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    • April 19, 2021 8:47 PM EDT
    • The FA that will push/pull the track cleaner is done with 14.8V, 5,200mA Li-poly cells.

       

      The guts secured inplace:

       

      Track/battery/primary charge jack wiring:

       

       

      I made an extension for the 5-pin plug using an old plug, its wiring and board header from an old VCR.  This is how I ran the "cell wiring" for the balance feature out through the lower box side:

       

      And the adapter for the "power plug" connected to the charger.

       

      Now if we could just tuck that 5-pin plug in someplace inconspicuous...  This required a bit of trimming on the curved edge of the air cylinder but it is not noticable.

       

      ... With easy access:

       

       

      Voila!

       

    • April 18, 2021 5:15 PM EDT
    • John Lenheiser said:

      I agree with Jon, I have a 3x22 foot switching layout and I have only charged my batteries once in the last 4 months and I did that just to have something to do, they were not even close to needing a charge. Those switching guys on the engine do a lot of time BSing between moves, so I think the batteries will last a long time. 

      trainman

      That's NOT BSing!   Us operators like to call it what it really is: extended planning! 

    • April 18, 2021 5:12 PM EDT
    • Jon Radder said:
      Michael Glavin said:

      I'm surprised to not see more enthusiast reports on battery run times!

      Extracting full rated capacity out of Li-Ion batteries is not recommended by their OEM's! If you can realize 70% capacity at the discharge levels atypical of model trains while not dipping below 3.0V its all good. 

      Michael

      Hi Michael,

      Could be that a lot of us that run battery - R/C are operations based not roundy round?  I charge my locos about once a month if they need it or not!  My demand on the batteries is pretty light so I rarely need to charge a battery in the middle of a session.

       

      I don't think I have EVER charged one in the middle of a session.  I really have NO idea how long they might actually last, but when visiting a layout, I would typically charge overnight "just to be sure".   Did they ever need it?  I have no idea.   But I was so "paranoid" that I eventually made all my batteries removable, so in case they ever did run out during an ops session, I could just pop in another one and keep going.  It never happened, but, boy, was I ever prepared!  At home, I would go for months between charges (but only because somebody told me I need to charge them twice a year (and that's probably more than they ever needed!).  To be fair, I never did keep ANY records of any kind, so this is very unscientific. 

       

    • April 17, 2021 5:34 PM EDT
    • John Lenheiser said:

      . Those switching guys on the engine do a lot of time BSing between moves, so I think the batteries will last a long time. 

      trainman

    • April 17, 2021 3:29 PM EDT
    • I agree with Jon, I have a 3x22 foot switching layout and I have only charged my batteries once in the last 4 months and I did that just to have something to do, they were not even close to needing a charge. Those switching guys on the engine do a lot of time BSing between moves, so I think the batteries will last a long time. 

      trainman

    • April 17, 2021 10:23 AM EDT
    • Michael Glavin said:

      I'm surprised to not see more enthusiast reports on battery run times!

      Extracting full rated capacity out of Li-Ion batteries is not recommended by their OEM's! If you can realize 70% capacity at the discharge levels atypical of model trains while not dipping below 3.0V its all good. 

      Michael

      Hi Michael,

       

      Could be that a lot of us that run battery - R/C are operations based not roundy round?  I charge my locos about once a month if they need it or not!  My demand on the batteries is pretty light so I rarely need to charge a battery in the middle of a session.

       

    • April 16, 2021 9:24 PM EDT
    • Today I connected the 14.8V, 5,200 mA battery up in the AristoCraft FA after making the appropriate plugs to make it work and be able to charge it.  This is for the active track cleaner I previously made.

      It has to be over 15 years ago that I installed the onboard Train Engineer in this engine with 15 C-size Nicads.  Talk about a load!  The Nicads never lasted and went flat so I pulled them out after the first couple years and the engine has only been run (very rarely) from track power since (switchable).

      I cleaned the contacts on the old transmitter and put batteries in it.

      When I connected the Li-poly cells and switched to the on-board system, the fan instantly came on.   I brought up the speed on the throttle (engine laying on its side) and the wheels started to move and responded to the transmitter controls.  I didn't even have to link the transmitter and receiver after no power for all these years!  It just worked right.  Boy was I suprised! 

       

      "1-Gauge, One Community" 

    • April 16, 2021 8:39 AM EDT
    • Fred I tried to order them but they were out of stock. So I gave it a go with the printer and am very happy with the results. One of the things I am learning to love. Parts on demand 

    • April 16, 2021 12:44 AM EDT
    • While the Americans are getting all greasy with swing hangers on the truck frames, the Russians are getting all stylish with swag hangers and picture frames in the cab,

      https://www.railpictures.net/photo/761194/

    • April 15, 2021 6:01 PM EDT
    • These parts should be available from "Charles Ro Supply" at very little cost....

         Thank you, David, for your confirmation.

              Fred Mills

    • April 15, 2021 5:46 PM EDT
    • Sure looks like Swing Hanger on the diagram Fred

      And from the looks of things it supports the plate the spring sets on not the spring itself, which would allow a swing motion in use. But YMMV

       

    • April 15, 2021 4:59 PM EDT
    • You might find, with a minimum of research, that those truck parts are possibly called "Spring Hangers"...

           I hope this helps.

            Fred Mills

    • April 14, 2021 6:06 PM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

       And finally I designed and printed some of those step thingies that are on the side of the truck that I have no idea what they are but I was missing all of mine. So I am making progress.

       

       

      "It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing!"

       

      The part is a swing hanger,

      See:

      https://www.railpictures.net/photo/475168/

      and

      cross section diagram at http://ibls.org/mediawiki/index.php/Diesel_Trucks

       

       

    • April 14, 2021 5:55 PM EDT
    • So a little more progress. I got the windshield wipers designed and printed to replace the broken and missing ones.  Got the front cab filler filled in and sanded flush. I added a box on the back side of the cab below the window. All of the STMA locos have this I was told it was a cab heater and blows through the louvered vent in the door. I got the winterization hatch done by adding a screen and some supports to the screen and then glued it on and filled and sanded. And finally I designed and printed some of those step thingies that are on the side of the truck that I have no idea what they are but I was missing all of mine. So I am making progress.

       


    • April 9, 2021 7:52 PM EDT
    • Craig,

       

      I hadn't even realized I forgot them until you mention it. But after having to fill and file and sand I am kinda glad I did. They would have made that tougher. I can print them up and glue them on. 

       

      And as for taking the supports off before the final cure I am glad you all set me straight. It's much easier taking them off first. I thought they needed the support until cure was complete and a lot less excess resin. 

    • April 8, 2021 9:24 PM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

      So I designed and printed the cab filler piece. I didn't get the design right and it doesn't match up with the roof line. But nothing bondo won't fix. Still needs curing. I know you are supposed to do that before taking the supports off but I had to see what it looked like. 

      Devon,  I have never left the supports on to cure.  In fact, I typically shave the bumps off with a hobby knife to reduce the amount of sanding after curing.

      -Dan

    • April 8, 2021 7:06 PM EDT
    • Craig Townsend said:

      Does that thing have number boards as well? Just curious if you are planning on printing those as well.

      Did it and will he ?

    • April 8, 2021 5:01 PM EDT
    •  It's looking real good Devon . I always liked the look of the chopped nose geeps . Thanks for the pictures . Since the "freight shed" picture uploads here were ended I haven't found a picture sharing site yet . 

    • April 8, 2021 9:38 AM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

      ......... I know you are supposed to do that before taking the supports off but I had to see what it looked like. 

       

       

      Devon, I think either way works, but I have found that removing the supports before curing is much easier.  The supports are not attached as firmly prior to curing and generally need less post processing (cleaning/sanding) at that stage.  Just how I do it 

    • April 7, 2021 6:35 PM EDT
    • Does that thing have number boards as well? Just curious if you are planning on printing those as well.