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    • July 27, 2020 10:38 AM EDT
    • Jon said - "FYI - You probably already know this, but grade percentage calculation is RISE / RUN. In other words: a 10" rise over a run distance of 100" is 0.1 or 1%."

      MMMMMMMMMMMMMM isn't that 10%?  Talk about geared engines.

       

    • July 22, 2020 7:22 AM EDT
    • Korm Kormsen said:

      the first long ones that i bought must be from 1983 or 4.

       

      might have to do with the selling of LGB-track for the first playmobil trains.

      the longer ones might be harder to destroy by playing kids.

       

      the non-funktional cover might be, because the 1:1 scale railroads in Germany have (or had) the throwbars covered in this way.

      Thanks, I think I will remove the non-functional covers on my switches, it just looks more American without it. The thought did come to mind that the cover might be there to protect the points form being stepped on by someone walking in the garden railroad. 

      trainman

    • July 21, 2020 10:51 PM EDT
    • the first long ones that i bought must be from 1983 or 4.

       

      might have to do with the selling of LGB-track for the first playmobil trains.

      the longer ones might be harder to destroy by playing kids.

       

      the non-funktional cover might be, because the 1:1 scale railroads in Germany have (or had) the throwbars covered in this way.

    • July 21, 2020 1:21 PM EDT
    • John, he short ones that I have are from 1979 + and can't remember when they changed, as for the plastic part it's supposed to keep large trash out and over the years found that they are not necessary and th switch is easier to clean without, Bill

    • July 21, 2020 11:43 AM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      yes you are correct the short ones are older, probably changed for expense reasons

      Thanks, 

      Well they must really be old (short points) as I purchased some new back 23 years ago and they are the long points. Question if you know the reason for that plastic part that covers the switch throw bar what does it do, it doesn't stop the throw bar from coming out from between the rails, the rail hold it in place. 

      trainman

    • July 21, 2020 11:02 AM EDT
    • yes you are correct the short ones are older, probably changed for expense reasons

    • July 20, 2020 5:49 PM EDT
    • I was looking on eBay just a short time ago and I see two different LGB 30 degree switches, one with long points back to the frog and one with short points like the ones the 22.5 switches have. I'm assuming the short points on the 30 degree switches are of a much older style, is this correct, or not. Also the tie pattern is different on the two smaller switches. 

      trainman 

    • July 18, 2020 5:27 PM EDT
    • Like the church.  Much better than my Mic project...

       

    • July 18, 2020 4:57 PM EDT
    • Just a quick update on the layout, buildings in place, planting succulents is next but I might wait until the cool season as the summer heat here can be quite brutal to plants that are not well established.

      https://youtu.be/s9iffEIDdQY

    • July 19, 2020 9:53 AM EDT
    • Dan

       

      My track grinder is the LGB track cleaner, some embellishment was intended! Track grinder implies and or sounds more prototypical too. 

       

      Michael

    • July 19, 2020 7:21 AM EDT
    • I for one would never use anything called a 'track grinder' as this implies wearing of the rail.  I use the LGB track cleaner which 'polishes' the rail.

       

    • July 18, 2020 6:34 PM EDT
    • Michael Glavin said:

      Hey Noel, 

       

      I like your concoction and method! But, I could loan you old guys a battery powered track grinder pulling a track cleaning car with green scrubby pad under it. While consuming beverages, making smoke ya'll are cleaning track from your rocking chairs...….

       

      A year and half Noel, how have you managed? HO must have feeled the need.

       

      Michael

      ...............................................

       

      Hi Michael....Darn tracks was so tarnish and crap on them that my wind up Eng.with a pull string, even with two tracking cleaning cars didn't touch much.. lol.

      Ya ... hate to say it but yes.... lots of Ho time was spent.

       

      Hey.. Did get the Trolley line running today tho..............

       

    • July 18, 2020 6:22 PM EDT
    • Other thing once in awhile we have here is a lots of Pine Trees dropping Pine Sap on rails.  WD-40 cleans that up easy and then back to using the home made stuff. 

    • July 18, 2020 6:12 PM EDT
    • Hey Noel, 

       

      I like your concoction and method! But, I could loan you old guys a battery powered track grinder pulling a track cleaning car with green scrubby pad under it. While consuming beverages, making smoke ya'll are cleaning track from your rocking chairs...….

       

      A year and half Noel, how have you managed? HO must have feeled the need.

       

      Michael

    • July 18, 2020 2:18 PM EDT
    • I've been have over the years trouble cleaning up Brass rails that sometime are not used very often. So started to experimenter on some kind of cheap home made fluid that was easy to make and use. 

      I also have seen others having the same problems on here,  so I figure there had to be an easier way.

       

      After playing around with difference ideas that would not seem to hurt the plastic ties so far,  I came up with this make up.

      Take a cleaned empty washed out spray bottle.

      Two cups of Vinegar Distilled White.

      10 to 12 Table spoons of Table Salt.

      Mix well do to salt take a lot of mixing to break down in Vinegar. 

      I sprayed on a 3-M Blue pads, rub on rails back and forth a few time until kind of shinny and let set for a few min's.  Come back over Rails with a Wet or Dry 3-M Green pad. "Keep rinsing out the Green pad to get any dry out left overs if needed."

       

      Shown is what we use. Sanding pole  w/3-M pad if use on ground level so don't have to bend over to clean rails.  We have 4 of these to use.

      Shown is cleaned / dirty area.

      Close up.

       

      I do about 20 foot at a time.

      Shown is around our guys set up area.

       

       

      Our layout is over 700 foot and has been setting for a year and a half now. Do to we run Track power trains, sure did not want to spend days after days trying to get track cleaned up.

      Now, this became so much easier for us old guys.

       

      Hope this help and not sure on your areas on cleaning tracks,  but here in Calif. it is a on going job keep track clean for elect. pick for our trains

    • July 15, 2020 12:13 AM EDT
    • Jon Radder said:

      12" wide ladders confuse me, as does use of 4x4 risers. Are you sure you are not wanting to build bench work?  That is a whole different animal.

       

      Ladder roadbed is usually one track width wide, about 1.75" on center using 1.5" x 4" blocks. The material I used was PVC 1x2 which is actually .75" x1.5". You could use the 1x4 as-is, or  rip it in two.

       

      I used a jig designed by Bruce Chandler for block spacing - just checked it and the blocks are 19" on center.

       

      Most of my ladder is on or near the ground, then back filled. I've experimented with a number of riser materials. I have some thick wall aluminum conduit that I have tried, I don't like it because it won't take a self-taping screw. I have used Pressure Treated 1x2 driven down between the ladder, which works well, but now I am concerned that they are probably getting rotten being fully buried. In my case PVC 1x2 would work, but it can't be driven into hard soil and it will flex if it extends more than a few inches above the soil. If you use PVC Pipe, I would stay with Schedule 40. The regular water pipe is too flexible.  In all cases I find that the roadbed gets pushed up each winter from frost heave. It's easy to push back down if you time it right. You probably won't have that problem in Texas.

       

      Why don't you give us a better idea of your overall plan and I'm sure one of us has done something similar.

      Diagram of construction and build, this should answer your questions, trainman

    • July 14, 2020 5:42 PM EDT
    • 12" wide ladders confuse me, as does use of 4x4 risers. Are you sure you are not wanting to build bench work?  That is a whole different animal.

       

      Ladder roadbed is usually one track width wide, about 1.75" on center using 1.5" x 4" blocks. The material I used was PVC 1x2 which is actually .75" x1.5". You could use the 1x4 as-is, or  rip it in two.

       

      I used a jig designed by Bruce Chandler for block spacing - just checked it and the blocks are 19" on center.

       

      Most of my ladder is on or near the ground, then back filled. I've experimented with a number of riser materials. I have some thick wall aluminum conduit that I have tried, I don't like it because it won't take a self-taping screw. I have used Pressure Treated 1x2 driven down between the ladder, which works well, but now I am concerned that they are probably getting rotten being fully buried. In my case PVC 1x2 would work, but it can't be driven into hard soil and it will flex if it extends more than a few inches above the soil. If you use PVC Pipe, I would stay with Schedule 40. The regular water pipe is too flexible.  In all cases I find that the roadbed gets pushed up each winter from frost heave. It's easy to push back down if you time it right. You probably won't have that problem in Texas.

       

      Why don't you give us a better idea of your overall plan and I'm sure one of us has done something similar.