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    • November 21, 2017 5:25 AM EST
    • Nope, just regular brass.  When I do build another layout, I'm doing a raised bed.  I realize there are switch stands already available that are beefier than mine - I'm not trying to reproduce those.

    • November 21, 2017 12:19 AM EST
    • Now, is it made of special flexible brass which will spring back into the upright position after you trip over it? ;)

       

      Seriously, they look cool. If I weren't so clumsy as to continually trip over my low-profile Bachmann machines, I'd probably be down for a few. 

       

      Later,

       

      K

    • November 20, 2017 8:38 PM EST
    • Excellent work, Burl. I started on a switch stand model a couple years ago; no where near as realistic looking as yours though. 

    • November 20, 2017 7:56 PM EST
    • Nice - I love the old style "pump handle" switch stands. There is one near me on a switch the has had the frog removed. I've been tempted to liberate it, but even if I could get the spikes out I probably couldn't lift it.

    • November 20, 2017 7:53 PM EST
    • Sweet.  Thanks. 

    • November 20, 2017 7:44 PM EST
    • On the way via fancy electronics and zeros and ones...

    • November 20, 2017 7:34 PM EST
    • Sure

    • November 20, 2017 7:08 PM EST
    • You interested in some prototype drawings of switch stands? I've got a few I can forward to you.

    • November 20, 2017 6:59 PM EST
    • Something I have been fiddling with in my spare time.  It is 100% brass.  There’s a spring under the base that keeps it in position.  To rotate it, the whole staff raises up & turns 90 degrees.
       
      And before anyone asks: yes, they will be for sale... eventually.
       
       







    • November 18, 2017 11:36 AM EST
    • Cool project.  Looks like something my RR could use. Be interesting to see when complete.  Later RJD

    • November 7, 2017 5:26 PM EST
    • My prints came in last week:

       

    • November 6, 2017 8:26 PM EST
    • Thanks Jim, glad you like them!

       

      Much obliged Chris. Gates don't work, but at least the chutes do.

       

      David, great idea. They're 3D printed plastic though. But if I'd made a cavity for a magnet on their back side, and lasered a hole for a magnet on the wall, you bet, they'd catch! Good food for thought on the next one, thanks.

       

       

    • November 6, 2017 8:18 PM EST
    • Well, if the counterweights are steel, then maybe you could stick some of them super strong magnets on the inside of the building, to encourage the weights to stay in the down position.

    • November 6, 2017 7:00 PM EST
    • Excellent work Cliffy!

       

      Chris

    • November 6, 2017 6:23 PM EST
    • Looking awesome!

    • November 6, 2017 5:31 PM EST
    • Thanks very much gentlemen, I appreciate it!

       

      A few notes on the assembly.

       

      The joint between yoke and moving chute uses, on each side, #0-80 brass hardware (nut, 2 washers and a screw), with the screw clipped to the nut, the nut JB-welded to the screw, and the JB weld painted black. That way there's a loose joint that won't un-nuttify itself. 

       

      The joint between the moving and fixed chutes uses a 1/16th brass rod, with a tight fit on the inside chute and a loose fit on the outside. The moving chute snaps over and onto that shaft. A bit of JB weld is on the inside chute to hopefully insure the rods don't walk. 

       

      Metal counterweight rods are 1/16th steel music wire (needed to spring them in, without permanently bending them). I drilled the counterweights 5/64 for a sliding fit. And though that worked (they really slide well), I wish I'd left it with a tight fit to "counterweight" the weight of the moving chute. So the moving chutes want to fall down, dragging the counterweights up. It's too late to change things (e.g., lead shot in the counterweights), so I'll need to coat the rods with something to get some stiction back.

       

      All the metal bits were coated with JAX pewter darkener after assembly. 

       

      The thread is heavy nylon upholsterer's thread, triple-hitched and CA'd at the ends.

       

      I guess roofing is next, in between work travel weeks. Thanks for viewing,

      ===>Cliffy

    • November 6, 2017 5:10 PM EST
    • Impressive!................

    • November 6, 2017 4:48 PM EST
    • Amazing....    

    • November 6, 2017 4:40 PM EST
    • I got back to the ore chutes this weekend, and here they are.

       

       

       

       

      ===>Cliffy

       

    • November 5, 2017 6:42 PM EST
    • Thanks Howard,

      I think I'll wait until printers can print smooth curves and true balls. I want to print 'waxes' for lost wax casting and the stepped look won't do on drivers and wheels.

      Thank you for taking the time to reply and I'm glad you said hello.