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    • February 6, 2020 9:43 PM EST
    • The Taylor Tim factory uses the duel grooved male and female roller system like your last pic.   The harder the metal,  the more difficult it is to get the "grab" on the rollers.  Softer, "annealed" metal will "stretch" as it passes thru the rollers.  

       

      Harder, metal will be stretched to the cracking or tearing point.  In the real manufacturing world, corrugations are rolled one grove at a time, allowing the metal to form without a great deal of stress or stretching, more of a fold, then a stretch. The metal passes thru a series of forming dies from the start to finish.

       

      Dave

    • February 6, 2020 7:24 PM EST
    • Dave Taylor said:

      Dan...... Not to burst your bubble...... But.... I don't see any means to adjust the depth interface between the two rollers...   Very important to regulate the depth of the crimp, and the clearances between the rollers for any changes in material thickness, and annealed state...

      Details, details ....... thanks for pointing that out, Dave. Believe it or not, I had thought about that early on in the design process but chose to fix the distance based on the 0.002 steel shimstock I am using.  Probably should (will) make that change once I get the rollers printed.  Question, regardless of the method used to adjust the height, there is always the issue of keeping the adjustment roller level because I am assuming, without giving it much thought, that the two ends of one roller will have to adjust independently. So how do you keep them level?  Count turns on an adjustment screw?  Pre set adjustment heights?  Any suggestion?

       

      EDIT: To ask one more question.

       

      Dave, I considered trying a roller orientation as shown below, but I don't think there will be enough friction to pull the stock through and its not stiff enough to push.  Any thoughts?

       

       

    • February 6, 2020 5:26 PM EST
    • Dan...... Not to burst your bubble...... But.... I don't see any means to adjust the depth interface between the two rollers...   Very important to regulate the depth of the crimp, and the clearances between the rollers for any changes in material thickness, and annealed state...

    • February 6, 2020 4:14 PM EST
    • Dan;

       

      Sorry you experienced that mishap.  The freeform mass of plastic filament on your 3D printer does remind me of excelsior. (Remember that stuff?  As a child, I actually had one or two plush toys that were stuffed with excelsior.  They were not very cuddly.)  Anyway, what I am trying to say is that you could perhaps salvage it as packing material.  Expensive, I know, but still better than just throwing it away.

       

      Best of luck for your next try, David Meashey

    • February 6, 2020 3:48 PM EST
    • Dan

      This is quite interesting, curious to see this finished, Please keep us in the loop

      Dennis

    • February 6, 2020 9:09 AM EST
    • 3D printing, it's not just for making parts any more, it also makes tools.

      Ah yes, kitten-proofing the hobby and work areas ... fortunately both my guys are heading toward senior cat ages and have a better sense of discretion than in their kitten years.

    • February 6, 2020 12:32 AM EST
    • John Caughey said:

      Are the tops of your ribs rounded?

      Biggest complaint about the crimper is it makes folds instead of reverse curves.

      Run the mess through the crimper and call it roofing.

      Yes, John, the profile is reverse curves. The good thing about making this is I control the profile. If this all works like I expect it to, I will make several profile rollers like standing seam roofing. 

    • February 6, 2020 12:17 AM EST
    • Are the tops of your ribs rounded?

      Biggest complaint about the crimper is it makes folds instead of reverse curves.

      Run the mess through the crimper and call it roofing.

    • February 5, 2020 11:30 PM EST
    • I've been making corrugated tin with the paper crimper you can get at most craft stores and it does a good job, but its not quite to scale and you get what you get.  So, I decided to attempt to make one that was more to my liking.  Over the last several weeks while waiting on parts for my MIK project to print, I've been refining the design and am finally where I think I am ready to create at least the first prototype.  I expect there will be refinements, but I got to start somewhere.  Here is the model as of now.

       

       

      Last night I started printing the two rollers, an 18 hour print.  I came home from work today to this ( I posted it earlier in my MIK build log):

       

       

      You can see a partial roller in the left rear of the printer.  The other roller is behind all the wasted filament.  For some reason, at some point, the rollers moved.  I think it can be attributed to a curious kitten, but not sure.  Anyway, I have restarted the print but only a single roller at a time.  All toll, its about a 35-40 hour printing project.  

       

      All comments, suggestions, criticisms welcome.

    • January 24, 2020 7:16 PM EST
    • http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=2510

    • January 24, 2020 4:36 PM EST
    • Hi guys,

      My brother-in-law has a pretty good machine shop. While visiting a few weeks ago I noticed this perched on one of his toolboxes:

      Pretty nifty, huh? Apparently these were made in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The whole thing is probably only a foot long and fully functional.


      Cheers,

      Matt

    • January 23, 2020 2:46 PM EST
    • I like using Ambroid Pro Weld Professional plastic welder when gluing plastic together. I have used it on a couple of scratch built freight cars and it does a good job.

    • January 22, 2020 3:43 AM EST
    • The needle bottles can be picked up at Hobby Lobby. I used MEK at work for years. it was a carrier for automotive window primer and we used it to clean up spills or drips. The primer we applied to the glass flange on the car body was brushed on out of a measuring cup that we held in front of us. Can't tell ya how many times I about hit the floor from the fumes gassing off from the open cup.......

    • January 21, 2020 7:43 PM EST
    • Over on MRH, Joe F has come up with a healthy substitute for MEK. I will have to search for it and post here. I haven't tried it yet, but will when the MEK runs out.

       https://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/8083?page=6

      I second the needle bottle.

    • January 21, 2020 7:17 PM EST
    • Our big box stores (Lowes & Home Depot) both carry MEK in quart cans.  If you can't source it in your state I could grab you one and send it UPS to you

    • January 21, 2020 5:14 PM EST
    • Devon Sinsley said:
      Bill Barnwell said:

      The glue that Plastruct sells is pretty good

      Not sure about the other brands listed but the Plastruct stuff is M.E.K. or at least partially so, or it was 10 years ago. The only reason I switched to straight M.E.K. was I realized I was spending as much for a 1oz bottle of Plastruc as I could buy a quart of M.E.K. and get the same thing. I tried it after buying it and it worked just as good as the Plastruc stuff, maybe even better, and I figured I had a quart so it would be a life time supply. Until you loose the can.

       

      The only real issue I have with straight M.E.K. is the container. So either save a plustruc bottle, or some similar, or some other smaller glass bottle with a lid and then get a paint brush and your off and running. That is until you break the lid on the plastuc bottle and spill the rest and then can't find the big container.

      Devon,

      I get my MEK at the local Ace hardware store. I keep it in 1 oz. needle tip plastic bottles (really, they don't melt). We kept MEK in plastic bottles at work too [Northrop/Grumman].

      Here is a link to similar bottles on Amazon...Needle tip bottles

    • January 21, 2020 4:55 PM EST
    • Acetone will work almost as well as MEK. I have used acetone in a pinch. Chemically they are similar compounds. But real MEK is the good stuff.

       

      I never tried substitute MEK. I did try the substitute TSP. What a waste of good money that was.

    • January 21, 2020 12:51 PM EST
    • I use IPS Weld-On 3 Acrylic Plastic Cement as my Plastruct and MEK replacement.  So far it has worked well for me for my indoor projects and I do most of the application with a brush.

    • January 21, 2020 12:07 PM EST
    • If I were really smart I would just drill a hole in a piece of wood that I can stick my plastruc bottle in and keep me from spilling it. For every ounce I use on plastic I spill 60 oz. If I could keep from spilling it all the time I wouldn't need so much and a bottle of plastruc would last a life time. As is I am lucky if the bottle last one project.