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    • May 24, 2017 10:01 PM EDT
    • Bob Hyman said:

      Chris,

      The fake rocks are made from acrylic.  Same stuff as used in spas and pools.  They're only about a quarter of an inch thick and are fairly lightweight.  I got three of them (all identical) at Home Depot a few years ago when they were on close-out for $25 each.  I seem to remember the original price was around $80 each.

       

       

      I don't know if it's a nationwide sale, or local for the Chicagoland area, but Menards has fake rocks on sale this weekend, saw it in their Memorial Day weekend flier this evening. $20 for small, $25 medium, $30 large.

       

    • May 24, 2017 9:40 PM EDT
    • Great looking track work!   Looks like some high speed running is called for.

    • May 24, 2017 8:37 PM EDT
    • Ric Golding said:

      Nice work Bob!  Great pictures and track work!

      Suck up!

    • May 24, 2017 7:53 PM EDT
    • Here you go Devon.  This is the only way to lift heavy rocks!

      Looks like Bob has been working out.....

    • May 24, 2017 9:31 AM EDT
    • Yeah I need those rocks

    • May 23, 2017 10:17 PM EDT
    • Nice work Bob!  Great pictures and track work!

    • May 23, 2017 2:43 PM EDT
    • AH, I was hoping you used your mad skills and made them.

       

      Thank,

      Chris

    • May 23, 2017 2:37 PM EDT
    • Chris,

      The fake rocks are made from acrylic.  Same stuff as used in spas and pools.  They're only about a quarter of an inch thick and are fairly lightweight.  I got three of them (all identical) at Home Depot a few years ago when they were on close-out for $25 each.  I seem to remember the original price was around $80 each.

    • May 23, 2017 2:33 PM EDT
    • What did you make those out of Bob?

       

      Chris

    • May 23, 2017 2:28 PM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

      Fake rocks? That's where I went wrong. If I would have used fake rocks I might not feel like I have went ten rounds with Floyd Mayweather.

       

      Here you go Devon.  This is the only way to lift heavy rocks!

       

       

    • May 23, 2017 10:04 AM EDT
    • Chris,

      Here is the original conceptual track plan that I posted on my website back on July 1, 2011.  The perimeter block wall and the existing trees (black dots) were surveyed and are shown in their exact positions.  The layout is approximately 160 feet long and about 60 feet wide.  A lot has changed since then.  Some of the original oak trees have died and been removed.  I added a gazebo in the center of the layout.  I added a fourth pond and another stream in the area where the original logging area was to go.

       

       

      Here is the link to a larger, higher resolution copy of the above image: http://largescalecentral.com/filesharing/file/view/3354/layout-jpg

       

      Here is the link to the original concept post on my web site:  http://www.rhyman.org/archives/160

       

      I've tried to stay close to the original concept, but -- just as in real life -- things change.  Right now, I'm just "winging it" as I go.

       

      Bob

    • May 23, 2017 8:10 AM EDT
    • Good looking update Bob.  Do you have a plan for your track or are you just winging it based off your schematic?

       

      Chris

    • May 22, 2017 10:42 PM EDT
    • Fake rocks? That's where I went wrong. If I would have used fake rocks I might not feel like I have went ten rounds with Floyd Mayweather.

       

      That is really looking great Bob. Is that crushed granite really brown/tan? I like the color of that stuff.

    • May 22, 2017 3:39 PM EDT
    • Bob said:  The fake rock in the foreground covers the well head for my water well.  That's why the roadbed curves around it rather than following the blocks.

       

       

      That's what happens in real life, too.  Rather than spend the bucks to blast their way through solid rock, they just build a small chicane.

    • May 22, 2017 3:30 PM EDT
    • Lookin' good, Bob. 

    • May 22, 2017 2:36 PM EDT
    • We've got rain moving in so I shot a few quick photos at lunchtime to show you the progress.  Here is the view looking west standing on the walkway.  The track on the left is the log dump, the one in the center is a general purpose/team track/log car storage after dumping, etc.  They come together at a #4 wye turnout.  (This has the same curvature as a #8L and a #8R superimposed on each other.) The track on the right is the main.  Immediately after crossing the walkway a passing siding diverges with a #10R turnout.  A bit further down, the switching lead diverges on a curved #10L turnout.

       

       

      Here is a view of the same area, looking south toward the pond.  It gives you a better look at the wye turnout for the log dump and the curved #10 turnout to the switching lead.

       

       

      Here is a view of the tracks in the saw mill area.  From bottom to top: main, passing siding, switching lead, mill track #1, and mill track #2.  The saw mill will go in the space between mill track #2 and the rocks.

       

       

      Here is the view from the west end of Sawpit looking east.  The track at the bottom is the main coming down from Windy Point, diverging onto a passing track with a #10R turnout.  All other turnouts in this view are #8's.  On the right is the spur to the coal mine.  This spur also serves as a switching lead for the two mill tracks.

       

       

      Here is a shot of the track being placed on the ladder roadbed around Windy Point.

       

       

      And here is where I ran out of decomposed granite.  6400 pounds doesn't really go very far!  This is also where I ran out of brown spray paint for the ladder roadbed.

       

       

      Here is the unpainted roadbed at the future town of Kalin Junction at the top of the climb around Windy Point.  This will be a major interchange point for the inner and outer loops.  For now, I'm just passing through in order to get the outer loop completed.  The fake rock in the foreground covers the well head for my water well.  That's why the roadbed curves around it rather than following the blocks.

       

       

      Here is the view of the south side of the layout just past Kalin Junction.  Nothing much planned for this area but a single track main.  The pieces of PVC on the cardboard are the stakes I drive into the ground through the ladder about every two feet or so.

       

       

      Here is the future town site of Aurora.  A single passing track with a couple of industrial sidings.  Current plans are for a barrel factory (a place to send finished lumber from the mill) and something else (TBD).

       

       

      Here is the view from the end of the ladder roadbed looking northwest.

       

       

      And finally, an overview of Sawpit taken from the foot bridge over Jocelyn Creek above the pond.

       

       

      I still have lots to do, but I'm making progress.  Still shooting for a mid-June golden spike for the outer loop!

       

      More to come,

      Bob

    • May 22, 2017 8:20 AM EDT
    • Bob Hyman said:

       

      P.S.  I'm already planning two more trips back east this summer.  One to WV in July for a family reunion (with a side trip to Cass and Durbin), and one in August to see Bob's and Stan's layouts.

      You will definitely be inspired by those 2 layouts!!................

    • May 22, 2017 7:59 AM EDT
    • David Maynard said:
      ....but it did scare the doo doo out of me.

       

      See, it helped you out.  Doctors would charge you considerably for the same thing. 

    • May 22, 2017 5:42 AM EDT
    • Chris Kieffer said:

      Come on Bob, a little lightning never hurt anyone. 

       

      Chris

      Well. Ok, the lightning didn't hurt me when it blew branches off the tree I was under, but it did scare the doo doo out of me.

    • May 23, 2017 11:48 AM EDT
    • Craig-

      In regards to what Dirk used, are you talking about what he put on top of the PVC pipe then the track on top of that? I think he called it Hardy Board. Something like a cement house siding material if memory serves right.