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  • Topic: First time Seeking Advice

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    • May 17, 2017 12:28 PM EDT

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      Jeeze guys, you are impatient even viewing a 20x speed video?

      I thought you guys were retired and have all the time in the world!

      Last time I looked no one was holding a gun to my head saying watch this video.

      Ignore them Nicolas! Keep to your plan!

      Greg

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    • May 17, 2017 1:06 PM EDT
      • Vail, Az
         
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      Gee whiz, I did say please! Some Magic Word that turned out to be!

      I guess I was misled by the title, now there is no advice needed.

      However, Codes may have been challenged by using various codes of pipe. I've been 'forced' to do it repairing old wells, but never documented it ... Please be careful.

      See ya in a couple of weeks. So much for my Super Duper Light-weight Pipe Guider ... into the junk box.

      John

    • May 17, 2017 2:20 PM EDT

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      I actually have been meaning to ask about the guide, I guess I should read back how the pipe guider works...

      Just giving you guys a hard time ha ha! (I don't want Nicolas to slow down to normal speed now!!!)

      Actually, I was thinking that Nicolas might ask Bob to change the thread title to "Layout Build Log" or something, its getting to be a magnum opus!

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • May 17, 2017 4:06 PM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      Initially this was about advice when I started the project last summer. It seemed suitable to post the progress with the actual installation.

       

      As for the jig, I can explain how it was supposed to work.  Initially I planned to use a sledge hammer to put the pipes in. After using it without the jig for the first 20 pipes I realized it was tiring and very hard to do. I wanted something to hold the pipe for me. After a few mental iterations I came up with the jig in the videos.  A wood platform with feet that can be adjusted to get level. Two 1/2 cinder blocks filled with concrete (and some iller). A pipe larger then the 3/4 PVC goes through the cinder blocks. A post level is used to get the PVC vertical. Once vertical I use a combination of the post pounder and sledge hammer to knock it into the ground.  Worked, but was very slow and again, has issues with the pipes still ending up at angles if they are deflected by rocks in the ground.  3/4 Schedule 40 PVC is strong but is pretty flexible and will bend.

       

      I will have the final video soon. I post the progress here, partly for fun, and partly as a teaching experience for anyone else trying my methods.  Very soon you will see me switch to the 1" by 10" masonry bit and drill. I drill 10 inches into the ground, then feed the pipe in the hole and use the post pounder to drive it down. Worked much faster then the jig.

       

      You will also eventually see me having to reinforce the PVC pipes, specifically where parallel rails are to keep the structures in place.  In the final layout, most of the structure is pretty sound, but its likely I will need to add a few 45 degree stabilizing posts. 

       

      There's also the solution I came up with or the rain garden, since I didn't want to pound the very long posts in there.

      This post was edited by Nicolas Teeuwen at May 17, 2017 4:06 PM EDT
    • May 17, 2017 4:39 PM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      I have been working on the shed design for the side yard of my layout. The shed will be about 15 feet wide, tall enough to go from the ground to the height of the trains. It will be about 30 inches wide on the inside, which is enough to have 4 tracks in it. There will be a sliding door on both ends so I can have the rail yard in the back.

      I am trying to decide on the roof design. I am trying to make the building look like a giant train warehouse. So i am favoring a less sloped roof.  Thoughts?

       

      This post was edited by Nicolas Teeuwen at May 17, 2017 4:40 PM EDT
    • May 17, 2017 5:21 PM EDT

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      The flatter the roof, the stronger it needs to be, right? You don't want water pooling and sitting.

      Are those 1x3's in the "roof"?

       

      Greg

       

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • May 17, 2017 9:30 PM EDT
      • Marysville, Kansas
         
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      How much snow do you get where you live?  That is the big factor in roof design and construction.

       

      Chris

    • May 17, 2017 9:50 PM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      Greg Elmassian said:

      The flatter the roof, the stronger it needs to be, right? You don't want water pooling and sitting.

      Are those 1x3's in the "roof"?

       

      Greg

       

      2x4's. I will use thicker plywood for it as well.  I realize the flatter the roof the stronger it needs to be. The blue part is also going to be hinged so I can open the shed up to do things inside.  

       

      Seattle does not get much snow. I also intend to choose a slicker roof covering. I won't be using shingles. I haven't figured out what to use for it yet but something like a rubber membrane similar to what they used on my house. The idea being the shed should try to look as much like a giant warehouse for trains to blend in with the trains as best as possible given its size.

      This post was edited by Nicolas Teeuwen at May 17, 2017 9:51 PM EDT
    • May 18, 2017 2:40 AM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      Day 14, April 19th. I switched to the new method of putting posts into the ground. Using a 1" by 10" long masonry bit to drill pilot holes into the ground.

    • May 18, 2017 8:39 AM EDT
      • Marysville, Kansas
         
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      Roof design is based highly on snow load. With a low snow load, you will be OK with a flatter roof, I wouldn't go with less than a 10 degree slope to ensure the rain water exits in good time.  Your building is also not that wide, so the span between supports is minimal, and that will help a lot.   Your design with 2x4s is overkill and will just lead to the roof being heavy on it's own.  At minimum reduce to a 1x4, but I would easily venture down to a 1x3.  For the plywood, a 1/2" would be plenty.   If you are going to hinge, consider splitting your roof lengthwise into 2 sections to help make it manageable when opening.

       

      Chris

    • May 18, 2017 4:24 PM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      Chris Kieffer said:

      Roof design is based highly on snow load. With a low snow load, you will be OK with a flatter roof, I wouldn't go with less than a 10 degree slope to ensure the rain water exits in good time.  Your building is also not that wide, so the span between supports is minimal, and that will help a lot.   Your design with 2x4s is overkill and will just lead to the roof being heavy on it's own.  At minimum reduce to a 1x4, but I would easily venture down to a 1x3.  For the plywood, a 1/2" would be plenty.   If you are going to hinge, consider splitting your roof lengthwise into 2 sections to help make it manageable when opening.

       

      Chris

      I would make it in halfs, but then I have to worry about the seam between the panels and how to prevent it from leaking. I am also contemplating using some sort of assistance for opening it. Pistons like the kind used on a murphy bed to help with raising up the roof.

      The shallow roof i buitl that I like better for looks is only 2 degrees or so.

    • May 18, 2017 4:36 PM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      So now you are using a drill to make darn sure you puncture whatever is down there.

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      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • May 18, 2017 5:59 PM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      David Maynard said:

      So now you are using a drill to make darn sure you puncture whatever is down there.

      Pretty much. Because the big iron bar wasn't good enough.  Thankfully I know there's nothing to puncture that's 10 inches down.

    • May 18, 2017 6:03 PM EDT

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      In California, everything is supposed to be no less than 18 inches down, and I would suspect your codes are similar, or even deeper considering your climate.

       

      You have not struck oil yet right?

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • May 18, 2017 8:38 PM EDT
      • Marysville, Kansas
         
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      Being in Seattle where it rains 450 days out of the year you are really pushing it with 2 degrees.  The rain won't really load your roof down, but the flatter it gets the slower the rain flows off, then it is much easier to find a place where you don't want it to go.  I'm worried your building isn't wide enough for that flat of a roof to get the water moving.   Increase it to 5 degrees and see what that looks like to you.

       

      Chris

    • May 19, 2017 6:01 AM EDT
      • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
         
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      Seattle where it rains 450 days out of the year

      Ha, it took me a few reads, but I finally caught it. Yes, Seattleites don't tan, we rust.

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      Shannon car Shops
      Home of the infamous leg lamp

      I.A.R.R.R. Member #12

      and King Butt Modeler

    • May 19, 2017 3:06 PM EDT

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      With a top so narrow, I don't see why you need so much slope... 2 degrees would seem adequate.

      For a house roof, yes...

      A long narrow building, no

       

      Greg

      ____________________________________

      Be sure­ to visit ­my site, l­ots of tec­hnical tip­s and modi­fications,­ and you c­an search ­for topics­ and key w­ords.


      ­Click HERE for Greg­'s web sit­e
      PLEASE NOT­E: Please do NOT use private messaging, i­f you have­ a questio­n, feel fr­ee to emai­l me priva­tely, u­se regular­ email onl­y: greg@el­massian.co­m

    • May 20, 2017 2:33 AM EDT
      • Seattle, Washington
         
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      I have reduced the roof parts to 1x3's.  I have gone back to the design of the one with a 10 degree slope. I haven't solidified which one I want to go with yet. The nice part is, being hinged and all, i could try the easier one and if it doesn't work simply build a different one, reusing what I can. I'd probably rather not go that route though. I'll have to wait and see.  The 1x3s reduced size definitely helps give it a more to scale look.

    • May 20, 2017 6:13 PM EDT
      • Marysville, Kansas
         
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      The thing about the flatter roof is when it does snow, it will trap the water as it starts to melt instead of running off.  So those few times a year it does snow and accumulate, the water will melt down and get trapped between the roof and the remaining snow layer.  That will give the water plenty of time to find a place you don't want it to go.   The bit steeper angle will help that out a lot more than you think.  I live in Northern Kansas where it does snow (although not this year) and my house has a low pitch roof.   It takes a lot longer for the snow to melt off my roof than it does my neighbors.

       

      Chris

      This post was edited by Chris Kieffer at May 23, 2017 8:18 PM EDT
    • May 20, 2017 9:06 PM EDT
      • Vail, Az
         
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      How tall are the sides from track level up and how long are your arms? Are you going to be elevated when you try to reach down inside?

      Maybe you should open a side with sliding windows and seal the roof.

       

      I didn't see any diagonals in the walls of your design?

       

      When it gets complicated and the answer doesn't come, I pause and consider alternative methods...

       

      John

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