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    • March 6, 2018 9:16 PM EST
    • Michael: I understood what you meant.  I'm just not sure how to accomplish it if the axle length isn't predictable, since the distance between the end of the axle and face of the wheel when it's in gauge would be manufacturer specific. 

    • March 6, 2018 9:03 PM EST
    • To clarify - the wheels can still be in gauge but maybe not centered on the axle. 

       

      For the Rooster: Some of us are proactive and want to get it done before a derailment happens and the cars fall and hit the dirt/cement. And.............switches are bitches. 

    • March 6, 2018 8:57 PM EST
    • Michael Kirrene said:

      I'd like to see one gauge block that gauges not only the distance between the insides of the wheel flanges but also gauge the distance between the outside of the wheels and the ends of the axle on both sides. You know, verify that the wheels are centered equidistant on the axle in addition to verifying the distance between the wheels all in one shot? Is that doable, or is 'eyeing' it good enough? I have quite a few Bachmann 92421 31 mm metal wheel sets that I need to check! 

      Interesting idea.  NMRA doesn't have a standard for overall axle length, and I don't know they're all the same (I haven't compared various brands).  Any shape is possible, but I don't know how you'd center it for an arbitrary axle length.

      I'll PM you about sending one.  

    • March 6, 2018 8:52 PM EST
    • Who checks wheel spacing until a derailment?

      I don't

      Nice work Eric

    • March 6, 2018 8:39 PM EST
    • I'd like to see one gauge block that gauges not only the distance between the insides of the wheel flanges but also gauge the distance between the outside of the wheels and the ends of the axle on both sides. You know, verify that the wheels are centered equidistant on the axle in addition to verifying the distance between the wheels all in one shot? Is that doable, or is 'eyeing' it good enough? I have quite a few Bachmann 92421 31 mm metal wheel sets that I need to check! 

       

      Meanwhile, please put me on the list of those who would like to have this tool. Thanks, Eric!

    • March 6, 2018 7:35 PM EST
    • Good point.  The issue I have is that the back-to-back dimension needs to be gauged to fit in the flangeways on my Code 250 switches.  I'm pulling them open, and then pressing them back against this gauge.  

    • March 6, 2018 7:14 PM EST
    • Don't forget the gauge on the outside of the wheel flange.  If the wheels happen to have a thick flange and you set the back to back then the wheels may not fit properly between the rails.  

    • March 6, 2018 6:33 PM EST
    • Jim Rowson said:

      What are the units in the STL file? Millimeters?

       I expect so.  I didn't specify otherwise, and the design was in millimeters.  

    • March 6, 2018 5:59 PM EST
    • I'd be happy to pay for materials time and shipping if you let me know how much.

       

      What are the units in the STL file? Millimeters?

       

    • March 6, 2018 5:39 PM EST
    • I would be happy to make a few and mail them to folks here.

    • March 6, 2018 5:09 PM EST
    • That's very cool. Thanks for including the STL file. Now if I can just figure out a place to get one printed. I'm guessing that's easy from some on-line fabricator nearby...

       

    • March 6, 2018 4:23 PM EST
    • That wouldn't be too difficult.  My thought with this one was to use it vertically in the arbor press and ensure that the gauge is the same all the way around.  But a go/no-go gauge in the same style would be useful for just checking gauge.

    • March 6, 2018 3:33 PM EST
    • pretty cool, have you thought about making one that has the NMRA tolerances on it? max and min?

       

      Perhaps the width is stepped?

       

      Greg

    • March 6, 2018 1:20 PM EST
    • Here is a 3D printed tool for gauging wheels.  It's exactly 40 mm wide.  

       

       

      STL file attached.

    • January 12, 2018 10:34 PM EST
    • Even though this thread is about 5 years old,  here are some Google results for spot drill vs center drill that may provide additional insight.

       

      p.s. Welcome to the forum Karl.

    • January 12, 2018 9:57 PM EST
    • You will think the drill is working fine, and within a few thou of center at the beginning of the hole, only to find it is off by more than the drills diameter on the other side.

      Oh. Gee, and here I thought it was me doing something wrong. It was the drill bit itself flexing. I never would have guessed.

    • January 12, 2018 4:32 PM EST
    • Hi Jim:

       

      My name is Karl, I'm a new member and this is my first post. I have some information related to your post and thought I would use this reply to introduce myself, comment on your post, and test my picture posting skills.

      As an introduction, I'm a long time model railroader in various scales(around 50 years worth), and always a live steam enthusiast with a distinct fondness for G scale live steam. I am also, with my wife Jenn, the owners of a small manufacturing facility and have been a machinist for far to long.

       

      I have to comment on your post about Center Drills. Although they can and are used for centering the start of a drilled hole, they are not designed nor best for that use.

       

      They are designed to be used to create a taper and a lubrication pocket for dead centers on a lathe.The taper on a centerdrill is not correct for chamfering, countersinking, or thread starting. It is intended to match the angle of the taper on the dead center. The small drill tip leaves a pocket to be packed with grease, before bringing the tailstock with the dead center up against the stock to be turned between the chuck and the dead center.

       

      These are also used for live centers, but because of the thrust bearing, no lube is required since the center turns with the material.

       

      The proper way to start a drill is with a Spot Drill. These are beefy, short flute drills usually at 90 degree tip but available in other angles. They are designed to be rigid and not wander. They use a split point for further help staring on center. Normally, you use a spot drill that is larger than you drilled hole, and you drill deep enoungh to leave a chamfer after you drill. You drill larger than the diameter not only for the chamfer, but because the best way to get a drills split point to draw to center is to have the outer edges of the drill pull in first so the drill is near center when the split point hits. On screw machines with deep hole drill features in a part, you can find out quickly how far a drill can bend in a hole if you start with a spot smaller than the diameter of you drill. You will think the drill is working fine, and within a few thou of center at the beginning of the hole, only to find it is off by more than the drills diameter on the other side.

       

      Here is my attempt at a picture of spot drills:

      With two CNC lathes, two screw machines, and many years experience Supervising high volume industrial production machine shops, I have seen and heard it all. One of the

      most common misconceptions is the topic of your helpful hint.

       

      That being said, center drills will work to start regular drills for most needs of the hobbyist. Just thought you might find the clarification useful.

       

      Thanks and happy drilling

       

      Karl

    • November 18, 2017 9:24 PM EST
    • As a young PFC,  I got pulled over outside Ft. Monmouth NJ in a Military Sedan with just me and a Visiting Generals daughter.  They called the General to verify her ID, and then my CO to verify why I was driving a Military sedan in Civies!  And then the MPs showed up.  She stepped in and showed her ID and dropped the Generals name and 3 Stars on them.  Things changed in a hurry.  She wanted to take a moonlight walk on the beach, and every one said to go for it.  We drove to Sandy Hook, and , and, and ...... When we got back to base the guards were waiting for us.  Along with the OD and we had an escort to the Visiting Officers Quarters.   The next morning, my CO, had a stern talk about protocol,  and then sent me out again, with the Generals daughter for the day (she had requested me again ), on escort duty.  She wanted to go to the Board Walk on Cony Island. Daddy had provided us with $50 for the day.  Some days in the army were better then others... 

    • November 18, 2017 7:43 PM EST
    • Doug, try the words instead.

      Maybe Lowes.CA uses different #s, a little bit our common colourful language:-)

      Attended Celtic Colours festival from 2000 to 2008. 

      Drive got too long.

      They now stream some of the concerts.

      Look at the links youtube has for similar concerts.

    • November 18, 2017 7:41 PM EST
    • SKU’s are an internal number, assigned by the merchant.  May not mean anything where you’re looking.