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    • April 7, 2021 1:13 PM EDT
    • Years ago the ATSF RR had its own accident investigation school which I I tended while working for the FRA.  They even had a pocket manual you could carry around with you.  Being that I also worked for several RR before joining FRA I learned a lot about derailment investigations.  Some derailments are simple to solve others take a bit more to figure out.  The book you listed might be good readying for the novice.  Later RJD

    • March 24, 2021 4:04 AM EDT
    • I don't know if this would help with the club layout ...

      "“The Complete Field Guide to Modern Derailment Investigation” by Gary P. Wolf (Wolf Railway Consulting, 2021, spiral bound softcover, 436 pp., $75.00).

      Derailments occur with some frequency on North American railroads. Whether it’s a wheel derailment in a switching yard or an entire train on a busy mainline, these accidents must be investigated, analyzed, and reported to various agencies. There is likely no one more experienced in derailment investigation than Gary P. Wolf. In addition to his 50-plus years in the railway industry, Wolf holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering. He worked for Southern/Norfolk Southern for 17 years, and 33 years in his consulting firms, focusing on the analysis and prevention of derailments. Wolf has also been a source of expertise for major media outlets reporting on derailments and has trained over 1,000 people in the science of accident investigation and derailments."

      https://www.railwayage.com/mw/book-review/

    • March 21, 2021 7:55 PM EDT
    • It likely won't answer any of these questions but switch remains visible on Google Maps Satellite view,

      https://www.google.com/maps/place/Dundon,+B,+WV+25043/@38.4621659,-81.0718532,82m/data=!3m1!1e3

    • March 21, 2021 7:55 PM EDT
    • From the other end

    • March 21, 2021 3:43 PM EDT
    • Probably that long because of the reverse S curve to the left if it was a normal length lead.

      Well, maybe, but why not put the points in the usual place, close to the frog? Why prolong the distance between them?

       

      My suspicion is that there was something else going on originally, and that got cobbled together when the 'something else' was removed.

       

    • March 21, 2021 2:30 PM EDT
    • Cliff Jennings said:

      Seems to me kinda like a reverse stub switch, where the incoming rails are fixed and the four outgoing rails are being bent. Probably twice as difficult to throw... Wonder why the long parallel rail section? Trying to avoid a curved turnout?

      It's a normal turnout with the points moving. Looks odd because of the long lead. Probably that long because of the reverse S curve to the left if it was a normal length lead.

    • March 21, 2021 1:42 PM EDT
    • Deleted as irrelevant

    • March 21, 2021 12:18 PM EDT
    • Seems to me kinda like a reverse stub switch, where the incoming rails are fixed and the four outgoing rails are being bent. Probably twice as difficult to throw... Wonder why the long parallel rail section? Trying to avoid a curved turnout?

    • March 21, 2021 1:12 AM EDT
    • Now that is one of the most interesting switches/turnouts I've ever seen,

      "Dundon, WV Station and junction with the Buffalo Creek and Gauley Railroad. 5/29/1960"

       

      [img]https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51037378041_247957e35f_h.jpg[/img]

    • March 1, 2021 8:25 PM EST
    • Hey Y'all;
      Just came across this Flickr post via someone sharing it on Tumblr; a little 4 wheel Soo Line caboose with the modelable features of a "too big for its body" cupola and sliding cupola windows via boxcar door hardware.
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/50993661758/

    • March 1, 2021 1:12 AM EST
    • HI Al,

      Thanks for the info. The more I stare at the web picture I have your right, They are tool boxes just made of metal with a round top. The angle on the picture made it look like two different things. I'm almost done and when I'm finished I try and post some pics. Bachmann was allot closer in the On30 model than the F scale one. I know it was originally a 30 in gauge so maybe they chose to make the tender wider and no smoke box extension to make it a little different in large scale.

      Bill

    • February 28, 2021 7:04 AM EST
    • Bill,

      Assuming you are working with a Bachmann Connie as a starting point, as this is the exact model that Bachmann copied. it is really spot on from what I remember. are you talking about the two tool boxes on each side of the coal space? those are in the model.

      Al p.

       

    • February 28, 2021 1:06 AM EST
    • I am in looking for pics of the top of the tender on FCM#12. It has two weird box like things on the top. Does any one have some pictures or know what they are? My guess is a tool box for one and the other I cant figure out. I am making a model of the Alder Gulch Loco.

      Thanks Bill

    • February 23, 2021 11:33 PM EST
    • Driver screwed up, he should have been able to hear the bells , and backed up or just got across the intersection before the train came through, I would have. Thought the driver would have seen it an made a path somewhere, straight or left hand turn, get off the tracks and figure it out afterwards. Talking from 44 years experience I have had to change my direction at corners before , or not turn, go straight and figure it out after because Imid something blocking the way or tracks to steep to get over safely.  Stopped on side of freeway once because the sign said I was too tall to fit under bridge, a cop came and showed me around the overpass.

    • February 23, 2021 8:39 PM EST
    • From my perspective, the gates were already in the process of dropping before the driver began to more. The warning lights were already flashing at the very beginning of the video, before the driver started to move. Yes, he could have made it if the car on the other side was not there, but that is not how this played out. IMHO, driver error plain and simple.

    • February 23, 2021 5:40 PM EST
    • Ken Brunt said:

      He was in the middle of a right hand turn at the time. The truck had to swing wide to the left in order to make the right turn. Unfortunately he got held up by the car on the street he was turning into that was in his way, and they had to back up so he could get by. That's happened to me many times. 

      What has happened to you many times? Held up by a car making a wide right turn? or had your trailer blown apart by a train?

    • February 23, 2021 5:35 PM EST
    • He was in the middle of a right hand turn at the time. The truck had to swing wide to the left in order to make the right turn. Unfortunately he got held up by the car on the street he was turning into that was in his way, and they had to back up so he could get by. That's happened to me many times. 

    • February 23, 2021 4:59 PM EST
    • I have never driven a semi; we have one guy model RR club who did and one who does, will have to ask them if that driver had enough time to abort that move and stop the truck before getting across tracks. It sure looks to me like they had enough time to abort.