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  • Topic: 1/8th scale Baldwin Westinghouse Electric Freight Motor

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    • March 15, 2019 11:26 PM EDT
      • Southern Oregon
         
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      Very cool stuff Gary, your ability using those programs astounds me.  Just out of curiosity how does riding behind that locomotive work out with that trolley poll sticking back in your  face?

    • March 16, 2019 1:50 AM EDT
      • Burbank, CA
         
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      Rick Marty said:

      Very cool stuff Gary, your ability using those programs astounds me.  Just out of curiosity how does riding behind that locomotive work out with that trolley poll sticking back in your  face?

      Rick,

      I have been using MasterCam since about 1992 or 1993. The last die shop I worked for before my retirement wanted to get into NC milling of forging dies. So the owner and I decided we needed to learn the software so when he purchased a new Haas horizontal CNC mill ($150K+ investment), we had no choice but to take the risk and get it done. Lots of head scratching for a year or so, lots of frustration during the learning curve (lost some money along the way. But eventually everything "clicked" and we were on our way. Never looked back. I have been convinced to try Fusion 360 from a number of folks on the Chaski (Home Machinist website) and quite a few vendors that sell detail 3D printed parts for the ride-on scales. The Fair Weather Foundry back in Kent, Ohio is owned by a guy named Marty Pinkston. He started using 360 a few years ago to make molds for detail parts in 1" and 1.5" scale stuff. He was the one that cast our louvered doors for these Baldwin engines using ONLY a photo I provided of the prototype. The technology just "begs" to be used now. And because the software is free to hobbyists, you really can't pass it up. I actually needed BOTH software products to get what I showed in the previous post. I am faster in drawing in MasterCam than 360. And I can surface a part faster in MC. But 360 gives me the ability to get the files converted to a format that Shapeways or any other 3D vendor can use. They are all just "tools" and I use what I feel most comfortable with. &5 is "probably" a little late to be learning this stuff, but it does keep the "gray matter" from decomposing!

      As far as the trolley pole getting in your face when running these engines, the fact of the matter is that the trolley wheel on the end of the pole sits just above the center of the rear coupler. Never gets in the way. The total length of the finished pole is a little over 26 inches. Take a look at the first photo of the prototype #1624 engine and you can see that it falls short of the end of the locomotive. So that is not an issue.

    • March 16, 2019 8:15 AM EDT
      • KENILWORTH, WARWICKSHIRE UK. (Just up the road from Stratford-Upon-Avon)
         
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      Great set of posts. Great work!

      As a one time model engineer I just love ''em . 

    • March 16, 2019 8:31 AM EDT
      • west of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      Gary,  I have thoroughly enjoyed following this project and the detailed description of each phase of it that you have posted. The craftsmanship on this project is marveled only by the way that you presented it.

    • March 18, 2019 10:10 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
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      Man ...He's good @ this Ha ! ....  How much is left for this engine?

      ____________________________________

       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

    • March 18, 2019 1:24 PM EDT
      • Burbank, CA
         
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      Sean McGillicuddy said:

      Man ...He's good @ this Ha ! ....  How much is left for this engine?

       

      Sean,

      My wife keeps asking me this same question......."maybe" six months to complete. Depends on the PE trolley pole castings. Still waiting for a response from Marty Pinkston at Fairweather Foundry in Kent, Ohio. We are hoping that the castings will show the detail we want for this engine. I will be discussing the molds with the owner of the foundry because some of these castings involve multi-level "parting lines" and locks. I will do a drawing in MasterCam to show what the molds will look like and post them. Lots of "die design" experience needed to do this correctly. BTW, thanks for the comment :).

       

    • March 18, 2019 2:39 PM EDT
      • Burbank, CA
         
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      While waiting for the response from our foundry on the trolley pole castings, I started the milling machine work on the cast aluminum louver door panel castings we received from the same foundry late last year. There is a small edge that gets milled into the casting so it will fit the same opening in our sheet steel hoods. Because there are four of these panels per engine and all of them have to fit the same rectangular holes, it's always best to make a "fixture" to hold the part. No guess work on location for multiple parts. I have eight panels to do for TWO engines, so the fixture was mandatory.

       

      Photo below is a screenshot of the fixture with the template of my mill table embedded in the drawing. This helps with the locations of hold down clamps and bolts for both the fixture and the part. Make the "mistakes" on the computer, not in the shop :)!

       

      Then go out in the shop and make the fixture and attach to the mill table.

      Fixture is just a "quick and dirty" build. I used 3/4 poplar, machined BOTH sides flat and true. Machined a nice "match edge" on one side so it lines up the same way each time the fixture is put on the mill table.

       

      Used my pin nailer to fasten two match strips to the fixure while it was still setup and took a "skinny cut on the match strips so they are exactly square and poerpendiculat to each other. No guess work this way. Tried the louver casting and sits nice and square in the fixture.

       

      The small amount of shimming used UNDER the casting is so that the FACE of the louver casting is straight and true to the hood opening.. I do the long cut first and then use the side clamps to hold the part. Remove the end clamps and proceed to mill the end flats. By using the dial readings on the mill, each part is indentical.

       

      Thusly :)......

       

      First panel tried and fit in place. Just seven more to go. Have those finished tomorrow.

       

      This post was edited by Gary Armitstead at March 19, 2019 6:41 AM EDT
    • March 19, 2019 10:28 AM EDT
      • Easton , Massachusetts
         
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      Gary it looks like you're still having fun ... using tools and working on train related things..

      Very nice work ..

      This post was edited by Sean McGillicuddy at March 19, 2019 10:29 AM EDT
      ____________________________________

       My u-tube  My Vimeo

      The light in the tunnel might not be an engine , but a light in the caboose of my own train on my Roundy Round Rail Road !    My empire is complete...I think...

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