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  • Topic: RUNAWAY AUSSIE TRAIN

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    • November 6, 2018 3:09 AM EST
      • KENILWORTH, WARWICKSHIRE UK. (Just up the road from Stratford-Upon-Avon)
         
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      RUNAWAY AUSTRALIAN TRAIN

      London Times newspaper today 6th Nov

       

      A runaway BHP Billiton train loaded with thousands of tonnes of iron ore travelled more than 90km across Western Australia without a driver before being deliberately derailed.

      The world’s largest mining company said that it had suspended its rail operations in the region while an investigation was carried out into the incident early yesterday, which involved a 268-wagon, four-locomotive train.

      This post was edited by Ross Mansell at November 6, 2018 3:10 AM EST
    • November 6, 2018 4:50 AM EST
      • Winmalee, NSW Australia
         
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      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-06/investigators-visit-runaway-bhp-iron-ore-train-derailment-site/10469802

    • November 6, 2018 11:23 AM EST
      • KENILWORTH, WARWICKSHIRE UK. (Just up the road from Stratford-Upon-Avon)
         
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      Mick Benton said:

      https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-06/investigators-visit-runaway-bhp-iron-ore-train-derailment-site/10469802

      THAT is going to cost a packet!........

    • November 6, 2018 1:36 PM EST
      • Smoggy L.A., Left Coast
         
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      Only four engines and about two dozen ore cars, derailed out in the middle of nowhere, not a toxic or flammable cargo, salvageable cargo, no injuries or deaths....got off extremely lightly all things considered.

      ____________________________________
      Have fun with your trains
    • November 6, 2018 5:01 PM EST

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      I don't understand how this was possible. Under Australian rail safety laws, the locos would have had to have a "dead man's switch" to automatically stop the train if the driver was no longer controlling it. In days gone by this used to be a foot pedal which the driver had to keep pressed otherwise the brakes were automatically applied. It was hard to keep pressed so some drivers used to put a brick or similar on it which defeated the purpose. However I understand that modern locos (which these were) have a button which the driver has to press in response to a light illuminating at random intervals. There was nobody in the cab so why did this not stop the train?

      Regards

      Peter Lucas

      MyLocoSound

    • November 6, 2018 6:04 PM EST
      • Vail, Az
         
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      Peter it's a private line and not subject to interchange rules. From mine to smelter and back. Think of all the money saved pinching that penny.

      ____________________________________

      John

       

      The older I get, the less I know, please don't make me prove it.

       

       

    • November 6, 2018 6:22 PM EST
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      I worked with a ex locomotive engineer many years ago. He told me that one of the first things engineers do to a new locomotive, is they figure out how to defeat the "dead man's switch".

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • November 6, 2018 9:32 PM EST
      • Branchport, NY
         
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      Peter Lucas said:

      I don't understand how this was possible. Under Australian rail safety laws, the locos would have had to have a "dead man's switch" to automatically stop the train if the driver was no longer controlling it. In days gone by this used to be a foot pedal which the driver had to keep pressed otherwise the brakes were automatically applied. It was hard to keep pressed so some drivers used to put a brick or similar on it which defeated the purpose. However I understand that modern locos (which these were) have a button which the driver has to press in response to a light illuminating at random intervals. There was nobody in the cab so why did this not stop the train?

      Regards

      Peter Lucas

      MyLocoSound

      Peter

      Did you ever see the movie "Failsafe"?

      It was about a fail safe nuclear bomb system.

      It is an old black & white movie, but was pretty good and showed what could happen.

      Tom

       

    • November 6, 2018 9:46 PM EST
      • Peoria, NW of Phoenix, Arizona
         
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      My nephew said in training as an engineer several old heads would get a ballast rock and duct tape it to the deadman’s button , keeping it depressed. 

      ____________________________________

       

      Butt Modeler #2

       

       

    • November 7, 2018 8:49 AM EST
      • Lancaster , Ohio
         
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      No matter what, nothing can be made to be totally idiot proof !

    • November 7, 2018 9:04 PM EST
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      That's because idiots can be so darn creative.

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • November 8, 2018 3:42 AM EST
      • KENILWORTH, WARWICKSHIRE UK. (Just up the road from Stratford-Upon-Avon)
         
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      Did not someone once say.." You show me the foolproof device and I will show you the fool"   ?  

    • November 8, 2018 4:06 AM EST
      • Tingewick, Buckinghamshire
         
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      In essence it does not sound too dissimilar to this incident https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42548824. Ok , the train was parked up on an incline involved in that one but the rest of the chain of events and listed contributory factors may end up having a faintly familiar ring.

       

      That or this is a secret "Autonomous Train" test fail. What was that about penny pinching corporations ? You never know.

      This post was edited by Max Winter at November 8, 2018 4:09 AM EST
    • November 8, 2018 9:37 AM EST
      • high desert California
         
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      Hell of a wreck  . . . . 

    • November 10, 2018 1:15 PM EST
      • Pinon Hills, California
         
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      I am glad they were able to get it off the tracks! What a mess though!

    • November 11, 2018 9:48 PM EST

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      Holy moly, that's quite a wreck!

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