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    • January 22, 2020 11:52 AM EST
    • I agree with John, if you paint over, the "bump" of the original decals will show through the paint.

    • January 22, 2020 11:07 AM EST
    • Physical removal ... sand with a fine wet or dry sand paper on a sanding block so you can get a flat surface. Go slow with finer grits say 1200

    • January 22, 2020 10:45 AM EST
    • David Maynard said:

      An overnight soak in water with a bit of dish-soap might work, depending on how well you sealed them. If you sealed them well, then you may have to lightly sand through the sealer to expose the decal, or remove the sealer with some solution.

       

      Not sure how I would soak the engine overnight.  I've tried nail polish remover and also denatured alcohol. Nothing is removing the decals.  I did spray a clear coat over the decals after I applied them as I mentioned.  Perhaps I can spray paint over them?

    • January 13, 2020 4:43 PM EST
    • An overnight soak in water with a bit of dish-soap might work, depending on how well you sealed them. If you sealed them well, then you may have to lightly sand through the sealer to expose the decal, or remove the sealer with some solution.

    • January 13, 2020 4:32 PM EST
    • I did apply a clear coat over them to seal them.  

    • January 13, 2020 4:18 PM EST
    • timmyd DeHan said:

      I applied water slide decals to my loco a number of years ago and I would like to remove them and apply different decals.  What's the best way to remove decals?

      That would depend on what you applied over the decals to seal them.  If you didn't do that, then Micro-set or 91% Isopropyl Alcohol should work quite easily.

       

    • January 13, 2020 3:07 PM EST
    • I applied water slide decals to my loco a number of years ago and I would like to remove them and apply different decals.  What's the best way to remove decals?

       

      Thanks

    • January 13, 2020 3:54 PM EST
    • I'd probably change the jack from a mini phone plug to a standard DC type of jack.

       

      Strange choice of jack, almost like the programming port connector for a Phoenix... yes, I know it is a sierra

       

      Greg

    • January 9, 2020 3:29 PM EST
    • So, get a wall wart with the right voltage rating, and replace the plug with the plug you want with the polarity you want.

    • January 9, 2020 2:32 PM EST
    • Doing a search I can't seem to find any wall warts that fit your description with a mini phone plug.  

    • January 9, 2020 1:27 PM EST
    • Would actually depend on how the installer chose to wire it, but yes the Sierra convention is to have the tip hot, unlike the link I provided (in Figure 10) before which was the other way around IIRC.

    • January 9, 2020 8:59 AM EST
    • Todd Brody said:

      My charger, supplied by Sierra, is a simple 6 volt, 100 ma wall wart with a miniature phone plug on it.

      Ok, so a 6 volt, 100 ma wall wart with a miniature phone plug on it is simple enough however, is it also not important to know whether the requirement indicates Tip hot or barrel hot?

    • January 8, 2020 1:54 PM EST
    • Dan Pierce said:

      There is another choice, you can place diodes in series with one motor lead, I use a full wave bridge and place diodes between the + and - terminals.  The more diodes the greater the constant voltage drop.

       

      Yes, one could use diodes to slow the engine allowing it to run at a higher voltage.   

       

      In my case, this higher voltage would make the other two trains run too fast.  As it is, the 44-tonner needs to be able to operate at a lower voltage to run with the other two engines.

       

      I've been wondering if the Phoenix "Big Boost" could be used in the charge circuit for the Sierra (I have one on the shelf), but would sure hate too ruin a Sierra board trying.

    • January 8, 2020 1:48 PM EST
    • My charger, supplied by Sierra, is a simple 6 volt, 100 ma wall wart with a miniature phone plug on it.

    • January 8, 2020 11:58 AM EST
    • Todd Brody said:
      timmyd DeHan said:

      Upon much further investigation I found an On/OFF switch on the bottom of the Heisler and on the other underside is a jack.  Looking through my box of misc stuff I found the rat pack that plugs into the jack.  So, if I am understanding all of this, the general consensus is that the battery is toast and not worth trying to charge.  Is that correct?  Also, with the On/Off switch turned on it indeed "motorboats" and never stops.  I am not running the loco very fast keeping the speed more prototypical for the loco.  

       

      If you have the right wall wart (6 volt) you can try to charge the battery.  You have nothing to loose but some time.  Sometimes you can "shock" the battery back to life by using a momentary/very short term "overvoltage" (e.g., 9 volts) before going back to the correct voltage.

       

      If you like/want to run your trains slow (prototypical?) (below about 9 volts), and/or make frequent stops, forget the supercaps.  You will never get enough charge and continually be fighting the "motorboating."  In that case, your only course of action is to replace the battery and give it a good charge before each run until it fails.

       

      I have a USA 44-tonner that I run point-to-point simultaneously with two trains on other lines (all three use the same reversing unit).  The other two engines use very low voltage/power and the supercaps in the 44-tonner don't get enough charge between points such that much of the way it will motorboat.  The other two engines have Phoenix sound systems that will work down to ~3 volts and use nicads.

       

      Looks like I can't find the rat pack (or as you call it wall wart) to charge the sound.  Can you kindly please tell me exactly what I need to get?  I don't see anything on the Soundtraxx website that indicates what charger is needed.

    • January 8, 2020 6:13 AM EST
    • There is another choice, you can place diodes in series with one motor lead, I use a full wave bridge and place diodes between the + and - terminals.  The more diodes the greater the constant voltage drop.

       

    • January 7, 2020 8:07 PM EST
    • timmyd DeHan said:

      Upon much further investigation I found an On/OFF switch on the bottom of the Heisler and on the other underside is a jack.  Looking through my box of misc stuff I found the rat pack that plugs into the jack.  So, if I am understanding all of this, the general consensus is that the battery is toast and not worth trying to charge.  Is that correct?  Also, with the On/Off switch turned on it indeed "motorboats" and never stops.  I am not running the loco very fast keeping the speed more prototypical for the loco.  

       

      If you have the right wall wart (6 volt) you can try to charge the battery.  You have nothing to loose but some time.  Sometimes you can "shock" the battery back to life by using a momentary/very short term "overvoltage" (e.g., 9 volts) before going back to the correct voltage.

       

      If you like/want to run your trains slow (prototypical?) (below about 9 volts), and/or make frequent stops, forget the supercaps.  You will never get enough charge and continually be fighting the "motorboating."  In that case, your only course of action is to replace the battery and give it a good charge before each run until it fails.

       

      I have a USA 44-tonner that I run point-to-point simultaneously with two trains on other lines (all three use the same reversing unit).  The other two engines use very low voltage/power and the supercaps in the 44-tonner don't get enough charge between points such that much of the way it will motorboat.  The other two engines have Phoenix sound systems that will work down to ~3 volts and use nicads.

    • January 7, 2020 7:43 PM EST
    • Upon much further investigation I found an On/OFF switch on the bottom of the Heisler and on the other underside is a jack.  Looking through my box of misc stuff I found the rat pack that plugs into the jack.  So, if I am understanding all of this, the general consensus is that the battery is toast and not worth trying to charge.  Is that correct?  Also, with the On/Off switch turned on it indeed "motorboats" and never stops.  I am not running the loco very fast keeping the speed more prototypical for the loco.  

    • January 7, 2020 7:39 PM EST
    • Dan Pierce said:

      Does Timmyd understand how to wire supercaps in series?  Not everyone understands series wiring and polarity sensitivity.

       

      Nope!  I don't.

    • January 5, 2020 4:32 PM EST
    • I think there are enough helpful people on this thread to take Tim in any direction he decides. We can go step by step.

       

      Greg