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    • March 22, 2017 7:33 AM EDT
    • Nice . . . .

    • March 22, 2017 12:37 AM EDT
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      Okay. I was wondering whether that was a detail or functional.

      Forrest,

      When you get to engines of this size, everything works. The springs actually have to function :)  (along with all the other mechanical items). The axles have 1.125 diameter ball bearings on each end and self-aligning flange ball bearing on the idler shaft under the chassis. All four wheels are change driven.

    • March 22, 2017 12:02 AM EDT
    • Okay. I was wondering whether that was a detail or functional.

    • March 21, 2017 10:25 PM EDT
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      What kind of suspensions do these big things have?

       

      About  a 3/4 inch diameter coil spring, with .090 wire, over each journal box.

       

       

    • March 21, 2017 3:14 PM EDT
    • What kind of suspensions do these big things have?

    • March 20, 2017 4:21 PM EDT
    • Wow that is cool.  Would love to do that around my property.  

    • March 19, 2017 9:49 PM EDT
    • Very cool. 

       

      Certainly cooler than my Athern with dual rubber band drive.

    • March 19, 2017 9:07 PM EDT
    • As you know, I have another thread going about the "little short line" I'm building to go around our home (for the grandkids, of course :)). Well the new railroad needed some added power to do some "switching chores". This Super Husky (available from Eaton Custom Engineering in Castle Rock, WA.) fits the bill. Only weighs 150 pounds ready to run and is made of 6061 T6 aluminum plate. Has two small automotive batteries (Group 26) and is powered by a single 500 watt, 24 volt motor through chain drive to all four wheels. This engine can be lifted by two people and put in the back of a SUV with room to spare. Completely wireless controlled with Phoenix Sound exactly the same way we run our garden railroads. Pretty nice package and a strong puller. There is a video on the website that shows this single engine pulling 11, 1-1/2 scale gondolas. Very impressive for a loco this small. 

      Today I picked up the aluminum material from a friend who got it for me, to begin the chassis build. I returned the pieces I needed to be sawed to my friend this afternoon at the Los Angeles Live Steamers facility. Once they are rough sawed, I can start to mill the pockets for the journals and fasten the pieces together with bolts and nuts and 1 X 1 X .125 thick aluminum angle stock.

      To get a comparison of size of this engine, that's a 36 inch square head blade laying on top of the stock. 1/4 inch thick aluminum.

       

      In the back of the car, ready to take to LALS and turn over to my friend to do the saw cutting.

       

      A couple of photos of the finished engine. When completed, it will look exactly like the old MDC model in "G" scale. Remember the Lil' Hustler?

    • March 6, 2017 9:27 AM EST
    • Way to go Grandpa!

    • March 4, 2017 8:54 PM EST
    • I love it!

    • March 4, 2017 7:44 PM EST
    • Nice Gary,

      So that is what sunshine looks like

    • March 4, 2017 5:25 PM EST
    • It looks like the rain in So. California has stopped for a few days and the weather is great in the high 70's and low 80's. Decided to start laying some track in the rough locations around the house. 

      60 feet of straight panels and 50 feet of 25 ft. radius curves stack on my locomotive rack.

       

      29 feet of straight panels and 40 more feet of 25 ft. radius panels stacked on the ground. I have another 20 feet of straight panels to complete.

       

      First panels "roughly" placed. The ends have to be cut on the curves. I will do that with a "portable" band saw.

       

      The ROW will kind of "wind its way" along the walkways and some of the landscaping.

       

      The 25 ft. radius will continue along past the car in the drive and down the drive to a gate going into the backyard. There is only about 55 feet of the total 175 feet of ROW placed so far. Should be a great "ride" for the grandkids AND Grandpa :).

    • February 23, 2017 3:31 PM EST
    • Ken Brunt said:

      Sure beats all the wild fires they were having a few years ago when we were there. 

       

      Hey Ken,

      The hills above our house here in Burbank are beautiful and green right now, but..........in a matter of a few weeks we will start to see the typical warm weather of spring and the dry Santa Ana winds. The green hills will be brown with thick sage brush and the fuel for our famous hillside wildfires. That's just the way life is here in "paradise" :),

       

    • February 23, 2017 5:10 AM EST
    • Sure beats all the wild fires they were having a few years ago when we were there. 

    • February 22, 2017 9:31 PM EST
    • Gary Armitstead said:
      Rick Marty said:

      Thanks Gary, that explains it for me.

      Are ya stayin dry?

      Rick

       

      No and I'm sick and tired of this rain! I don't know how you do it in Oregon.....I would last about two minutes in that weather up there :). I would never get ANYTHING done!

       

      Yea!

       

    • February 22, 2017 8:22 PM EST
    • Rick Marty said:

      Thanks Gary, that explains it for me.

      Are ya stayin dry?

      Rick

       

      No and I'm sick and tired of this rain! I don't know how you do it in Oregon.....I would last about two minutes in that weather up there :). I would never get ANYTHING done!

    • February 22, 2017 6:49 PM EST
    • Thanks Gary, that explains it for me.

      I think that the top and bottom plate that sandwiches the rail as it feeds through the rolls 

      is what eliminates the possible twist.

       

       Unlike the single rail benders I have used in "large scale" that have no in or out feed support, nothing but the rolls themselves.

      Are ya stayin dry?

      Rick

    • February 22, 2017 4:02 PM EST
    • Tommy Mejia said:

      Those bent rails look great now.  Nice job.

       

      Tommy

      Rio Gracie

      Thanks Tommy. It took me a little while to figure out the setting on the bender to get what I wanted. Once that was done, it didn't take much to "fix" them.

      Rick,

       

      I know you were asking about the chances of producing a twist in this rail using ONLY one rail at a time. These photos should help explain how the construction of this bender avoids that problem.

      This is a photo showing the "geometry of this bender. The first roll die pivots on a screw on the right side of the bender. It is located (partially hidden under the drive die roller handle). The second wheel or roller is the drive die and is directly connected to the handle. The third roller is on the left.It pivots on a arm from the first roller and adjusts for the radius you want to produce. The brass pointer gives you an idea of where the third roller position sits relative to the other two rollers. The whole bender sits in a large vise.

       

      This is the INPUT side of the bender. The opening is only about .020 bigger than the height of the rail. It can't twist! I use this 12 inch long straight sample rail as my "neutral" setting to start the bend. Everything is snugged up tight and the handle drives the rail through. No bend occurs. Then you keep changing the brass pointer location about 1/32 toward you and try the bend. If this is OK, then you just keep running rail through. If you want more bend, just keep moving the pointer another .020-.030 and you get more bend. Pretty simple device. Like our smaller cousins in Large Scale, just a lot bigger and made to fit the standard Code 1000 "West Coast" rail.

       

      The OUTPUT end. Note the rail in place in the background.