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    • February 25, 2017 9:42 PM EST
      • Cleveland, , Mississippi
         
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      Scale for amusement park train

      What would be the best scale for an amusement park train ride, N scale or Z scale? Thanks.

    • February 25, 2017 10:59 PM EST
      • Vail, Az
         
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      For an Amusement Park, you'd need to placate the liability and you'll need enclosed riders, looking at my small collection, HOn3 cars might be wide enough for a 120.3 butt.

      Live Steamers can be those scales you mentioned.

       

      John

    • February 26, 2017 1:14 AM EST
      • Smoggy L.A., Left Coast
         
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      HO considering that most amusement park train rides tend to be 12"-15" gauge, cut openings in the tops of the cars and set the riders inside.

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    • February 26, 2017 5:15 AM EST

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      I'd go with HO like Vic said. For a couple reasons. One being that a little ways from here in Sedalia is a park train of about 15 to 18 inch gauge. I don't have the pictures from a couple years back in this several months old computer and didn't put them online. They have an E8-ish looking diesel with cars based on smooth side streamline cars, which I recall being narrower and a bit lower than the UP in Vic's photo, and a live steam 4-4-0 of chunky foreshortenend proportion with a 19-0h-something builders plate.

      Setup even has what might be called a "scale" water tower. I'm not sure if it is operational or static display. There might even be a "scale" signal or two, maybe?

      Be careful of the rabbit hole, Gn15 is a whole hobby in and of itself

      HO gauge track comes out around 15 to 18 inch gauge depending on what flavor of G scale is used.

      Which means there are some appropriate parts available, on Shapeways is one place I know of; parts for both prototypical farm, estate, and industrial trams, and more fanciful freelance creations.

      these images from 1905 might be at least of entertainment value.

      "New York circa 1905. "The miniature railway, Coney Island." 8x10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. "
      http://www.shorpy.com/node/8016

      http://www.shorpy.com/node/8367

      http://www.shorpy.com/node/13260

      Here's a unique 4-4-0 cab to model http://www.legeros.com/ralwake/photos/weblog/pivot/entry.php?id=349 and http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/5105293/

      Gotta love this 4-4-0s one truck tender

      https://www.realtown.com/ArianaZariah/blog/easteregghunt2009

      And a realyl mongrelized real life kitbash of a park train locomotive, http://www.montgomeryparks.org/enterprise/park_facilities/trains/miniature_trains.shtm

      A centercab internal combustion loco which could be a fun kitbash of an HO something.

      http://www.therecordherald.com/article/20130817/NEWS/130819904

      some handsome steamers & a B&W work tran from who knows when. Hose reel is worth modeling

      http://www.redwoodvalleyrailway.com/5173.html

      http://www.eastbayloop.com/tilden-park-steam-trains/

      Great, to me, image of loco with engineer and cylinders blowing

      http://blog.sfgate.com/parenting/2011/04/11/broke-guy-day-care-best-family-friendly-train-rides-in-the-bay-area/

      Halfway down this page is good enlargable image of filling tender water, and backhead details
      https://hammondcast.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/jon-hammond-journal-for-day-july-16-2012-report/

      For more Ideas, a bewildering array of ideas, Google park train, starting with images.

      Park trains, too are a hobby in and of themselves.

      This post was edited by Forrest Scott Wood at March 5, 2017 8:41 AM EST
    • February 27, 2017 7:10 PM EST
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      I could see HO but an argument could be made for N. 1/8th scale seems like it would be close to N. But for a true amusement park attraction probably HO so passengers are "in" cars and not "on" cars.great Northern and Cascade Railway

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    • February 27, 2017 8:21 PM EST
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      http://forum.gn15.info/

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      and King Butt Modeler

    • February 27, 2017 8:55 PM EST
      • Southern Illinois
         
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      I did some On30 stuff on HO track for a mine and felt it turned out good.  I also put some 1:20.3 characters on a riding car, made from a bulkhead flat behind HO engines.  Had it all at the ECLSTS one year.  There may be a couple pictures out there somewhere.  Experiment, looking at comparison pictures. 

       

    • February 28, 2017 12:15 AM EST
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Ric brings up a good point. Another consideration is what are you modeling in large scale. What would look right in 1:32 or 1:29 might look very small in 1:20.3.

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    • March 1, 2017 5:30 PM EST
      • Peoria, Arizona
         
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      oh now this is opening a very large genie out of a bottle, which may never be shoved back inside. I remember one RR I toured here a few years ago had I think it was a Z scale "g scale garden RR" on a raised platform behind one of the houses. MUST     NOT     LOOK     INTO     THE    LIGHT, stay on the main track, avoid the rabbit hole.

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      Butt Modeler #2

       

       

    • March 1, 2017 5:55 PM EST

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      Pete Lassen said:

      oh now this is opening a very large genie out of a bottle, which may never be shoved back inside. I remember one RR I toured here a few years ago had I think it was a Z scale "g scale garden RR" on a raised platform behind one of the houses. MUST     NOT     LOOK     INTO     THE    LIGHT, stay on the main track, avoid the rabbit hole.

      The Mason-Dixon model railroaders have a modular layout, and one module has the z-scale garden railroad you mention.  I had a photo once.

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        Pete

    • March 1, 2017 10:50 PM EST
      • Cleveland, , Mississippi
         
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      Isn't HO a little large? Seems like N would be more to the correct size.

       

    • March 1, 2017 11:35 PM EST

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      Nope, HO is just right for a 15 to 18 inch gauge ride-on/in park train.

      IMG_5171 by Forrest Wood, on Flickr

      IMG_5172 by Forrest Wood, on Flickr

      IMG_5175 by Forrest Wood, on Flickr

      IMG_5173 by Forrest Wood, on Flickr

       

      Here's a park train creation of mine, which someday, maybe, will get finished? Still need to do cars for it.

      Is on mechanism of HO scale 4-wheel Plymouth DDT by Model Power. Guy is 1/24 scale by Fujimi, I think, is from a kit of car drivers and mechanics.

      This post was edited by Forrest Scott Wood at March 1, 2017 11:51 PM EST
    • March 2, 2017 9:24 AM EST
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Pete Lassen said:

      oh now this is opening a very large genie out of a bottle, which may never be shoved back inside. I remember one RR I toured here a few years ago had I think it was a Z scale "g scale garden RR" on a raised platform behind one of the houses. MUST     NOT     LOOK     INTO     THE    LIGHT, stay on the main track, avoid the rabbit hole.

      Check out TT. Would make a very nice garden railroad. Z is big. TT comes out almost perfect for g scale in g scale.

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    • March 2, 2017 9:28 AM EST
      • Post Falls, Idaho
         
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      Forrest's pictures make the argument that HO would be more ideal for an amusement park train. They are going to be more ride "in" than ride "on". N would definitely be better for the smaller ride "on" train like the one I mentioned above. So choose your poison.

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    • March 2, 2017 11:26 AM EST

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      Thing to keep in mind, if one isn't already, is that 'park train' is a term with a defined meaning. Also used is 'miniature railway'.

      "Park trains are small gauge trains running in amusement parks, city parks and other public areas. Park trains usually have gauges larger than 7-1/2" but smaller than 3 feet. 12", 15", 18" and 30" gauges are common. "

      http://www.railroaddata.com/rrlinks/Park_Trains/

      This is an interesting conversation;

      "My question is this: If this 2' gauge railroad had "real" locomotives, for example, Baldwins or Alcos, and ran doubleheaders hauling beets or sugar cane during harvest season, people would come from everywhere to take photos.

      But for some reason, because the engines were built to haul people in an amusement park, they're not "real" and nobody cares. Can anyone explain that to me?

      I also run standard gauge steam, and it's funny, aside from the size, there's not much difference. They all work about the same, and produce power in roughly the same way, even those oddball geared engines, though they do it in a round-about manner.

      Why is it that park trains are the Rodney Dangerfield of steam? Yes, I understand the disdain for CP Huntingtons and the like, and it's hard to look macho at the controls of a G-16. But why do the steamers get lumped into that group as well?"

      http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=32198

      This from last page of thread,

      "JR May wrote:

      > BTW a number of our engineers have gone on to work for "the real" railroads over the years.

      In some ways, you might say that park railroading (I suspect that is a new term) is perhaps something like AAA baseball. A lot of young guys, and gals, got their start running at places like Pine Creek or Cedar Point and moved on up tonnage wise to some full sized railroading.
      J.R.


      I would think not only park railroading, but some heritage railroads would produce excellent railroaders. Think of how challenging some heritage roads can be, particularly Cumbres & Toltec with its 4% grades, and Cass Scenic which averages 5% and hits 8% and even 11%.

      I would think if you could railroad on either of those roads, you could railroad anywhere."

    • March 2, 2017 1:48 PM EST
      • Fontana, California
         
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      HO seems a little large to my eye as well. If your wanting a true live steamers look I believe N scale will work the best.

       

    • March 2, 2017 2:44 PM EST
      • YYC, CANADA
         
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      The general consensus up here is TT   for G within a G gauge layout

      N for a ride-on  within a G gauge layout.

       

      Every yr. at our show over the two days,  the subject is  'revisited'  at some point   in conversation btwn attendees and exhibitors   :)

       

       

      doug c

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    • March 2, 2017 3:44 PM EST

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      Did you mean what you said? Z is bigger than TT? I think you meant to say "T" scale, not "TT" which is closer to HO.

      TT is 1:120

      Z is 1:220

      T is 1:450

       

      Greg

      Devon Sinsley said:
      Pete Lassen said:

      oh now this is opening a very large genie out of a bottle, which may never be shoved back inside. I remember one RR I toured here a few years ago had I think it was a Z scale "g scale garden RR" on a raised platform behind one of the houses. MUST     NOT     LOOK     INTO     THE    LIGHT, stay on the main track, avoid the rabbit hole.

      Check out TT. Would make a very nice garden railroad. Z is big. TT comes out almost perfect for g scale in g scale.

       

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    • March 2, 2017 4:53 PM EST
      • Fan of the V & T,
         
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      Such a fun problem you guys have been discussing. Greg, didn't you have a Z layout on a G flatcar?

       

      Anyway, I've tried to hold back from posting this, but now in a moment of weakness I am doing so.

       

       

      This post was edited by Cliff Jennings at March 2, 2017 4:58 PM EST
    • March 2, 2017 5:04 PM EST
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      True, N would better represent the ride on 7 1/4 inch gauge stuff, but many park trains are around 1 foot gauge or so. So HO would better represent them. Its all in being clear what you are trying to represent.

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      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

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