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    • December 11, 2014 7:38 PM EST
    • Here ya go Don a picture of Handlebars sign at least.

      Sorry none of the inside

       

       

      For those not familiar with this eating establishment just think of an over crowded and over displayed antique/junk shop with tables and waiters.  Foods good though

       


      Rick

    • December 11, 2014 6:03 PM EST
    • Found in a field to the east of the Durango and Silverton RR on September 10, 2014


      ....a favorite place to eat in Silverton?


      A group of us ate at Handlebars.   I was attracted to eat there by a Burma Shave type sign set just north of the campground on the east side of the D&S RR.


        "Grandpa was Right

       

         You Need a Break

       

         Stop in for some


         Chix Fried Steak

       

         Handlebars"

       


      Sorry, no pics.


      Black print on white background.

    • December 11, 2014 5:53 PM EST
    • I remember them too. Here's all the inspiration anyone will ever need.

    • December 11, 2014 5:14 PM EST
    • Burma Shave signs were a huge part of travel in the 40s, 50s and early 60s in the Western US when I was a kid. I used to watch for them as we travelled. I seem to remember them along Route 66 (now US40) in Arizona, but I could be wrong. They were fun and inventive. I used the idea for an advertising client in the 70s.

    • December 11, 2014 4:51 PM EST
    • My all time favorite,

      "Slow down Pa, sakes alive, Ma missed signs four and Five. Burma Shave.

    • December 11, 2014 11:07 AM EST
    • Roses are red


      Violets are blue


      I cut myself shaving


      Please get help


      Burma Shave

    • December 11, 2014 10:56 AM EST
    • I decided to add a painted Burma-Shave sign to the side of the general store model.  I will post a photo of the model as soon as it is completed.  Here is the sign I picked from the numerous ones available on the internet.  Just search for “burma shave signs.”

      Most folks my age can remember the Burma-Shave signs along the highway.  The signs first appeared in Minnesota in 1925, and remained a major advertising component until 1963 in most of the contiguous United States. The exceptions were New Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada (deemed to have insufficient road traffic), and Massachusetts (eliminated due to that state's high land rentals and roadside foliage).

      Typically, six consecutive small signs would be posted along the edge of highways, spaced for sequential reading by passing motorists. The last sign was almost always the name of the product. There were also Burma-Shave billboard signs, usually in pairs.  Large single signs were often painted on the sides of buildings.  The signs were originally produced in two color combinations: red-and-white and orange-and-black, though the latter was eliminated after a few years. A special white-on-blue set of signs was developed for South Dakota, which restricted the color red on roadside signs to official warning notices.    Some of the signs had railroad themes.

       

       

      Think about adding a Burma-Shave sign or signs to your layout.  It's one more thing we can easily add that makes viewing the layout more fun for our visitors.

       

    • December 11, 2014 3:52 PM EST
    • I've always just made them as I needed them; Drill the holes, chamfer the out side corners. Bead one end of the wire, my oxy/acet makes that a quick job. Slide the wire through and mark the cut depending on the rivet head desired. I can use a ball pein or rivet head hammer or my Fordham jack hammer hand piece. Flush rivets are cut a fraction longer than flush and round heads are a radius + the brain's tad more. It's a reflex.... I gits a feeling, checks the napkin and cuts.

      Finish with the rotary hand piece.... Stamp with it's # ;)

    • December 11, 2014 12:43 PM EST
    • John Caughey said:

      You guys are close ... but until those bags contain Numbered Rivets they are no use.

      Not the number of, either.

      Keep at it the patent awaits ;)



      John,

       


      As long as I can get rivets when I need some I'm OK.   If someone else needs some let me know. 

    • December 11, 2014 11:24 AM EST
    • You guys are close ... but until those bags contain Numbered Rivets they are no use.

      Not the number of, either.

      Keep at it the patent awaits ;)

    • December 11, 2014 11:23 AM EST
    • Vic Smith said:

      Neat tool, I just use a pin vise with a blunted nail in it. Low tech solution but it works.

      I am definitely NOT a rivet counter, but I have used a sewing pattern wheel to simulate a row of rivets in sheet metal flashing.


    • December 11, 2014 5:32 AM EST
    • Graeme Price said:

      I have a confession to make I don't use napkins for my plans.

      I use beer coasters, because all my good ideas happen when I am at the pub.

      I don't count rivets either.

      Am I allowed to stay still?

      Please

      Sure! Your in good company........;)

    • December 11, 2014 4:50 AM EST
    • I have a confession to make I don't use napkins for my plans.

      I use beer coasters, because all my good ideas happen when I am at the pub.

      I don't count rivets either.

      Am I allowed to stay still?

      Please

    • December 10, 2014 9:40 PM EST
    • Hans-Joerg Mueller said:
      John Caughey said:

      Touche`

       

      Bob the dating site is beginning to work!



      John, 


      There's one more connection I have to rivets, dating back to HO days. One of my buddies — in those days a professional model builder — called one day and asked could you/would you build a rivet embosser that can be accurately adjusted for impression depth i.e. used for various sizes and materials. I built two, one I kept.


       


      The throat was kept that large to adapt to many work piece sizes either of us anticipated using. The collar on the weight guide can be adjusted to reduce the impact. The punch and die are inserts that can be exchanged for different sizes. The punch assembly is mounted on a leaf spring with just the right thickness. It isn't high-tech but it works. 
       


      Neat tool, I just use a pin vise with a blunted nail in it. Low tech solution but it works.

    • December 9, 2014 3:37 PM EST
    • I built those embossers long before I had a 'puter and not every drawing coming off the board got saved. Just went through the "Drawings Mechanical" hanging folder, hoping it was there.


      Nope it isn't, but there's a lot of other good stuff that is .... and I had forgotten about.     

    • December 9, 2014 3:19 PM EST
    • John Caughey said:

      Touche`

       

      Bob the dating site is beginning to work!

      Mmmmm not so much.  I just find it interesting that within days of an extensive discussion of copyright...

    • December 9, 2014 1:13 PM EST
    • John Caughey said:

      Touche`

       

      Bob the dating site is beginning to work!



      John, 


      There's one more connection I have to rivets, dating back to HO days. One of my buddies — in those days a professional model builder — called one day and asked could you/would you build a rivet embosser that can be accurately adjusted for impression depth i.e. used for various sizes and materials. I built two, one I kept.


       


      The throat was kept that large to adapt to many work piece sizes either of us anticipated using. The collar on the weight guide can be adjusted to reduce the impact. The punch and die are inserts that can be exchanged for different sizes. The punch assembly is mounted on a leaf spring with just the right thickness. It isn't high-tech but it works. 
       

    • December 9, 2014 12:27 PM EST
    • Touche`

       

      Bob the dating site is beginning to work!

    • December 9, 2014 12:25 PM EST
    • Steve Featherkile said:
      Yeah, I've done that before, many times.  Talked about it here at least four times, the first being in 2006.  You're welcome to use the idea.


      Thank you! Quite possible, but these are high-precision metric rivets.     

    • December 9, 2014 1:07 PM EST
    • Thats very cool Bob! That just might have to go on the build list :D great that you have a family history with it.