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    • March 7, 2019 11:16 AM EST
    • Pete Thornton said:

      I am a little out of my depth here, so I hope one of our electronic experts can offer some advice.

       

      Pete, not sure you can dim them, they make special LED's that can be dimmed but usually dimmers reduce voltage and being as LED's ARE current driven I don't think it will work, on my small LED's light scale house lighting I just use a yellow highlighter pen and it works great but not knowing shape and size of yours it's hard to say. Krylon makes glass paint that is clear but tinted in several colors, next I would ask like some one like Josehf Murchison with the www.instructables.com, Bill

       

       

      These guys are LED drivers designed to maintain constant brightness on some high-power LED spotlights, (which are on the other side of this clump of rock.)  The spotlights are very, very bright. In the store, under store ceiling spots, it wasn't apparent, but at home we keep it not so bright, so they are overpowering.

       

      My usual solution would be to (a) install a dimmer, or (b) run 2 LEDs in series instead of parallel [i.e. use 1/2 as many drivers.]  It appears the Drivers will just accept the 2 LEDs and adjust their output accordingly.  So here's a few questions I am pondering.

       - can I just reduce the AC power feed to get a lower DC output?  As one does on a light dimmer?

       - is there an LED driver that also incorporates a dimmer?

       

      Any advice welcomed.

       

       

    • March 7, 2019 11:07 AM EST
    • John Caughey said:

      Since I'm as qualified as you, I'd try painting the leds with washes until I dimmed them to suit me.

       

      John I just color mine with yellow highlighter and it take the white off, Bill

       

    • March 7, 2019 11:04 AM EST
    • Since I'm as qualified as you, I'd try painting the leds with washes until I dimmed them to suit me.

    • March 7, 2019 9:56 AM EST
    • I am a little out of my depth here, so I hope one of our electronic experts can offer some advice.

       

       

      These guys are LED drivers designed to maintain constant brightness on some high-power LED spotlights, (which are on the other side of this clump of rock.)  The spotlights are very, very bright. In the store, under store ceiling spots, it wasn't apparent, but at home we keep it not so bright, so they are overpowering.

       

      My usual solution would be to (a) install a dimmer, or (b) run 2 LEDs in series instead of parallel [i.e. use 1/2 as many drivers.]  It appears the Drivers will just accept the 2 LEDs and adjust their output accordingly.  So here's a few questions I am pondering.

       - can I just reduce the AC power feed to get a lower DC output?  As one does on a light dimmer?

       - is there an LED driver that also incorporates a dimmer?

       

      Any advice welcomed.

       

    • February 8, 2019 1:03 PM EST
    • Thanks guys for the tips!

    • February 8, 2019 6:29 AM EST
    • I always advise my customers to use just a spot of  silicon adhesive  (the non vinegary smell type if there are PCBs around)...)

      Rubber solution works ok as well.

      Easy to remove when required.

      Cyano or Epoxy is rather permanent! or you damage something trying to remove it.

    • February 7, 2019 9:42 PM EST
    • Shane-

      5 minute epoxy?

    • February 7, 2019 9:34 PM EST
    • Eric,

       

      I've been using epoxy. I tape the wires to hold it in the location I want, and then carefully epoxy around the edge of the LED. I've only used these for my step lights. I've been using 5mm LED's for my headlight and ditch lights.

       

      Shane

       

    • February 7, 2019 8:58 PM EST
    • Curious what others use to mount SMD LEDs? I've tried CA glue, works ok but takes awhile for the LED to take and the glue to dry. Suppose to be 10 second CA but that never works out. I'm using the SMD LEDs for headlights, ditch lights, step/truck lights and so on.

    • February 3, 2019 8:30 AM EST
    • If a cable can be connected backwards then I wire it so if it is plugged in backwards the power and motor pins remain the same.

      SO, for a 4 pin connector I do MTTM  Motor, Track, Track, Motor.  If 8 pins then I add Sound and Light    SLMTTMLS.

    • February 1, 2019 10:08 PM EST
    •  

      Greg makes a valid assertion with regards to Watts = Watts.

       

      A 20V smoke unit will pull less amperage as compared to a 5V unit; 5V @ 0.3A=1.5W, 20V @ 0.088=1.584W and or 0.212A difference or nearly 1/4 Amp. The math tells the tale... Seems all but trivial IMO at these numbers.

       

      A like capacity battery with higher voltage specification will provide more Watts i.e.; 18V x 2200mAh = 39.6 Watt/hours while a 14.4V 2200mAh battery = 31.7 Watt/hours.

       

      From George Schreyer's site:

      Smoke Unit DC Current Test Results

      Smoke UnitTest VoltageColdSmoking CurrentDry CurrentNotes
      voltsResistance
      ohms
      Current
      amp
      ampamp
      LGB 5 volt 5 6.9 0.724 0.3 0.27 moderate smoke
      LGB 24 volt 24 91 0.264 0.10 0.09 heavy smoke
      LGB 24 volt 20 91 0.220 0.088 0.087 moderate smoke
      Seuthe #7 16 44 0.363 0.141 0.129 heavy smoke
      Aristo Rogers 16 27 0.59 0.26 0.25 light smoke
      Aristo Rogers 20 27 0.74 0.30 0.27 moderate smoke
      Aristo FA 20 14.2 1.4 0.34 0.36 moderate smoke
      Aristo RS-3
      (old version)
      20 8.7 2.3 0.45 0.45 moderate smoke
      Aristo RS-3
      (2nd version)
      5 4.8 1.04 0.49 0.49 light smoke
      Bachmann Shay 16 72.5 0.22 0.23 0.23 heavy smoke
      Bachmann
      Big Hauler
      12 88 0.136 0.13 0.13 moderate smoke
      Bachmann
      Big Hauler
      16 88 0.182 0.18 0.17 heavy smoke
      Aristo Long Steel Caboose 20 23 0.87 0.26 0.26 light smoke

       

      Michael

    • February 1, 2019 9:19 PM EST
    • You got it Joseph,  the downside of multiple connectors is crowding the space between loco and tender, more wires to get in the way, and also you can mix up the connectors if you use the same ones.

       

      I like using wires of heavier gauge when routing power between the tender and loco, I prefer the electronics in the tender, and whatever you use, you have to at least run the motor wires between... if you use a smoke unit, another pair of heavy wires...

       

      Everything has a pro and a con...

       

      Greg

    • February 1, 2019 9:16 PM EST
    • Sorry Jon, it's too quiet here... we need some excitement... 

    • February 1, 2019 8:16 PM EST
    • Ok this thread has gone off the rails while I was stuck at work today. Anyway, I am thinking that going with two 4 pin connectors or an 8 pin connector that Eric suggested but will need to see what kind of power it can handle. Can't help but feel like it may be crowded with two connectors but not many better options.

    • February 1, 2019 6:37 PM EST
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      (I use track power so I don't worry ha ha)

       

      Greg

      This is why you used to get "dinged" in the rep system.  No need for that statement at all. For me, it kills the credibility of your post.

    • February 1, 2019 12:03 PM EST
    • Watts is watts... while the voltage regulator wastes some power... a 1 watt heater uses the same "amount" of battery whether you have a 5v unit regulated down or an 18 volt one from the battery.

       

      Basic law of energy, physics...  that is also Watts = volts times amps..... run a higher voltage, you use less amps for the SAME watts..

       

      Bottom line, these units can draw about 2.5 watts (1/2 amp at 5 volts), and that is significant compared to the motor powering the loco itself...

       

      (I use track power so I don't worry ha ha)

       

      I agree with Paul about considering the number of contacts and the force for a "high pin count" connector.  In my example of the K4 above, that is the stock connector.

       

      Greg

    • February 1, 2019 9:49 AM EST
    • Dan Pierce said:

      LGB forneys come with a 5 volt smoke unit.  If you have 18 volt battery, change it to 18 volt smoke unit for longer battery operation.  See seuthe line of smoke units for other voltages/current draw.

      I'm using a voltage regulator on mine. At the moment it's shoved into the front of the boiler, but I have plans to move it so I can get at it...

    • February 1, 2019 7:31 AM EST
    • LGB forneys come with a 5 volt smoke unit.  If you have 18 volt battery, change it to 18 volt smoke unit for longer battery operation.  See seuthe line of smoke units for other voltages/current draw.