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    • May 22, 2017 10:02 PM EDT
    • Steve, I don't know, but most weed killers kill weeds. Many are formulated to not harm grass.

    • May 22, 2017 4:02 PM EDT
    • Don't mow the grass after application???? Thank yew Lawd, now I can sell my mower and enjoy summer without.......oh, that's not whatcha ment??? Dang!!!

       

      Jack

       

      Actually, I find Preen to be a really good product. Three applications of Preen - March, June, September - and my flowerbeds and railroad beds stay pretty much weed free. Otherwise, I'm walking around with my stupid weed sprayer feeling like I'm singlehandedly killing the environment every few weeks.

      Other good part: I can't tell this week's weed from next week's flower. Preen makes the decision for me.

      Now the bad news: I go thru an entire pail of Preen to maintain my RR and flower beds, etc.  Three pails at close to thirty bucks per pail, plus tax. The things I do to keep the neighbors happy. (I can't complain. They don't squawk about what a crappy lawn I have.)

       

    • May 22, 2017 3:45 PM EDT
    • So, are you saying that Preen won't take care of pre-emergent grasses, David?

       

      Thanks for the tip, Paul.  It will probably take two applications to remove the grasses.  I'll take before and after shots.  BTW, they say don't mow the grass before application.

    • May 21, 2017 2:13 PM EDT
    • Paul, Steve is talking about killing grass, not weeds. Many of the pre emergents are for weed seeds.

    • May 21, 2017 11:35 AM EDT
    • Steve,

      After treatment follow up with some Preen or Casoran for pre-emergence.  Carefull of dosage.  My layout is about to get some generic roundup from Home Depot.  Way cheaper.  I think it is HDX???

    • May 20, 2017 8:41 PM EDT
    • So, why am I bringing up this four year old thread?  To pass on some new to me info.

       

      I was at a club meeting, today, and learned something interesting.  I asked our hostess how she kept the grass out of her ornamentals and groundcover.  Her response...a new to me product from Ortho called Grass-B-Gon.  Just spray the grasses directly, and problem solved.  Avoid drowning your ornamentals and groundcovers.

       

      The usual safety stuff applies, dust mask, eye protection, chemical proof gloves, long pants and shoes.  Shower when done.

    • May 20, 2017 9:42 PM EDT
    • I had a couple of stepables in the past. A lemon, and mint thyme, along with a fern like one. They did pretty good, but the lemon didn't like full sun. I'm not sure how well they stood up to walking as they were just small patches along the garden railway.

      My mom and dad have blue star creeper and that grows pretty good by neglect.

      I thought someone on LCS posted about a similar idea a few months ago?

    • May 20, 2017 9:39 PM EDT
    • Dymondia looks good, stays low, is drought tolerant, and you can walk on it.

       

      You also see chamomile where the C-16 unloads at the hot springs as well as many types of thyme throughout the railroad.  You see dymondia around our volcanos.

       

      https://www.google.com/search?q=dymondia&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjsjbX17P_TAhWEz4MKHZrQAy4QiR4IkgE&biw=1680&bih=920

       

       

       

    • May 20, 2017 8:48 PM EDT
    • I was going to suggest a thyme of some sort.  Look for plants called "Stepables."

    • May 20, 2017 8:27 PM EDT
    • I thought I would see if anyone on this forum has had success replacing traditional grass seed with a low growing ground cover that holds up well to foot traffic. Our yard (approx. 2000 sq ft) is in need of some good tlc after spending 4 years of neglect from our renters when we lived out of state. So I've finally convinced the wife that we need to spend some money getting the yard looking decent with some curb appeal. Just a few days ago I was thinking about ripping out the existing weed/lawn and reseeding. But a green looking lawn requires watering and maintenance.... Besides the fact the my wife has allergies to long and fresh cut grass.

      So I asked her today if she would consider planting a hardy ground cover that is a grass substitute as she thinks that we have to have "grass". She seems to think that of we end up selling in a few years that if we don't have "grass" potential buyers will be put off.

      Long story short, but does anyone have any suggestions for a grass substitute? Can handle moderate foot traffic, looks "green", and preferably drought tolerate. My first thought that comes to mind is either blue star creeper, or a hardy thyme/mint.

    • May 11, 2017 10:14 PM EDT
    • I don't see why it would have any issues, it is very low geared and should have no problem with a 2-3% grade.
      The slow speed it operates at is really nice and realistic.

    • May 11, 2017 10:07 PM EDT
    • I'd like to see if that Accucraft cable car could go up a slight grade.  Even more than your average 2% grade.

    • May 11, 2017 9:24 PM EDT
    • Vincent D'Agostino said:
      Michael Kirrene said:

      The fish aren't to scale but I sure like that cable car!  Does it run pretty well with no problems?  I'd like to get one of those.


      We call the fish *Whales* so they sort of fit to scale! The cable car & the street car pictured both run great, picked them up at this years ECLSTS.

      I see them as Painted Japanese Whales ...

    • May 11, 2017 4:59 PM EDT
    • Michael Kirrene said:

      The fish aren't to scale but I sure like that cable car!  Does it run pretty well with no problems?  I'd like to get one of those.


      We call the fish *Whales* so they sort of fit to scale! The cable car & the street car pictured both run great, picked them up at this years ECLSTS.

    • May 11, 2017 4:47 PM EDT
    • The fish aren't to scale but I sure like that cable car!  Does it run pretty well with no problems?  I'd like to get one of those.

    • May 11, 2017 3:35 PM EDT
    • Managed to get a mid spring run in with plenty of color this past weekend!

       

    • April 27, 2017 7:01 AM EDT
    • Phlox is another great one I forgot about that I use all over. (Thanks for the reminder Rooster).   Phlox  Stays green year round and have the best flower's in the spring.  Stays fairly low.  Most of the sedums of Phlox can be found at Lowes and Home depot.  I love the look of thyme but be careful because it will die in spots and it does not always come back after winter in the Northeast.   

    • April 27, 2017 6:58 AM EDT
    • Dan Padova said:
      Shawn Viggiano said:
      Steve Mitchell said:
      Hi Rooster, I was talking plants for ground cover as a replacement for mulch. Just in case, you might want to wave the Stars and Stripes so they know your friendly.

       

       

      I would stay away from mulch and go with a mixture of rocks and sedums. You really cant go wrong with any type of Sedums .  They don't require much watering, they spread nice, stay low except when certain types flower, the flowers look great,  when you mix them together they look good, they are easy to pull up when they spread to areas you don't want them, they have nice color in spring and fall.  

      I also like creeping Thyme but they tend to die back during the summer and they don't always come back.  

       

       

      Shawn, how well do these do in full sun ?

       

      This is one of my favorite some sort of Stonecrop (Im not sure of the names)

       Image result for sedums

      Coral Carpet

      Related image

      Image result for sedums

       

       

       

       

      They do very well in full sun.  I have used sedums both in shade and full sun.  They are very hardy.  Big difference is when in shade they don't flower as well.  Full sun they really look great.