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    • September 20, 2017 11:39 PM EDT
    • Yea, several F units were rebuilt to be essentially GP38s under the hood. So it kind of makes sense that the E units would also be rebuilt that way.

       

      This is why its best to research the subject, and find out what it actually looked like at the time one wants to portray. Steam locomotives are known for changing over time. Appliances get moved, or replaced with different ones. Paint schemes change. Grab irons are added or removed. And many covered wagons have had their nose doors sealed/removed.

    • September 20, 2017 1:07 PM EDT
    • What is funny is folks who want to model them as they were in regular revenue service...and use current configuration to do so.

      They are now single engine instead of double....with stacks and roof appliances different....and no front door, to name just two big external differences.

      Cab door windows are different, too, if I recall.

      Some wags call them E38-2's.

      TOC

    • September 19, 2017 6:40 AM EDT
    • Well if you had a team that kept you preserved, and replaced your worn out parts, you might be in as good a shape as she is in.

    • September 18, 2017 5:52 PM EDT
    • Bob Hyman said:

      This fine lady and I are about the same age, although I have to admit she's a bit better preserved than I am!

       

      Bob

      Prettier, too..................

    • September 18, 2017 3:56 PM EDT
    • Here are E9 locomotives used in helper service on the UP Heritage Train. From left to right, #951, #963B, and #949. These three are the last of Union Pacific's high-speed diesel-electrics built for service on the famous streamliner and domeliner passenger trains. I was still in grade school when these units left the EMD factory.  Immediately ahead of #949 are auxiliary water cars UPP 814 and UPP 809. I photographed this lash-up at El Reno, Oklahoma on May 5, 2012.

       

       

      Here is a close-up of #949.

       

       

      Although the E9’s and water cars were nice, here is what was on the point (and what I really came to see.)

       

       

      This fine lady and I are about the same age, although I have to admit she's a bit better preserved than I am!

       

      Bob

    • September 18, 2017 7:20 PM EDT
    • David,

      You are correct. I did not measure them as I had no ruler with me. They looked like 1.5 inches but could have been 2 inches!

    • September 18, 2017 7:17 PM EDT
    • David Maynard said:
      Joe Zullo said:
      David Maynard said:

      And this brings to mind a question I have had for a while now. How thick are the doors on those boxcars?

      They looked like 2x4 wood, so 1.5 inches.

       

      Joe, that is kind of what I am thinking. And if we are close, then the doors on many RTR "models" are overly thick.

      1.5" in that era would be a 1.5" not a 2x4

    • September 18, 2017 5:11 PM EDT
    • Joe Zullo said:
      David Maynard said:

      And this brings to mind a question I have had for a while now. How thick are the doors on those boxcars?

      They looked like 2x4 wood, so 1.5 inches.

       

      Joe, that is kind of what I am thinking. And if we are close, then the doors on many RTR "models" are overly thick.

    • September 17, 2017 10:50 PM EDT
    • Joe Zullo said:

      Bob,

      Those photos are about 20 years old? I was just there last month and that rolling stock looks about the same!

       

      Joe,

      Actually, not quite 20 years.  All of these photos were taken on Saturday, February 19, 2000.

      Bob

       

    • September 17, 2017 10:02 PM EDT
    • David Maynard said:

      And this brings to mind a question I have had for a while now. How thick are the doors on those boxcars?

      They looked like 2x4 wood, so 1.5 inches.

       

    • September 17, 2017 9:58 PM EDT
    • And this brings to mind a question I have had for a while now. How thick are the doors on those boxcars?

    • September 17, 2017 9:49 PM EDT
    • Bob,

      Those photos are about 20 years old? I was just there last month and that rolling stock looks about the same!

    • September 17, 2017 1:15 PM EDT
    • Here are a few photos of preserved narrow gauge rolling stock at the Colorado Railroad Museum that I took about twenty years ago.  I have found that prototype photos like these are a great help when building and/or weathering equipment for the garden railroad.

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • September 17, 2017 11:59 AM EDT
    • Thanks for posting .  . . . . 

    • September 17, 2017 11:13 AM EDT
    • I snapped these photos of a few standard gauge boxcars on the dual gauge track in the Antonito, CO yard.  It's amazing how big these things look compared to their narrow gauge counterparts!

       

       

    • September 17, 2017 10:32 AM EDT
    • Add to bucket list - see 4014 running in person

       

    • September 17, 2017 9:48 AM EDT
    • Very cool! Thanks for sharing.

    • September 15, 2017 5:28 PM EDT
    • Just found out an hour ago the tender is probably at the shop in Chehalis, Washington. Also found out the #2 Heisler in the barn...they have another, #4, also a 2-truck, and the third truck outside it to a three truck they yanked out of a ditch someplace and not all of it is in Garibaldi yet. PLUS another Polson Mikado is already en-route (running).

      This place is going to be steam central if they aren't careful.

       

      TOC

    • September 15, 2017 11:45 AM EDT
    • Tank malleys often acquired tenders to extend their range, or to allow the engine tanks to remain full for extra traction or due to the engine tanks rusting out. These usually came from out of service engines.