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  • Topic: Rebuilding an Accucraft Mogul for my SPRy

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    • January 29, 2019 2:40 AM EST
      • Boechingen, Germany
         
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      Hello, now the loco is ready for radio control!

      It took me some time to figure out how and where I could place the servos for the radio control. Finally I found the solution by getting rid of the Johnson bar and turning the reversing-servo upside down. The regulator servo is placed upright and is mounted in a self-made bracket, bend from sheet steel. The lever is sticking out from the back of the cab, but this is okay. It allows more clearance between the servo and the boiler. Just beside the servo is the cut out for the reverser servo.

      Left of the lubricator is the reversing servo, which got installed upside down. The third servo to the right is for the whistle.

      As there was no space left for the receiver (the gas tank will take place on the firemans side), I moved the reveiver to the tender. The nine wires of the servos were wrapped in some heat shrink and bend to end under the cab floor in-between the frame.

      Here I installed some simple PBC with a 5-pole socket and I combined all red wires to pin 1 and all black wires to pin 5, while pins 2-4 are used for the orange signal wires.

      The tender got the matching cable with plug at the end.

      To connect the cable with the receiver, I installed the typical plugs at the ends. So it’s easy to change channels if necessary. At least I installed the power switch and made a battery pack ready. Usually I install a charging socket as well, but I won’t carry the large loco to the charging station each time. So I made the battery pack removable by plug & socket.

      Beside the Rc components, I installed a T-connector with whistle valve between the manifold and the pressure gauge. Unfortunately, I missed to take photos from the progress, but the finished parts are shown in the 3rd photo above. I also swapped the pressure gauge to a 1/2″ diam. gauge. At least I installed a new safety valve. Unfortunately, the weather is bad outside, so I was not able to do test runs yet under steam, but on air, everythign worked fine so far.

      Gerd

    • February 5, 2019 2:57 AM EST
      • Boechingen, Germany
         
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      Hello,

      today I’ve the latest progress on the tender rebuild.

      First I added some U channel to the front end of the tender body to add wooden boards which will hold the coal load in place.

      The coal bunker on top was made from wood and is hold in place by a push-fit. This allows easy access to the receiver and battery inside the tender. The water hatch at the back was made from brass and copper, together with some Ozark parts.

      While adding more details to the tender top, I painted the main body and mounted it on top of the chassis.

      To model the coal, I used some decoration pellets which had the perfect size, but the wrong color. But this got fixed quickly with some paint.

      And here’s the finished tender together with the loco. Still missing is the rear head light and lettering as well as some details.

      That’s it for today, Gerd

    • February 12, 2019 2:18 AM EST
      • Boechingen, Germany
         
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      Hello, here's the final report on this project.

      Since I was not able to get a second headlight which matched the already installed one, I decide to make two new headlights from stock. The parts are made on the lathe and mill.




      To mount the headlight on the tender, I also made a small pedestal from sheet brass.



      I also added the lettering to the tender and some detail parts like the re-rail frogs. Now the tender is complete and I can start the final tasks on the loco itself.


      First re moved the paint from the cab to fill in all the holes and cut-outs made by the previous owner. I started with screw-holes on the back. I soldered pieces of brass wire into the holes and filed them flush.


      Some more work was needed on the larger cut-outs.


      Here I inserted larger segments of brass sheet. Once sanded smoth and painted, they will be barely visible.


      Once all repaits to the cab were finished, I spend another sand-blast and painted the cab black on the outside and green on the inside.


      The roof got also repainted. And here’s the finished loco, fully assembled.

      Cheers, Gerd

    • February 12, 2019 10:10 AM EST
      • Missouri
         
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      All that work did indeed make a handsome little locomotive.

    • February 12, 2019 10:58 AM EST
      • Waverly, Alabama
         
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      That’s a fine looking engine, Gerd.  Your metal working skills are top notch. Thanks for taking us on this journey with you. Would love to see a video of it in action one day. 

      ____________________________________

       

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