Forum Sponsorsss


Forums General General Discussion
  • Topic: Tunnel tube minimum diameter

    Back To Topics
    (0 rates)
    • October 5, 2017 6:39 PM EDT
      • Chaco, Paraguay
         
      • Posts
        2,207
      • Thanks
        69
      • Thanked
        88
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      with THAT diameter you could send in kids to retrieve derailed trains...

      ____________________________________

       

      My Chaosplace ->  

    • October 5, 2017 8:40 PM EDT
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
      • Posts
        12,322
      • Thanks
        322
      • Thanked
        220
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Korm Kormsen said:

      with THAT diameter you could send in kids to retrieve derailed trains...

      Well, that idea did cross my mind at the time, but now the kids have all grown - even my youngest niece is a teenager.

      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

    • October 5, 2017 9:43 PM EDT
      • Berkshire, Ma.
         
      • Posts
        639
      • Thanks
        84
      • Thanked
        31
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Eric if you are thinking of using clay chimney flue paint it or seal it some how. A large scalier hear in New England used one and in 2 years just crumbled. Just my opinion.

      Richard

    • October 6, 2017 8:37 AM EDT
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
      • Posts
        12,322
      • Thanks
        322
      • Thanked
        220
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Richard Beverly said:

      Eric if you are thinking of using clay chimney flue paint it or seal it some how. A large scalier hear in New England used one and in 2 years just crumbled. Just my opinion.

      Richard

      Good to know.  I've considered using flue pipe as a tunnel liner under masonry stairs at my front door to allow me to expand along the front of the house. That plan has been very low to develop and was nixed last weekend when I repaired the steps once again with 250 pounds of concrete mix. I'd really rather build a wooden deck and get rid of the masonry steps, but then ground clearance becomes an issue bringing the trains underneath.

      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

    • October 6, 2017 8:56 AM EDT
      • Kittery, ME
         
      • Posts
        158
      • Thanks
        11
      • Thanked
        29
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Well, this whole project has just gone back to the drawing board.  I did some more detailed measurements, and determined that a pipe that I can't relocate runs about 6" above where the bottom of the tunnel would be.  I'm going to have to go through a different wall, and that one is wood.  So that'll be easy, but the outdoor routing will be more challenging.  Thanks for all the advice.  Hopefully someone else will benefit from the discussion down the road.  

    • October 6, 2017 10:30 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
      • Posts
        8,881
      • Thanks
        47
      • Thanked
        383
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Richard Beverly said:

      Eric if you are thinking of using clay chimney flue paint it or seal it some how. A large scalier hear in New England used one and in 2 years just crumbled. Just my opinion.

      Richard

      I guess that depends on the type of liner, amount of ground contact, moisture and who knows what else. We have 3 of them set vertically in our front flower bed, as small planter boxes. They have been there, with their bottoms buried in the ground, full of soil and plants, for several years now, and they are still quite solid.

       

      ____________________________________

      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • October 6, 2017 1:29 PM EDT
      • Fort Myers Beach & Annapolis, Florida & Maryland
         
      • Posts
        1,459
      • Thanks
        13
      • Thanked
        66
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Richard Beverly said:

      Eric if you are thinking of using clay chimney flue paint it or seal it some how. A large scalier hear in New England used one and in 2 years just crumbled. Just my opinion.

      Richard

      That one wasn't fired.  Chimney flue has to handle acids, heat, etc., so it is cooked terracotta type.  I used a 9" ID flue (3 x 2' pieces) in my garden in Maryland, near the water where it was always wet and had no problems with it.

      ____________________________________

       

        Pete

    • October 6, 2017 1:36 PM EDT
      • Missouri
         
      • Posts
        1,908
      • Thanks
        75
      • Thanked
        79
      • Reputation
        Neutral

      "Tunnel tube minimum diameter" topic heading was initially registered by my brain as Tunnel tube minimum disaster.  That too would make an interesting thread but railroading life would probably be happier without it, ya know.

    • October 6, 2017 1:45 PM EDT
      • Carlsbad, CA
         
      • Posts
        6,160
      • Thanks
        77
      • Thanked
        271
      • Reputation
        Respected

      The ones I have seen were all fired... hard to believe someone would sell unfired flues for a chimney... hmm...

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • October 6, 2017 9:49 PM EDT
      • Berkshire, Ma.
         
      • Posts
        639
      • Thanks
        84
      • Thanked
        31
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Clearly anyone that has quoted me has not experienced the New England freeze and thaw, freeze and thaw, that is why i said NEW ENGLAND and the last i know Me. was part of New England. This was a fired flu. I know another G scaler that uses freeze thaw to crack large rocks into small rocks.

      Richard

    • October 6, 2017 10:34 PM EDT
      • Carlsbad, CA
         
      • Posts
        6,160
      • Thanks
        77
      • Thanked
        271
      • Reputation
        Respected

      Well, if using the tile flue, which the ones I have seen are clay based, it surely could not harm anything to saturate it with sealer, would be cheap insurance, compared to the cost and labor involved.

       

       

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • October 7, 2017 8:41 AM EDT
      • Candlewood Valley, Connecticut
         
      • Posts
        12,322
      • Thanks
        322
      • Thanked
        220
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Richard Beverly said:

      Clearly anyone that has quoted me has not experienced the New England freeze and thaw, freeze and thaw, that is why i said NEW ENGLAND and the last i know Me. was part of New England. This was a fired flu. I know another G scaler that uses freeze thaw to crack large rocks into small rocks.

      Richard

      For sure Richard. Even reinforced concrete can disintegrate over time here in New England. All it takes is a small crack for water intrusion.  I've re-poured my front steps with concrete twice since we moved here in 1990. Ice melter doesn't help, but that is a necessity too unless you enjoy cracking your skull on the concrete.  I use concrete stepping stones as weights on my boat cover. They are pretty porous and only last two seasons or so before they crumble.

      ____________________________________

      www.cvsry.com www.cvsry.com

    • October 9, 2017 12:41 PM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
      • Posts
        3,242
      • Thanks
        434
      • Thanked
        95
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      That why I use  the lasted rage in drainage.. 

       

      ____________________________________

       My you-tube

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • October 9, 2017 5:24 PM EDT
      • Berkshire, Ma.
         
      • Posts
        639
      • Thanks
        84
      • Thanked
        31
      • Reputation
        Well Respected

      Sean McGillicuddy said:

      That why I use  the lasted rage in drainage.. 

       

      Yeah Sean that is what I have, but the stuff I have has a smooth liner grandson could crawl thru it.

      Richard

    • October 9, 2017 6:26 PM EDT
      • Carlsbad, CA
         
      • Posts
        6,160
      • Thanks
        77
      • Thanked
        271
      • Reputation
        Respected

      One advantage of the flue liner, is that being available in a rectangular shape, it's more optimized for trains, you could use a 12" flue pipe that was 6" wide if space was a concern, a perfectly round tube would need 14" or more because of the curve on top and whatever base you use to make the bottom flat... the track cannot sit exactly in the bottom.

       

      Of course these are only distinctions when space is tight, or you don't care you are excavating a ditch twice as wide...

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • October 11, 2017 12:06 PM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, PA
         
      • Posts
        146
      • Thanks
        0
      • Thanked
        0
      • Reputation
        Neutral

      Todd Haskins said:

      I have 3 tunnels on the RR where I used 12x12 flue liners. They come in 2' long sections. I have another where I used a length of black corrugated pipe.  There is a spot on the RR that goes under our addition and it is pretty tight under there but I can crawl in if needed.   I put together PT 2x4 to form a "T" beam and it has held up well for 10 years now.

       

      Here is a youtube link to one of my videos that might inspire you a bit.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_fPQ0LlKhU&t=190s

       

      Even if you are planning on modelling in 1:29 you will want to overbuild for additional clearance.  I have a lift out girder bridge that was built to fit my widest train and it was all good until a friend brought over his large Bachmann loco and guess what, it didn't fit.  

       

      Steve is so correct in saying that you need to make sure you can reach into a tunnel because if something bad is going to happen it will happen out of your reach !  LOL

      You have an awesome layout. Any chance you know someone with a drone that could take an aria view of the whole layout?

Forums General General Discussion

    Icon Legend

  • Topic has replies
    Hot topic
    Topic unread
    Topic doesn't have any replies
    Closed topic
    BBCode  is enabled
    HTML  is enabled

Add Reputation

Do you want to add reputation for this user by this post?

or cancel

Ads by Google