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    • February 18, 2017 10:03 PM EST
    • After using a couple of techniques I can make some observations. The color of the media your using makes a ton of difference. Coffee grounds being dark yields a very dark color and saw dust from pine yields a very light color. I made two different greens with the same acrylic paint and ended up with very different results.

       

      Also David M made the wise observation about coffee grounds potentially producing mold. So far I haven't seen any but its only been a month.

       

      All and all both work great. And my diorama smells like coffee

    • February 16, 2017 8:15 AM EST
    • This is a flocking good post.... I mean good flocking post ...... I mean....Oh, nevermind

    • January 5, 2017 11:45 PM EST
    • Korm,

       

      I particularly like this tree

       

       

      I assume this is using the 2 parts oil based paint, 2 parts fine sand, i part saw dust for the bark. Then are you suing that moss just glued to the branches? Any painting of the moss or added flocking (yes Rooster I said flocking). Most of our forests have big tall pines that Ty's pine tree methods (filter fabric on dowels) will work well for. But we do have a particular tree called a Limber Pine at higher elevations that this tree would make a great example of.

       

       

      Also will make a great larger bush as well.

    • January 5, 2017 11:31 PM EST
    • OK the bark on the wire trees is a neat idea.

    • January 5, 2017 11:25 PM EST
    • Hey korm thanks for that link. I haven't even made it too the green stuff yet. But am picking up.many good tips. I love your creative use of the ordinary. The thatched roof is great and the grass. All good stuff again thanks.

    • January 5, 2017 11:17 PM EST
    • Lol

    • January 5, 2017 8:12 PM EST
    • This post has been reported to the moderator by Rooster :  "there is no need to use the word "FLOCKING" that many times in a post especially from Rev Dev"

    • January 5, 2017 8:01 PM EST
    • Devon, you might take a look here: http://www.largescalecentral.com/forums/topic/17297/under-pressure?page=1

      there are mentioned one or two ideas about green things.

    • January 4, 2017 11:55 AM EST
    • Hey I was poking around for DIY ideas for trees and brush and came across this tip for making flocking. It would make great ground cover or even ground finer it could be used to flock filter materiel trees. This uses pencil shavings and paint. Cheap cheap. great idea

       

      https://youtu.be/qAfDM78EnYc

       

      after watching a few more videos these guys are making very nice flocking out of saw dust from the table saw and also old coffee grounds. The mesh strainer they uses yields some courser stuff but window screen would size it down even more. I have a little cheap spice grinder that would powder it. This is a great cheap way to get flocking.

    • December 19, 2016 5:50 AM EST
    • Dan, I use plumbers solder for mechanical joints, and electrical solder for electrical stuff.

    • December 18, 2016 11:12 PM EST
    • Thanks all.  The info was very helpful.  I think I''ll stick with regular solder, but I will try using the plumbers solder I have in my plumbing tool kit.  

    • December 18, 2016 6:17 PM EST
    • Bob "IA3R#7" Cope said:

      Another item that should be considered is a resistance soldering outfit. They are pricey, but they heat control afforded is far superior to any torch or iron. Both the torch and iron take time to heat the elements, and must be applied to both parts. Resistance soldering applies the heat to both parts simultaneously by creating a short circuit, which generates the heat much faster, and therefor more locally and concentrated. I have a devil of a time with the search engine here, but look up the box cab build by either Jon Radder or Bruce Chandler (I forget which).

       

      And when you get real good, you will be able to brass braze the parts together. I have often wondered why the steamies don't use steel sheet and brass braze for the boilers in stead of the brass sheet and silver solder. I would think the steel/brass would be better for the boiler....and stronger allowing higher steam pressures.

       

      Bob C.

      Copper is better at conducting heat, and conducts it more evenly. Also copper will not rust like steel will. Some of the 1:1 locomotives used copper in their boilers, back in the early days. And the hard alloy of copper, can easily withstand the pressures used on scale steam locomotives. 

    • December 18, 2016 6:09 PM EST
    • Bob "IA3R#7" Cope said:

      Another item that should be considered is a resistance soldering outfit. They are pricey, but they heat control afforded is far superior to any torch or iron. Both the torch and iron take time to heat the elements, and must be applied to both parts. Resistance soldering applies the heat to both parts simultaneously by creating a short circuit, which generates the heat much faster, and therefor more locally and concentrated. I have a devil of a time with the search engine here, but look up the box cab build by either Jon Radder or Bruce Chandler (I forget which).

       

      And when you get real good, you will be able to brass braze the parts together. I have often wondered why the steamies don't use steel sheet and brass braze for the boilers in stead of the brass sheet and silver solder. I would think the steel/brass would be better for the boiler....and stronger allowing higher steam pressures.

       

      Bob C.

      Bruce Chandler did the Box cab.  And do our models need to have higher steam pressures. It seems like overkill

    • December 18, 2016 3:15 PM EST
    • Terms, please.

      The plumbers solder with silver in it is referred to as Silver Bearing solder. 420-460 degrees F melting temps. Home Disappointment carries it.

      Jewelry grade Silver Solders have melting points just below pure silver in the 1350 degree F range. Using these solders can result in annealing the metal, which may not be desirable. Use caution relying on  shock quenching which can open pinholes. I use a hot pickle to quench and clean off the melted on flux and coatings I apply.  Mixing powered boric acid in denatured alcohol to make a paste. Apply and burn off alcohol then using a soft flame melt the boric acid to your metal will prevent most discoloration. Powdered not granular BA is available at pharmacies.

      However coating with Battern's self pickling flux can protect the temper, if you are quick. The solders I used were 80 -90% silver because I didn't want visible seams in my silver work. The softer (lower temp) the solder the less silver and more non-silvery metal that can be seen. Solders tend to oxidize faster too.

      My present source for supplies:

      https://www.riogrande.com/

       

      Silver bearing solders are stronger and much more suited for building than the rosin core electrical solders. Most electrical connections are arranged so that the joint does not support the connection.

       

      Only boilers require Silver Solders for strength more than melting temp.

       

      John

    • December 18, 2016 2:46 PM EST
    • Another item that should be considered is a resistance soldering outfit. They are pricey, but they heat control afforded is far superior to any torch or iron. Both the torch and iron take time to heat the elements, and must be applied to both parts. Resistance soldering applies the heat to both parts simultaneously by creating a short circuit, which generates the heat much faster, and therefor more locally and concentrated. I have a devil of a time with the search engine here, but look up the box cab build by either Jon Radder or Bruce Chandler (I forget which).

       

      And when you get real good, you will be able to brass braze the parts together. I have often wondered why the steamies don't use steel sheet and brass braze for the boilers in stead of the brass sheet and silver solder. I would think the steel/brass would be better for the boiler....and stronger allowing higher steam pressures.

       

      Bob C.

    • December 18, 2016 2:29 PM EST
    • Dan,  It depends on your application.  If you are looking for a bit more strength, you can switch to plumbers solder and still be able to solder at relatively the same temperature.   This type of soldering is plenty strong for most things.

       

      Silver soldering is a whole other animal and is a bit more involved. The brass will need to be heated until it is red hot (about 1000 deg.) in order to melt and flow the silver solder. This makes the brass very soft and you will have to quench it to re-harden it.  The solder is actually 50% or more silver making it quite pricey.  Also you will need special flux to go with it.  I am lucky enough to be able to purchase both the solder and flux at a local welding store. One package of solder has lasted my entire ruby bash project with plenty to spare.  You use it very sparingly.  Here is a link to it that may help answer some more questions.

       

      http://www.largescalecentral.com/forums/topic/22725/ruby-bash-1-20-3-0-4-0-build

       

      Basically I use silver solder for boiler work.  It can stand the 300+ degree temps that might start to soften regular solder, and has much more strength to contain the pressure.  I also use it in areas that may be close to the boiler heat and soften.  For all of the cab work and tender I have just used soft solder and it does fine.  A few exceptions are where I will silver solder a big part that I know I'll be doing a lot of other soldering around. This way I don't have to worry about melting that doing the other things.

       

      Please let me know if you have any other questions I didn't cover.

    • December 18, 2016 1:36 PM EST
    • I am soldering brass rod.  Mostly 1/16" diameter.  presently I am using standard rosin core tin/lead solder.  Would silver solder be more appropriate ?   Is it stronger than common electronic solder ?   Where would be a good source ?

    • December 6, 2016 9:14 AM EST
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      Speaking of making louvers, at some point in past I was pondering making one of this http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/bcf1.jpg or this http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/sksxZM12.jpg

       

      Now why did you have to post these pics! Wasn't my build list long enough already? hahaha what is the story behind the first one? Would be a fun build ;)