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    • July 20, 2017 9:25 AM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Ric, this may be sacrilege, but have you considered N scale to get more in the same space. It's extremely reliable now, and you can get sound units that are actually not bad at all.

      Basically you could model about twice the distance and 4 times the area.

       

      Greg

       

      Greg, a big part of this layout is to display my collections of the last 8 MRS Engines that I have in HO, plus a large amount of rolling stock I have accumulated over the last 40 years.  So the reason for HO.  Remember, I've been in "Large scale" since 1996 and except for occasional flashback, pretty devoted.  The new digs have allowed this to be brought out when it is toooo hot. 

      Lou - How hot is it?  74 was the low last night.  Suppose to be 98 degrees with matching humidity, today.  This is Fair Week in Clinton County, Illinois. Historically, so miserable the farmers only want to be outside at night.  This is the first time we've been her at this time of year in 15 years.  So the reason we attend the Invasion and stay up at the Finger Lakes Live Steamers.  Hope to be traveling again in a couple of weeks. 

    • July 18, 2017 12:46 PM EDT
    • Jeeze, I hit post and the post disappeared... dunno what happened...  I re-entered the post...

      Now I see it showed up over here... on a different thread...

      Killing it...

       

      Thanks John...

       

      Greg

    • July 18, 2017 11:54 AM EDT
    • Cleaned up to protect the innocent (edit).

      I kid as is my nature...

    • July 18, 2017 11:30 AM EDT
    • bad post... deleted

    • July 18, 2017 11:06 AM EDT
    • Ric, this may be sacrilege, but have you considered N scale to get more in the same space. It's extremely reliable now, and you can get sound units that are actually not bad at all.

      Basically you could model about twice the distance and 4 times the area.

       

      Greg

       

    • July 17, 2017 6:40 PM EDT
    • OK, I'll play second banana:

      "How hot is it?"

    • July 17, 2017 6:09 PM EDT
    • Its hot here!  I've got terrible withdrawal from missing the Invasion and the Operations at the Finger Lakes Live Steamers.  Roger C. has a Operation Scenario around Passenger Operations.  Great fun and I think they may have even had Ops on 1 Inch scale, today.  That's 4 3/4 inches between the rails.

      Hopefully, it will get reported on.

      As I hide from the heat in the middle of the day and through the evening, I've been working on the HO MRS switching layout.  I got the road bed for the mainline laid today.   Its a start.

    • July 11, 2017 7:38 AM EDT
    • Hey Dave, great idea!  This whole project is lots of planning and research with years of gathering info.  The actual modeling will be the extreme lower corner of what's on the maps and I'm actually only trying to model about 2 city blocks of the MRS tracks.  This is the Cherokee Street Yard and the American Car and Foundry on the other side of the Missouri Pacific mainline.  The switching puzzles will be lots of staging on both ends and some industries and yard tracks for sorting.

    • July 10, 2017 5:40 PM EDT
    • Well hell Ric just staple the long map to the table and start laying the track 

    • July 14, 2017 9:20 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Good memory Gary.

      Indeed, I worked at the San Diego Division of HP. This division was still making analog strip chart recorders, instrumentation tape recorders and analog XY plotters.

      The division used to be called the Moseley division, and it was basically purchased from Frank L. Moseley.

      I don't remember if he made it to our yearly division meetings, Hewlett and Packard themselves used to visit each division every year for these meetings.

      He was quite a guy.

       

      Greg

       

      Greg,

      Small world.........I don't know about Frank.........I always called him Francis :). After I ordered the generator, he invited up to his home in Flintridge to pick it up. Gave me the tour of his shop. That shop was "to die for". I got to see the fixtures he used to build the generators......in fact at that time, he was working on building a 1" scale working steam generator. To this day, Francis Moseley is the ONLY one to have built and to market a successful miniature steam generator. The secret was in the making of the turbine blades and the bearings to withstand 50,000 plus RPM! BTW, he had a pretty nice 1" scale railroad going around his home and property.

       

    • July 14, 2017 8:41 PM EDT
    • Good memory Gary.

      Indeed, I worked at the San Diego Division of HP. This division was still making analog strip chart recorders, instrumentation tape recorders and analog XY plotters.

      The division used to be called the Moseley division, and it was basically purchased from Frank L. Moseley.

      I don't remember if he made it to our yearly division meetings, Hewlett and Packard themselves used to visit each division every year for these meetings.

      He was quite a guy.

       

      Greg

    • July 14, 2017 10:14 AM EDT
    • Sean McGillicuddy said:

      Gary

      If you were to fill the tender with water ..the rivets are enough or do you solder also?

       

      Sean,

      No the rivets are not enough to seal the tank. I sold this locomotive last January to a young corporate/private jet pilot. He has this engine now running on air. He keeps me "updated" on his progress. But to answer your question.......the top of that tank does lift off to do maintenance and work on the three water valves on the wings of the tank. He will be "fiberglassing" all sides and the bottom. It will essentially become a molded one-piece tank. Holds about 8 gallons of water. There will also be several "baffles installed inside to cut down on the movement of water in the tank. Every live steam engine in this scale (or larger) has baffles to cut down on the "sloshing" of water.

       

    • July 14, 2017 6:05 AM EDT
    • Gary

      If you were to fill the tender with water ..the rivets are enough or do you solder also?

    • July 13, 2017 10:43 PM EDT
    • This thread is just about caught up to "today's build".......

      For the past couple of months, my son and I have been experimenting on various ways to rivet these cabs together. Many years ago, I hand riveted the tender for my 1-1/2 inch live steam ten wheeler. That tender had about 1100 3/32 diameter copper rivets. This was back in the middle 1980's. I was a lot younger and had a little more energy that I have today. Tender took about a week or two to complete and that was the first rivet job I had done.

      We asked around the hobby and got as many opinions as there are people in the hobby! Hand rivet........rivet with a pneumatic riveter.....use steel rivets, less damage to the rivet head........copper rivets, easier to mash the backside stem.....

      We purchased this rivet gun and punches and the rivet "buck" (tool at the lower left hand corner of this photo with the dimple for the rivet head)  from a vendor who does rivet tenders for the hobby as his business. He recommended using steel rivets and using the "buck" on the head of the rivet rather than the "usual" way of using the buck on the tail of the rivet. We tried this on some sample steel rivets he sent. To mash the tail of these rivets, we had to set the pressure on the gun at a fairly high point. We DID mark the heads of the rivets and the mashing of the tail wasn't consistent. We went to Hanson Rivet Company (well-known name in aircraft riveting)  here in Pacoima, CA and talked to the guys in tech support on how best to do this job. Their recommendation was to use copper rivets only and get the proper lengths of rivets. 1/16th inch longer than the total of the pieces being riveted together. This was the best tip we got out of this discussion. Made all the difference in the world! Next they recommended we use a simple hand riveter to do the job. Easier to set the rivet and greater control over the mashing of the tail of the rivet.

      This is the rivet set we used......my old one from back in the eighties!

      Pretty simple actually. The buck side for the head of the rivet is on the bottom. The top arm does the mashing of the tail of the rivet. 

       

      This is the tender I did the rivets on using this device.

       

      Riveting the hoods.

       

      Before we could rivet the hoods together, we had to do the single thickness rivets on the radius of the hood first..........we would not be able to rivet these in place once it was assembled. You always have to think ahead so you don't "paint yourself into a corner".

      We primered the areas that had rivets in place to prevent rust forming between joints.

       

      Completed hood. Ready for sanding and prep for finish paint.

       

      Finish riveted cab end.

       

      Finish riveted cab side.

       

      Cab sides and ends assembled to verify all the rivet holes line up. The entire cab was assembled and held with clecos to make sure the rivet holes all lined up. Take note that the holes on the sides and ends are not symmetrical. Left and right hand corner pieces. Had to be careful in these corner areas.

       

      Riveting the roof of this engine had its own "issues". The arm on the riveting device wasn't long enough to reach the center rivets of the roof! We HAD to come from the side. Because the roof has the typical "Baldwin Locomotive" curve, we had to tip the roof at various angles to get a nice flat "mash" on each rivet.

       

      So back to the "drawing board".

      I machined a new arm for the riveter for the roof only.

       

      The new arm is in front of the vice in this photo. We just remove the original arm and replace it with this new one. Note the clearance cut into this arm to clear the roof as it is tipped.

       

      When these metal roof were rolled back in the middle nineties, they were done by CNC control rollers. But these machines were very crude in those days and left marks in the metal as it was rolled. I did a little "bench work" on these anf smoothed things out quite a bit.

      The so-called "marks" along the edge of this finished sanded roof is actually the reflection of our house in the background!

       

      Finish riveted roof and in the process of final sanding for primer and finish coat.

       

    • July 13, 2017 2:51 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      $900 worth of headlights per loco, wow.... but they are indeed "jewelry"... 

       

      Greg

       

      Greg,

      The large scale "ride-on" hobby can be pricey in SOME items......but the majority of stuff is comparable to Accucraft "quality" and price. The 1-1/2 inch scale caboose marker lamps from Railroad Supply Corp. (shown in a previous post on this thread) are sold at a reasonable price of $75 a pair. Most headlights sold in this scale are usually in the $150 plus range, but are NOT scale models! These lamps ARE scale. Jack Bodenmann (MMM) has been well known in this hobby for many years as the man to go to when you want a locomotive to be well detailed. His models are all handmade. He never uses "off-the-shelf" items. You never ask "How much". Most of the engines he details are valued at the start at around $100K. He takes the locomotive from there. 

      The photo below shows one of my prized 1/8th scale models. A scale model of a Pyle National MO-5 steam generator. This was handmade by Francis Moseley in Flintridge, CA (near Glendale). Greg, you might have known him as he was an inventor and financial backer in early Hewlett-Packard days in the 70's and 80's. When I started my 1-1/2 inch scale live steam ten wheeler in 1980, I heard about these working generators from members of Los Angeles Live Steamers. So in 1981, I contacted Francis, talked to him on the phone and ordered one that day. $200 at that time including hand typed instructions, scale conduit, teflon-coated wire (avoid heat around the boiler) and a working steam regulator (to hold voltage consistent while steam pressure goes up and down). I sold my steam last January (running on air, but not completed) and the generator was never mounted to the engine. Bottom line on this generator now is that IF you can find one (very rare), the price is usually around $2500. Many of the nicer detailed engines at our club have Moseley generators on them and they light the headlamp and cab lights. Pretty nice to hear that high pitched sound running the lights during a night run. Just adds so much to the atmosphere of the hobby.

    • July 13, 2017 2:00 PM EDT
    • $900 worth of headlights per loco, wow.... but they are indeed "jewelry"... 

       

      Greg

    • July 11, 2017 10:38 PM EDT
    • When we saw how nice the new headlights were for my son's new Baldwin, I decided to get my original Mercer Locomotive headlights restored by our Master Model Maker. I removed the 35 year old headlights from my old engine and sent them off to be restored.

      Photos below show the condition of the old headlights after 35 years.

       

      The new "restored" Mercer Locomotive headlights two months later.

      New headlight access door and ring castings, new photo-etched glass custom numbers, new copper reflector casting (chrome plated) and Krypton bulb. They also have the nice curved headlamp glass. The MMM also added the builders plates. Yesterday afternoon, my electrical guy came by the house to replace the old control board for the headlights and installed a new board. The reason for the change is that both the new lamps and the restored old lamps now use a positive ground system. These lamps are designed for steam engines and can use miniature operating steam generators for power. Our electrics are negative ground. These boards separate the two types one from the other, so no grounding problems. I tried these new headlamps last night after dark and they throw my shadow across the street from my garage. That distance is about 150 linear feet. Should be more than adequate for night running at Los Angeles Live Steamers track. The electrician also has a dimmer switch on the hand controller (high beam/low beam). The intensity of BOTH beams are adjustable with "pots" on the inside of the controller.

       

      Comparison of types of bulbs used in both headights. The light on the left is the old Mercer Locomotive headlight that our electrician had replaced the incandescent bulb with an LED. The headlight on the right hand side is the brand new Jack Bodenmann light with a Krypton gas bulb. We felt that the Krypton bulb was much closer to the "warm" look of a prototype Sunbeam Golden Glo. The LED is too "toy-like" and the color is too "cold" looking.

    • July 10, 2017 11:59 PM EDT
    • The original headlights for the Baldwin electric project at Los Angeles Live Steamers in the early 1980's were purchased from Mercer Locomotive in New Jersey. When we wanted to purchase 14 headlights (models of Sunbeam Golden Glo), we naturally went back to Mercer. I was told by the owner that he would have to start a new production run for these because he had not made any for a few years. He was asking $275 each and they were in "kit form". We needed to put down half for a deposit to start production. About $1900 to start and we weren't sure how long we would have to wait for the production to be completed. 

      So we contacted a Master Model Maker that belongs to LALS and started discussion on having 14 headlights made. Jack Bodenmann is the Master Model Maker and we knew he did excellent work. He was also one who was always contracted to add the "fine jewelry" to one-of-a-kind locomotives where "the amount of money wasn't a factor" :). We finally agreed on a price of $420 each, but these were finished models ready to be mounted on the engines. Also the detail and craftsmanship was far superior to anything out there. He also was not asking for any funds "up front". We were never sorry we made this decision. We made our order in early 2015 and received our headlights in July 2015.

       

      The first sample prototype of our order.

       

      Some photos of how these headlights were made.

      Spin casting copper reflector, delryn bulb adapter and a Krypton gas bulb.

       

      Headlight assembled with polished copper reflector. This reflector is chrome plated when finished. There are 12 separate lost wax castings in this headlight.

       

      Number boards. 3 layers of photoetched glass.

       

      Rear of headlight body. Bulbs for lighted number boards.

       

       

      Photos below are the headlamps I received for the new engine. Photos don't do these "justice".

      Note the curved headlamp glass. Nice touch.

       

      Miniature conduit for the wires.

       

      Photo-etched 3D Sunbeam builders plate.

       

       

      Miniature model electrical junction boxes. Bronze lost wax castings and the lids are threaded and work.

       

      Headlamps and junction boxes mounted and wired.

       

    • July 10, 2017 1:48 PM EDT
    • When we first started this project back in 1994, all of the details specific to Baldwin electrics were still available in 1-1/2 inch scale. A vendor in New Jersey, Mercer Locomotive Works, was still making these parts at that time. But by 2013 when we started this "build" again, the vendor was out of business or just not making these parts. I contacted Mercer Locomotive in 2014 and talked to the owner. He said he no longer had the patterns to cast the parts, but if I sent my originals back to him, a could either make new patterns or a mold. Either way this was going to be pricey. Because I had the computer technology, he asked if I could draw the parts from my originals and send the information back to him, he would be able to 3D "print" a new pattern and molds. No cost to us to do this. I just gave him the rights to use my drawing. A few weeks later, we had 20 sets of brand new sand hatch bodies and covers.......... Exactly like the originals!

       

      Mercer Locomotive still sells the shorty coupler pocket in cast iron. First the original on my old electric.......with Mercer Locomotive cast bronze coupler.

      New engine with Mercer cast iron coupler pocket. We use Tom Bee cast steel couplers on this engine. 

       

      Poling pockets and new cast iron pocket for a shorty coupler.

       

      The PE Baldwin engines used Adlake caboose marker lamps. The photo below shows the Adlake lanterns in the PE #1624 at the Orange Empire Trolley Museum in Perris, CA.

       

      For our models, we chose 1/8th scale Adlake caboose marker lamps made by Railroad Supply Corporation in Nashua, New Hampshire. Mounting brackets, fresnel colored kens and lens bracket details all included. Material is cast bronze in a jewelry casting foundry.

       

      Installed on the cab.