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    • June 22, 2017 6:13 PM EDT
    • Thanks Gary for all the tips here and in your build logs. My wish list is growing of tools to find, including a center drill finder, and a larger x/y table for my bigger drill press. I can see why the tooling ends up costing more than the machines!

    • June 22, 2017 6:05 PM EDT
    • Craig Townsend said:
      Thanks for the tips about drilling. I went out and bought my self a set of center drills.
      Nice step forward. The proper tools always increase our skills and success.

       

    • June 22, 2017 4:14 PM EDT
    • So I was able to salvage one of the brass parts by soldering in a replacement rod, and redrilling the hole, but I ended up tossing the piece because when I went to solder in a hinge, the combination of solder, my lack of soldering skills, and my lack of drilling skills made the whole thing into a giant mess of solder.

      I'm trying to solder and build a small hinge piece for my snow plow, and this is my first attempt at using my resistance soldering set up. Definitely a learning curve for soldering like this. And I think it will also help now that I have a foot petal switch too.

      Thanks for the tips about drilling. I went out and bought my self a set of center drills.

    • June 20, 2017 6:29 PM EDT
    • Thanks for the info. As I suspected, I had way too much of the drill bit out of the collet. And yes these are pretty new drill bits. Off to fire up the resistance soldering unit and solder in a rod.

      I'm still learning how to use brass. It certainly takes a bit more thought than plastic in terms of drilling and cutting. Doing just a little bit of metal working highlights how useful a small milling machine would be.

    • June 20, 2017 4:06 PM EDT
    • Would think a sharp drill would not wander so much.

      Greg

    • June 20, 2017 3:19 AM EDT
    • Good advice....Nay!  EXCELLENT advice.

    • June 20, 2017 1:37 AM EDT
    • Craig Townsend said:
      I need help solving a problem. I'm trying to drill a #52 hole in a piece of brass about 1/4" thick. I clamped the brass piece to the drill press table, and lined up the bit. As I'm drilling the bit wanders from 90 degrees vertical to a 80 to 70 degree angle. I'm using a light oil as cutting fluid, but what else am I doing wrong? My only guess is that I have too much of the drill bit shaft out of the collet, and as I cut it bends. The other question is can I plug the hole with a brass rod, and solder together. If I do that will the new drill hole wander into the previous hole? This beginner machinist needs some help! Craig

      Craig,

      First of all, use a #1 center drill (.0468 dia. X .125 body dia.) to start the hole. Don't depend on a prick punch mark. This is a small drill (.063), so you need to push the drill as far into the collet as feasibly possible. You are only going through 1/4 inch thick stock, so you only need slightly more than that amount showing out of the collect. Better yet, only have about an 1/8 showing to go part way. Drill it dry. No oil. You will be "peck drilling". In other words start the #52 drill into the center drilled hole and cut maybe .020 to .030 deep and pull the drill out . Clear the chips and start the drill again. Go another .020-.030 and back off again. You will get a nice straight hole that way. Every hole I ever drill starts with a center drill. I don't do it any other way.

      As to your other question about plugging the hole: you CAN plug the hole and if you peck drill as I suggested, the drill should NOT follow the old hole. Remember this: Center drill and then choke the drill up as short as possible. Peck drill and do it DRY. You'll be good to go. I have been a machinist/die sinker for over 50 years. You have probably seen some of my machining projects posted on LSC.

    • June 20, 2017 12:49 AM EDT
    • I need help solving a problem. I'm trying to drill a #52 hole in a piece of brass about 1/4" thick. I clamped the brass piece to the drill press table, and lined up the bit. As I'm drilling the bit wanders from 90 degrees vertical to a 80 to 70 degree angle. I'm using a light oil as cutting fluid, but what else am I doing wrong? My only guess is that I have too much of the drill bit shaft out of the collet, and as I cut it bends.

      The other question is can I plug the hole with a brass rod, and solder together. If I do that will the new drill hole wander into the previous hole? This beginner machinist needs some help!

      Craig

    • May 4, 2017 11:38 AM EDT
    • on my first day as ship's boy the 2. officer sent me to the engine, to get the key for the compass.

      they sent me up with a giant wrench that weighted at least 50 pounds...

       

      i think, these pranks are a kind of ritual, to integrate new team members.

    • May 3, 2017 5:03 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Well, if you were fired for wasting an hour because of a prank and you were brand new, then you were well rid of that company and/or supervisor.

      We have fun where I work, we work hard but the job needs to have some benefits, or you will never attract good people.

       

      Greg

      Yes, I insist on having fun. But not making fun of other people, or inflicting frustration upon them for my own amusement.

       

      In fact I told my boss at Imagistics that "If it aint fun, I aint gonna do it." He gave me the strangest look...

       

      I may have been better off without that job. But fresh out of tech school, with student loans to pay, I didn't think so when I was working at the car wash instead of Robicon.

    • May 3, 2017 4:43 PM EDT
    • David Maynard said:

      Greg, I joke with folks who know me and that I know. But I don't pull pranks nor so called practical jokes, because they get way out of hand too fast, and someone gets torqued off or hurt.

       

       

      Like my brother is still mad 50 years later, as if it was our fault he didn't have a change of clothes at his wedding reception! He chose to have it near a pool.

      50 years of younger brother revenge! Way worth it!

    • May 3, 2017 11:56 AM EDT
    • Well, if you were fired for wasting an hour because of a prank and you were brand new, then you were well rid of that company and/or supervisor.

      We have fun where I work, we work hard but the job needs to have some benefits, or you will never attract good people.

       

      Greg

    • May 2, 2017 11:27 PM EDT
    • Yep, Lunette Hole, Trunion Wrench, Recoil Oil, Bore Blaster,....M102 artillery battalion

    • May 2, 2017 5:37 PM EDT
    • Evidently some people have never been in the military............or the Boy Scouts for that matter. 

      Left hand smoke shifters, reverse monkey wrenches..................

    • May 2, 2017 4:07 PM EDT
    • Greg, I joke with folks who know me and that I know. But I don't pull pranks nor so called practical jokes, because they get way out of hand too fast, and someone gets torqued off or hurt.

       

      When I started at Robicon, my second real job, I was sent to get the tape splitter. After wandering around the plant for well over an hour, I ended up in my supervisor's office having to explain why I was not at my workstation. I was fired a week later. So that joke was real flippen funny, ha ha.

    • May 2, 2017 3:33 PM EDT
    • I guess in its day it may have been considered a great joke, but today it might be considered as abuse.

       The jokes are fine, if  there is a limit to them. The problem starts to get out of hand at times, and does become ABUSE.....

        A good supervisor/ manager, knows very well where to draw the line, but often fails, and that's the problem.

      I guess we all play jokes on others, at one time or another, or make crude remarks, and use crude language. Not everyone appreciates these actions, so we should at all times consider others.

          There are people on the other side of the coin, that are considered, "Thin Skinned", and are overly sensitive to all that crap.

            What is the limit......good question.....do we really need to even use or simulate the "F" word....what real value is it as an adjective, in chatting or conversation ?.....as an example.

          Just thoughts......where do YOU draw your line.....it would be good to hear your answer, and reasoning.

         Fred Mills

    • May 2, 2017 12:07 PM EDT
    • Something about casting the first stone.

       

      David, you have NEVER pulled a joke or prank on someone? (sounds VERY boring)

       

      This guy looked back on it and laughed when he saw the joke...

       

      Greg

    • May 2, 2017 9:55 AM EDT
    • David Maynard said:

      Laughing at someone else's frustration is cruel. I just don't get the joke, nor see the point.

      Clearly you have never spent the evening in chat with Rooster. He invites abuse and it would be impolite to refuse it.

    • May 2, 2017 6:13 AM EDT
    • Boomer K. said:

      Mike

      We used to pull a trick about this on new Airmen coming into the shop from tech-school. Most crescent wrenches are marked on the handle for their length. One side was standard 8" and 10" are common. On the other side they were marked 200mm and 250mm. We would lay one with the standard side up and the other with the metric side up. Jr birdman was then sent to the tool box to get the metric crescent wrench. Protests would ensue resulting in the Sgt walking new guy over and showing him that such a thing did exist, explaining that the difference was how the barrel moved the jaw thus effecting at what intervals the spacing best fit metric or standard. Hilarity reigned....ahh good times.

       

      And if you think that was bad you should have seen what happened when we sent them to the runway manager for 100 yards of flight line or too Security Forces to get a bottle of Caynienpea solution.

       

       

       

       

      In Australia most adjustable wrenches are known as shifting spanners or more commonly as "Shifters" and except for the older ones made before metrification are marked with the metric as per the picture above.

      While in the Airforce I sent many an apprentice to the store for cans of prop wash, striped safety paint or to the motor transport mechanics for tins of manifold vacuum, not to mention left hand screwdrivers and the traditional "Long Weight" and of course as mentioned cans of K9P from the police dog section.

      This was considered as a right of passage to trademanship.

      More recently at a bar I asked the barman for a glass of "Chateau Shoalhaven".

      By way of explanation Shoalhaven City is where I live and the local city council controls the water supply.

      What I was really after was a glass of water, but the barman searched the wine selection for about 5 minutes before telling me that they did not stock that variety of wine.

       

    • May 1, 2017 10:36 PM EDT
    • We sent the guy on a wild goose chase, I guess you had to be there and know this guy who made us all crazy.

       

      Greg