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    • June 11, 2018 8:05 AM EDT
    • I understand completely Tac ..

    • June 11, 2018 8:00 AM EDT
    • Thanks, Seán - I think so too.  However, I would have liked the unstreamlined version a tad more, as I think that even in this scale, a busy-looking loco beats any streamliner.  My favourite SP Northenr is any of the war-babies, for that reason, not that 4449 is ugly, you understand...

       

      tac

      OVGRS

    • June 11, 2018 7:25 AM EDT
    • Just beautiful...

       

    • June 8, 2018 4:31 PM EDT
    • running on our little track last weekend.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMIMEFOg9Vk

       

      This was the very first outing with the set of Accucraft's generic smoothsiders - in this case, in CPR maroon.  The odd car out was made by Alan Wright in Ontario, and looks, to my aging eyeballs, to be nearer the correct shade.  However, Rule 8 applies over here in yUK, the same as everywhere else.    For anybody interested, the loco ran for 39 minutes on ethanol and judicious refilling of the tender whilst in motion and the use of an axle pump.  A similar consist hauled with purple meth as fuel resulted in a duration of only 28 minutes.

       

      More this weekend, as it is our anniversary running day - 25 years!! Whoooohoo!

       

      Check it out - fenlandlightrailway.co.uk

       

      tac

      OVGRS

    • June 7, 2018 12:13 AM EDT
    • I have been working on Refrigerator glass for years, not a problem. I'll resist using my flat lap machine this time.

      Good tip.

       

      Thanks.

    • June 6, 2018 6:40 PM EDT
    • Take your time, and get ahold of a nice thick piece of glass to face-up the valve chests and stuff.  You'll be glad you made the effort later.

       

      tac

    • June 6, 2018 4:49 PM EDT
    • Uh oh ...

       

      Funny how help has always arrived a tad late ... C'est la Vie!

      I forged ahead and purchased a Ruby kit, I got the whole kit, but I don't see a caboodle! Oh My!

      I'm waiting for some clear and clean work bench space for the assembly. Could be a while.

      Thanks for the tips.

    • June 4, 2018 9:51 AM EDT
    • In that case, you can do no better than make your first whistle stop at the 'Steam in the Garden' site, and order the 'Starting in Steam' guide to the whole kit and caboodle.  Written in easy style by Scott McDonald and Carl Weaver, it is a really handy little book to get you on the right tracks, hopefully before you've spent any of your hard-earned $$$$$$ on something that might just be unsuitable for a beginner.  I'm going to be carrying mine around in my tote box, in case a trackside visitor asks me something that I can't quite lay my finger on at that moment.  At just $9.95 plus shipping, it's great value, and fully illustrated, too.  My only 'hmmmm' is that although the authors have included Roundhouse Locomotive Works, they have missed out Accucraft UK, whose large range of live-steamers in all the usual scales from 1/32 right up to 7/8th scale form a very large part of the UK live-steam scene.

       

      Needless to say, I have no connection with the StitG organisation except as a satisfied customer.

       

      tac, ig, ken the GFT and Pontrilas Submarine Clog-dancing Boys.  

    • June 3, 2018 10:18 AM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      For those asking;  records show that Mr. Norman Bourgault is rather secretive, and very much a loner. He often starts threads, and asks questions, then retreats into his own little world...this is his privilege, and it should be respected.  His last known location was recorded as being in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

      o.

       

      I was beginning to enjoy this thread.  One of our G1MRA members, Peter Bird, has been building Mexican NG rolling stock in 1/32nd scale to run on 32mm gauge track for a number of years.  Not sure what he has done, if anything, about the loco to haul it around.  There ARE some oddball characters over here in UK who are playing around with WTH scales.  One guy runs 'Heywood's Estate gauge' trains on H0 gauge track - they are 15" gauge replicas of full-size standard gauge locos.  Another runs trains based on the similarly 15" gauge Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway, again in 1/19th scale for ease of 'population'. 

       

      Over here in the UK we'd be flummoxed from the get-go by the near-total lack of ANYTHING in S-scale.  I'm told that there is a small following, but that is mighty small - maybe less than half a dozen [imperial] or five [metric] in the entire UK.

       

      tac, ig, ken the GFT and the Wholesome Full-grain food boys.

       

    • June 1, 2018 11:21 PM EDT
    • For those asking;  records show that Mr. Norman Bourgault is rather secretive, and very much a loner. He often starts threads, and asks questions, then retreats into his own little world...this is his privilege, and it should be respected.  His last known location was recorded as being in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

    • June 1, 2018 5:29 PM EDT
    • IIRR, Eric Schade made a few 7/8ths scale cars to replicate the 2ft Maine NG rolling stock.  It was, as I recall HUGE!!! and used real carpentry methods to construct - real masterpieces, in fact.  He also made a 7/8th Forney to suit, before Jason took up the challenge.

       

      If you look at this Youtube video at 0:36 -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDA46ftlN_0 - and again at 2:38 and 3:26 you will see a Forney - probably Eric's conversion [?], and one passenger car from the Wiscasset & Quebec roadnames..  Note the size by comparison with the Gauge 1/32nd scale locos on the tracks beside them.  At 5:12 is, I think, a 'Fairymead' and a consist of quarry tubs.

       

      I spoke to the Bowater's guy at the recent show here in Peterborough UK, who seemed to think that up-scaling the LASER cutter to make 7/8th models was no big deal, and of course, it isn't.  Just be aware that the average SR&RL coach/combine in that scale is about three FEET long.  Plus, you'll need the matching trucks......mucho dinero!

       

      tac

      Ottawa Valley GRS

    • May 16, 2018 2:13 PM EDT
    • Dear Mr. Bachmann,

      Referring to Mr. Scot Lawrence's 29n2 article,

      Norman, as Bachmann already are heavily invested in On30 on HO track and various "G scales", it seems unlikely they would be interested in yet another combination.  But no harm in asking!

      making their SR&RL stock available in 7/8 ths scale.

      Max, there are plenty of Roudnhouse SR&RL #24 locos over here in the US, and they also made a Forney in 16mm (1:19th) which will match the Bowaters SR&RL cars. 
      Jason at The Train Department is heavily invested in fine scale 7/8ths models, and has commissioned a Forney in 7/8ths, mentioned above.  (There's a photo of the prototype running at DH somewhere, showing just how big it is!)  He sells a SR&RL flat car kit in 7/8ths.
      https://www.thetraindepartment.com/7-8ths-products/rolling-stock-kits-7-8ths-1-13-7/

       

       

       

    • May 16, 2018 3:05 AM EDT
    • Regards rolling stock, this might be of interest - http://www.bowatersmodels.co.uk/sandy-river-and-rangeley-lakes-railroad/ - newish company in UK specializing in laser cut MDF kits, 16 mm scale, can be spec'ed to run 45 or 32 mm track gauges. Now all you need is one of Roundhouse's live steam SR&RL #24 locos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igtNpJmUszk (hope it plays ok)  But then you got to ship it  But then there may be a US based agent  Enjoy your journey.

       

       

      P.S. I could not help but notice that at the bottom of the Bowater's page that mention is made of the possibility of making their SR&RL stock available in 7/8 ths scale. What was said earlier about manufactures producing where the demand is applies here - 7/8 ths is starting to gain traction (geddit !) in the marketplace and the established manufacturers are taking notice and willing to take the risk. Why ? Possibly because there are a lot of model railroaders out there running on 45 mm gauge track looking for something different and as the rest of the market appears a little depressed of late so it's a way of buoying up sales and creating new ones.

    • May 15, 2018 10:54 PM EDT
    •  

      Regarding 1/29 Scale, I posted this on the Bachmann Large Scale Forum as Scot's idea of 1/29 scale makes so much sense given that 0 Gauge track also represents 3 foot gauge. 1/29 is the perfect common scale for the three gauges. ( Ignoring the standard gauge 4' 8 1/2" gauge error at 1/29 Scale )

       

       

      Dear Mr. Bachmann,

      Referring to Mr. Scot Lawrence's 29n2 article,
      https://scotlawrence.github.io/29n2/index.html


      S Gauge track = 7/8 " or 22.43 mm

      0 Gauge track = 1 1/4 " or 32 mm ( 3 foot Gauge ) * 2/3 = 21.33 mm

      The ratio of 0 Gauge : S Gauge = The ratio of three foot gauge : two foot gauge.

      At the scale of 1/28.5 ,

      1 Gauge track at 44.45 mm * 28.5 = 1266.825 mm = 49.875 inch
      4' 8 1/2" = 56.5 inch
      56.5 inch - 49.875 inch = 6.625 inch = that is 6 5/8 inch too narrow track

      0 Gauge track at 32 mm * 28.5 = 912 mm = 35.91 inch , that is 0.09 inch too narrow track

      S Gauge track at 22.43 mm * 28.5 = 639.255 mm = 25.17 inch , that is 1.17 inch too wide track


      Inline image
      http://www.oscalekings.org/images/model_sizes.jpg


      Clearly Scot's idea of 1/29 Scale should be adopted by large scale manufactures as 1 Gauge track currently represents 4' 8 1/2" , 0 Gauge track would represent 3 foot gauge and S Gauge track would represent 2 foot gauge.

      Norman

       

       

       

    • May 15, 2018 7:31 PM EDT
    • Norman,

            I think you will be very happy with your decision.  There are enough options to keep you in this hobby for a long time.

            If you happen to be anywhere near Philly the US branch of the 16mm association is having its annual meet over the Memorial Day weekend.  Send me a pm and I'll put you in touch with the organizer.

      Best regards,

      Tom

    • May 15, 2018 3:35 PM EDT
    • Norman Bourgault said:

       

      Hi everyone,

       

      Thank you for the information. I will choose 1:19 Scale SM32 for my two foot gauge models.

       

      Maybe the 1/24 Scale Delton freelance 3 foot 1/24 scale narrow gauge passenger cars could then " pass " as two foot narrow gauge passenger cars at the larger 1:19 scale.  

       

      Scot has the perfect two foot gauge idea using S scale gauge track at 1/29 Scale. Indoor modelers could use that product.

       

      I did find some old internet articles with links to some two foot gauge product manufacturers. Those are all now non-existent. 

       

      Thanks again,

      Norman

       

       

       

       

       

       

      If you look at some of the UK dealers they make a bunch of 1:19 scale stuff that run on 32mm track also know as 16mm.  Here is a link to the 16mm association  https://www.16mm.org.uk/.  Regner easy line steam engines ca be reguaged to 45 and 32 and Roundhouse you can order 32 or 45mm gauge as well.  There are a lot more options out there by going 16mm.

       

    • May 15, 2018 3:11 PM EDT
    •  

      Hi everyone,

       

      Thank you for the information. I will choose 1:19 Scale SM32 for my two foot gauge models.

       

      Maybe the 1/24 Scale Delton freelance 3 foot 1/24 scale narrow gauge passenger cars could then " pass " as two foot narrow gauge passenger cars at the larger 1:19 scale.  

       

      Scot has the perfect two foot gauge idea using S scale gauge track at 1/29 Scale. Indoor modelers could use that product.

       

      I did find some old internet articles with links to some two foot gauge product manufacturers. Those are all now non-existent. 

       

      Thanks again,

      Norman

       

       

    • May 15, 2018 1:35 PM EDT
    • Norman Bourgault said:

       

      My question,

      What is the Generic Name for :
       Track,   S Gauge at  7/8 " or 22.43 mm to represent two foot gauge.
       
       
       
       

      Norman,

      I adapted S-scale track to model 2-foot gauge prototypes, I call it 29n2 scale:

       

      https://scotlawrence.github.io/29n2/index.html

       

      I created 29n2 scale 14 years ago, and as far as I know, I am still the only person modeling in that scale! ;)

      which is fine..

       

      yes, S-scale track is technically too wide for 24" track in 1/29 scale.

      S-scale track gauge is 22.42mm, and 2-foot gauge in 1/29 scale is 21mm.

      For a total discrepancy of 1.42mm, close enough for me! ;)

      (as has already been said, If using S-scale track for 2-foot gauge, it scales out to 1/27 scale)

      But since 1/27 is not an existing model railroad scale, but 1/29 is, I decieded to "adopt" the S-scale track gauge for use with 29n2 scale..

      IMO, its definitely close enough..

       

      I kitbashed a Bachmann "Indy" Industrial Mogul into a 29n2 scale Maine forney:

       

      S-scale track on the left representing 29n2 scale track, 1/29 scale standard gauge on the right, both models are 1/29 scale:

       

      And I scratchbuilt a boxcar:

       

       

      more details in the link above..

       

      Your question about using S-scale track to model 2-footers in 1/24 scale does not compute. ;) because S-scale track is not a good size match for 1/24 scale. There are no commercially available 2-foot gauge models in 1/24 scale, they dont exist.  And as far as I know, there is no 2-foot modeling in 1/24 scale. someone has probably done it! ;) but if so, it is not known in the hobby at large..

       

      For "large scale" modeling of 2-foot gauge prototypes, you have three options:

       

      7/8n2 scale, 1/13.7 scale, which is 2-foot gauge on 45mm track. There are some commercially made models in this scale. (the Accucraft Fairymead is one)

       

      1/19 scale, which is 2-foot gauge on 32mm track (O-scale track). There are some commercially available models in this scale.

       

      29n2 scale, 2-foot gauge in 1/29 scale, discussed above. using S-scale track. There are no commercially made models in 29n2 scale, only the few models I have made.

       

      then of course there is also  On2, Sn2, HOn2, and probably Nn2.

        

      Scot

       

       

    • May 15, 2018 9:19 AM EDT
    • Norman,

           I have been in the live steam branch of this hobby for over 20 years and have built layouts from Z scale (1:220) to 1:13.7.  Since I often exhibit at train shows I am conversant with the scales and gauges that are most common since I have the opportunity to answer a lot of questions in this regard from show goers.  Shawn and Eric are also very knowledgeable and we would like to help you.

           It is easy to get confused by scale and gauge.  My smallest locomotive, a Cricket, is 7" long and my largest (now sold on) was an East Broad Top Mikado at 36" long yet both are built to the same scale (1:20) to run on the same track. (45mm - gauge 1)  So the size comparison shown in the illustrations from Scot Lawrence (referenced by Pete T) and Gordon Watson (Argyle) are only that, a comparison.

           If you want live steam in any scale you should settle for either 32mm or 45mm gauge unless you can find a custom builder who would scratch build to your specifications.  You could buy a ready to run or kit live steam chassis from Roundhouse engineering in England and build the body work.  I have seen the chassis of electric locomotives converted to live steam which I suppose you could do in S gauge if that was your desire.  There are some obscure suppliers who sell HO gauge live steam but they are toy like and run for a very short time.  I have a friend who built an On30 vertical boiler locomotive which runs well.  If you would scratchbuild your track you could do any gauge you want.

           Then there is the matter of rolling stock.  There is a lot of ready to run and kits available in the major live steam scales.  Again scratch building is an option if nothing readily available suits you. 

           The social aspect of this hobby is a strong draw for me.  If you use one of the common gauges you can get together at steamups with other live steamers.  Also if you tell us where you are located we can probably put you in touch with a local steamer who would help you on your journey.  Send a private message if you don't wish to broadcast your location.

           The bottom line is that we would like you to achieve the level of satisfaction and enjoyment we have found in live steam.  I think you need to settle on a common scale/gauge combination and go forward.

      Best regards,

      Tom