware. See gonk.  have used it many times in conversations to describe a piece of junk, funny, if it is spelled correctly with an L I have no ides the meaning, BB

       

    • August 8, 2020 9:13 PM EDT
    • Greetings everyone, and thank you very much for the praise and taking the time to read and enjoy. This engine has a new life with a whole new identity and despite the various setbacks through the build, I am pleased to have it in the collection and am currently giving it priority runtime on the ceiling line.

      To answer one fellow, I don't mind the factory-cast LGB on the sides of the tanks. Considering it is also on my blue/grey 2017 and plated in gold on my '83 2010 Stainz, I guess it just has never bothered me as a mark of the builder, even on a kitbash.

      Finally, I like finding and fabricating funky word combinations with prefixes and suffixes and stuff, as a fiction writer, but Glonkulator is a new one to me. Is that a generator unit of some such?

    • August 8, 2020 2:41 PM EDT
    • I got back from my trip to the Poconos and the weather is still cooperating, so more paint and progress.  The stove is Accucraft from a J&S coach, and I made the chairs from leftovers.

       

       

      The paint was a bit garish, so I dug in my stash and found some "Hunt Club Green" satin which went on very nicely. I did sand down the paint with a little wet 320 emory which helped.

      The end rails and grabs are on (also ex-Accucraft) and I am slowly making the roof. As NENG only gave me some flat 1/16th basswood, it has to be glued on the curved ribs and left for 24 hours to set properly.

       

       

      There's the clerestory getting its wings glued on. The big lump on each end is a partially shaped balsa block that I have to curve to match the roof. As the clerestory is painted and will need to be masked, I'll probably glue in the windows before painting the roof.