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  • Topic: Casting resins and molds

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    • April 16, 2017 12:32 PM EDT

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      I use the polypropelene cooking measuring cups found in places like Dollar General. I can use the graduated marks for measuring, use the spout for pour and when residue sets it pops out as the resins will not adhere to the polypropelene. this makes them reusable. They are available in 1,2 and four cup sizes. For very large quantities i.e. multiple molds I use the 2 quart drink dispensers. Very cheap. 

    • April 16, 2017 12:35 PM EDT

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      I use the polypropelene cooking measuring cups found in places like Dollar General. I can use the graduated marks for measuring, use the spout for pour and when residue sets it pops out as the resins will not adhere to the polypropelene. this makes them reusable. They are available in 1,2 and four cup sizes. For very large quantities i.e. multiple molds I use the 2 quart drink dispensers. Very cheap. 

    • April 18, 2017 8:33 AM EDT
      • Central, Kansas
         
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      Travis Dague said:

         I have been doing some resin casting the last few months. I am using resins from Moldputty.com  Amazing resin. What I was wondering if there is any other resin out there that is thinner in viscosity when mixed together. I would like to find something that will pour into the mold cavity easier and prevent air pockets occurring. I thought somewhere I read that you could heat up the resin, however I haven't tried this. I would think it would speed up the curing and setting process of the resin being cast. Anyone have thoughts on any of this?......

      Are you using anything as a release agent, or pouring directly into clean molds? I've had good luck pouring small (and I mean TINY) objects using the Alumite consumer resin from Hirst Art molds using talcum as a release agent. It seems to help get the resin into all the little spots/corners. These are things like 1:24 cups, plates, and books. I don't vibrate or do anything else to get air our of them. But these are open molds, without spurs, etc.

    • April 18, 2017 9:27 AM EDT

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      Raw Material Supply and I am sure a lot of others sell a spray mold releases that I find work very well. I generally do not use it on new RTV molds, but purchase their "thinned resin for intricate molds such as people. I use the spray release on older molds and for my canoes and kayaks that use polyester/fiberglass or epoxy rigid molds.  They also offer the resins in various set times so you can purchase slower set time resins or RTV for your more intricate projects.

      One of the problems hobbiest often have is the offerings from craft houses is that they offer products such as Alumilite  which is a medium viscosity catch all product. these, although are available in small quantities, are often very difficult to work with as they are designed to catch all hobbiest.

      An internet search will produce a host of companies that sell to the small commercial model maker/artist market. Most sell 'test kits' that are very small volume suited for the hobby modeler. Granted they are slightly more expensive than the hobby kits. But, is it not worth spending a few cents more the have a model you are proud of vs 'well it will do' product after all your effort. Also, these distributors are specialist dealing with artist and commercial model makers only thus have lots of experience and can suggest the right product for our project vs the craft shop where it is an off the shelf item along with a whole host of craft supplies.   

    • April 19, 2017 3:15 PM EDT
      • Paraguay
         
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      thomas prevost said:...

      An internet search will produce a host of companies that sell to the small commercial model maker/artist market. Most sell 'test kits' that are very small volume suited for the hobby modeler. ...  

      you don't happen to have a link or two for those (like me) too dumb to find those companies by themselves?

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    • April 21, 2017 12:39 PM EDT

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      One of the best sites for advanced hobbiest is Specialtyresins.com.(Speccialty resins and chemical llc) They offer a complete line of eurethane  monomers fast to slow(12 minutes) various hardness i.e. hard for buildings  medium for casting things like people and very soft for molds, Extremely helpful Price reasonable. about $20 quart, UScomposites.com offers epoxy and polyester monomers. The metal catalyzed epoxies are nontoxic and can be used indoors. Both the polyester and epoxies using styrene are very toxic and should only be used by professionals.  Rawmaterialsupply.com is a good source of RTV and eurethane. Many of these products can be purchased locally.  The "bartop coating" sold at Ace, Home Depot is a metal catalyzed epoxy that can easily be cast, Home Depot and all auto stores sell polyester by the pint or gallon. It can be cast although somewhat brittle. it is very strong, BUT MUST BE USED OUT DOORS OR WITH GOOD VENTILATION. AS  side note, I have made small molds containing small barrels, boxes, ties, and flower boxes, lanterns crossing signs, etc. When doing larger castings, I fill them with the excess, not wasting any resin. I then give them to anyone in the club who desires them. once molds are made, casting resins can be fun, and easily done as a quick project (1hr). Hope this helps.

    • April 23, 2017 6:42 AM EDT
      • Paraguay
         
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      yes, it helps. thank you!

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