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    • May 2, 2020 11:52 AM EDT
    • You mean like this guy at Brunt Junction?

    • May 2, 2020 10:00 AM EDT
    • I think it was on Chat, Fred posted it from someone in the club, Maybe a day or 2 ago?

    • May 1, 2020 9:08 PM EDT
    • Rooster ' said:

      Didn't know where else to put it but rumor has it there's( focusing on proper spelin) ,their's, theyer'es ,there is a Ken Brunt figure soon to come on the market! However this is only rumor an I have no pictures to prove differently.

       

      ONLY A RUMOR

      Just great....I suspect that you have now ruined it for the rest of us as there will now be such a demand that we will never be able to get the quantity we need! 

      Sheesh...dang roosters  

    • May 1, 2020 7:50 PM EDT
    • Didn't know where else to put it but rumor has it there's( focusing on proper spelin) ,their's, theyer'es ,there is a Ken Brunt figure soon to come on the market! However this is only rumor an I have no pictures to prove differently.

       

      ONLY A RUMOR

    • May 2, 2020 11:20 AM EDT
    • Made mine using left over caboose body that I had stolen the cupola off of for my drover caboose, sat it on a LGB bridge pier and made it a dual purpose office cause there were 2 doors 1 at each end and a paper clip for a radio antenna

      mow/yard office 

    • May 2, 2020 10:27 AM EDT
    • Bob, here's my rendition of MOW yard with the good ole' Bachmann guy at work.  

       

       

       

    • April 30, 2020 7:39 PM EDT
    • It needs an "Alley Rabbit" sitting on the roof.

    • April 30, 2020 6:15 PM EDT
    • Alternately, I could have this sit along the track, and have a pair or rails going to it, as a speeder shed.  That might be fun.

    • May 2, 2020 2:39 AM EDT
    • Tim, 

       

      I am waiting for the local craft store to open.  Hopefully, they'll have something.   I have almost enough stuff on my list to justify a run to the hardware store, so we'll see what they  have, too.  

       

      For now, the boys helped me deck over the frames.  Tomorrow, we'll touch things up a bit, and at least we'll have some nice flats.  It is fun to see our own handiwork on the rails behind motive power we restored from a low baseline.  It should be more fun with decks on these frames!  I am still debating between leaving them plain or following the local practice of painting them green.  I might paint one and see how it looks.

       

      Eric

    • May 1, 2020 10:38 PM EDT
    • Did you locate suitable chains for the cars?

       

    • May 1, 2020 9:04 PM EDT
    • Update:

       

      As I run out of lock-down project material, I returned to these can cares.  First, a coat of flat black on my kebob skewers went a long way to making those look like metal.  Next, I looked to where I have been ignoring the deck.  The plan is still to drill holes in the end beams to mount the vertical posts for the bulkheads and to use cotter pins dropped into holes in the frame to attach the chains.  I had been holding off on the deck due to lack of cotter pins.  I had planned to place the pins, then cut the deck to suit.  Then it dawned on me to go back to my photographs.  The eybolts holding the chains went through the deck into the frame:

      OK.  I unnecessarily delayed this project when the answer was literally in my research of the real thing.   Duhhhhh....

       

          Craft sticks and hobby saw are on hand.  Time to deck over the frames!  

       

      Eric

       

      P.S. Forrest, the author of that book I cited has a bunch of books on the Kingdom's / Republic's / Territory's rail systems.  Many are expensive and hard to find, but at least I know they are out there!  The funny thing is, I don't even know what I was searching for when I stumbled upon the ad for this little booklet!

    • May 2, 2020 2:34 AM EDT
    •       Hey!  This was definitely the difficult and frustrating part of the project.....  The roof.  After finishing off the coach's railings with a gold sharpie, we started to glue down parts of an old shirt with Titebond III to the roof.

       

           Before we get to that, though, here is a pic of some of the other work:

      In the pic above if you can see that the hand railing to the right of the door has kind of a ring near the corner of it, it's because we had to make that that one.  It was missing that railing, so we took a thin metal pole, made it gold, and the ring-like thing is a bobby pin holding the corner in place.  My dad thought of that one.  We also used a sheet of plastic for the doors' windows on each side of the car.

       

            The problem with making the roof was that I put one piece of cloth on the whole roof, then cut, but what I should have done was cut the pieces as precise as possible so that I wouldn't have to worry about so much cutting and ripped cloth, or peeled paint in the process.  Getting it to look decent was that one part of the project that you may never get right and it's just really difficult.

      Here's the roof: 

       

       You can see where the fabric didn't agree with me and it looks all ripped.   :/

       

       

       

      You can also see in this pic that the window frames are painted and touched up.  We didn't put things together just yet because I'm worried we'll get glue or paint on it.  Anyway, my next step is to finish up the roof by cutting the fabric as smooth as can and then painting it probably a matte black.  Then I can paint the logo and design on the coach and put everything together.  I will try get Kiwi to be the first passenger on the coach and have him star in a video.  He can actually come outside, but with his wings growing back, he has to wear the leash he dreads.  It's for his own good though, once he fluttered up to the roof!  At least he's starting to get the idea that birdie + leash = birdie gets to go outside.

       

      Again thank you for the tips and yes, Mr. Devon, I can see the coach it's becoming too.  There's not much left on the to-do list.  And I guess bird poop is natural weathering!  Just remember, even if my dad helps me out, I'm not letting him do anything with the design!  That's gonna be all me.

       

      -OD

    • May 1, 2020 11:19 PM EDT
    • Thanks again, everyone.  I have decided once the blockade lifts, I'll make my run to Lowes.  The plan is to mount this thing on HardieBacker, which has served for years as the foundations of several of our buildings.  Then we can just build right on top, starting with the mill facilities and moving outwards from there.  Since we have the foam, that will serve as the mill's core.  It looks like it would be a wash one way or the other costwise between  beverage cans or commercial siding, but I'll have a better sense of that once we build a mock-up and I can estimate the surface area we would need to cover in "corrugated metal."  We had success converting can to siding in the Mik, but, yes, it was tedious.  

       

      I have to sack the house for cardboard.  Mock-up to follow, hopefully sooner rather than later.

       

      Have a great weekend!

      Eric

    • April 30, 2020 6:02 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      @Gap:  A bit more research indicated that, yes, I should have a tank to hold molasses.  This was apparently used locally and exported as fertilizer.  As I see it, this is a multi-storied building with covered cane carrier a suggested.  A covered deck would lead from one side of the facility to the loading track for the finished product to emulate how things were done here.  The one thing I found strange was that for all the water this process used, there are no photos of water towers.  On O'ahu's Ewa Plain, they used Artesian wells, so maybe they just went straight from ground to use?  Or would the water storage have been internal to the mill?

       

      Eric, some pictures of a mill near where I grew up.

       A water tower, water cooling towers, molasses tank

       

       

       

    • May 1, 2020 9:41 AM EDT
    • Perhaps "bin" is not the correct term.  What I am talking about is some sheet steel hung from the trestle with a bit of slope forming a rectangular funnel to concentrate the coal to the center of the unloading bay.  The purpose so that most of the dump goes into a waiting truck below.  Because the trestle is already close to the ground, this device might only hang down a foot or so. In one of the prototype photos you can see that it also extends above the track...

       

      I'm thinking I can bend something from sheet aluminum at work on the brake. Probably in two or four pieces.  I have found a really nice two part adhesive for aluminum that looks like a weld bead if applied carefully to a joint. I'm thinking flat black on the bottom, then a heavy application of rust solution and coal dust on the top.  Paper and shirt cardboard mock ups will be the first step.

    • May 1, 2020 9:16 AM EDT
    • Interesting start to finish.  Thanks for the write up, as you went along.  Look forward to the walkways and ladders.  I'm wondering on bins, I'm kind of leaning toward just dumped piles of coal.  When too much was piled around bents, it would just be shoveled out.  I doubt if organization (meaning the building of bins), time and labor would have been a good use of men and material.  When I built the power plant in the old basement, I used fish tank charcoal filter carbon.  it was a good size, matching the coal in the Bachmann hoppers.

       

    • May 1, 2020 7:36 AM EDT
    • Nice work on a tough area Jon. Though Box was built to aid in the switching of Willow Hill I believe and this therefore an extension of that idea, I think limiting the length of train into Box when switching WH would maintain the forethought you now need for those operations. YMMV 

    • April 30, 2020 11:19 PM EDT
    • This will be a stopping point for a while as I plan out walkways, railings and bins. Track is back in service as of this evening...

       

      The foreground track is the Brunt Coal siding. It can accommodate 2 wood hoppers or a wood hopper and a 2 bay steel hopper. A single 3 bay could be unloaded in stages by moving it around the trestle.

       

      The next track back is presently the main. I did include a bin area to accommodate one 3 bay hopper...

       

       

      I need to determine if this will actually be an spot for Brunt Coal. Having this tail clear allows me to pull the entire contents of the long siding at Willow Hill. If a car is spotted here it might need to be moved first before Willow Hill can be serviced. That might be a bit weird as it's two "towns" away.

       

      View from track level...

       

      Might be time for a vacation from my vacation :D

       

    • April 30, 2020 10:53 PM EDT
    • and just that easy the little gap has disappeared into the background!!! looks great! Wish I had a basement!

    • April 30, 2020 9:22 PM EDT
    • Sean McGillicuddy said:

      looks great ...are you going to add walkways ?

      Yes, eventually there will be walkways, railings, a ladder and and some bins. For now I have reached my goal of getting the track operational again. As weather improves I'll be shifting foocus to outside, but this is still a great place to mess with on rainy days and evenings.  Plenty to keep me busy for weeks to come!