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    • September 23, 2018 4:13 PM EDT
    • Very impressive! Keep up the good work and the pictures coming with updates.

    • September 18, 2018 2:19 PM EDT
    • You could cut a door in the wooden screen and reach from the back side and load and unload the box car! 

    • September 18, 2018 10:58 AM EDT
    • Well done!

    • September 18, 2018 6:48 AM EDT
    • Let’s go to part two of the furniture works.

      The two wall segments without windows got cut on the table saw to make the small side wall segments of the relief structure.

      I rearranged the walls of the building from the original idea to a 2×4 pattern, which fits better into the space I have available. The first ideas came out to big in my opinion. I glued each floor level together and finally both wall segments together.

      Bild

      To enforce the whole structure, I added plastic channels and triangles on the inside.

      Before I installed the windows and doors, I gave all bricks a wash of thinned brown paint to blend the bright cream bricks more into a brownish-yellow.

      Bild

      The blue windows got also repainted and with the roof in place, the main part is done.

      Still missing are the foundation and some details parts.

      Cheers, Gerd

    • September 20, 2018 11:22 PM EDT
    • Shane Stewart said:

      That's correct John. If you burn off an axle, they might get you over the bridge, but anything more serious and you're in big trouble.

       

      Battle River Trestle out of Edmonton in 2012. Track speed on bridge is 40MPH.. 17 cars went over the edge. Thankfully it happened 30 behind the locomotives.

      The bolted rail in the center of the photo is one of the guard rails. (photo from CN foreman)

       

      Well that was what the designers said.... forces have changed ... maybe they need Aristo flanges!

    • September 20, 2018 10:26 PM EDT
    • That's correct John. If you burn off an axle, they might get you over the bridge, but anything more serious and you're in big trouble.

       

      Battle River Trestle out of Edmonton in 2012. Track speed on bridge is 40MPH.. 17 cars went over the edge. Thankfully it happened 30 behind the locomotives.

      The bolted rail in the center of the photo is one of the guard rails. (photo from CN foreman)

       

    • September 20, 2018 9:06 PM EDT
    • guardrails for optical reasons (bridges etc.) i just place against the raised molding of tie plates (on LGB track) (see mock-up in upper left corner), leaving a somewhat bigger gap.

      where i put guardrails against actual derailment hazards, i cut out the railfoot of the guardrail, to place it nearer the main-rail.

      depending on visibility of the affected spot, i either nail the guardrails down, or fasten them with glue. easy does it (said the lazy)

       

    • September 20, 2018 8:22 PM EDT
    • Yes, they don't rerail the car. There is no lifting mechanism to lift the other wheel up and over its rail to put its flange back on the inside of the rail . The spacing of the guard rail is such that it will place the other wheel on the axle near its running rail, like John said, to try and keep the car upright. Guard rails are usually made from a lighter rail the the running rails, rail that is no longer usable for running rails. Over the years of running and rebuilding the trolley line near my house, the lighter rails became guard rails. During the last major rebuild, one of those rails was donated to the Arden Trolley Museum. It is stamped with the original railroad's initials (P&CSRR) and the date it was made (1871).

    • September 20, 2018 7:27 PM EDT
    • They are not rerailers, the inner rails and/or heavy timbers on the tie ends were designed to keep the derailed equipment on the bridge/trestle. Upright cars are easier to rerail than junkers pitched over the side.

      They should be inboard enough that the whole wheel can land on the ties, journal boxes included if the rails are tall.

    • September 20, 2018 3:09 PM EDT
    • Looks good Bill.

       

      They are still used to this day. Unfortunately, they aren't very effective. Modern trains are too big and heavy. If a single car is derailed, they have a chance, but multiple derailed cars will shred everything.

       

      Shane

       

    • September 20, 2018 2:23 PM EDT
    •   I had posterail guardsd this previously on GRW forum and changed a few thing at Greg E suggestions and though I would repost it here:rail guard ends
       
      While out scrounging for old track I came across this piece that use to be on my LGB 4' bridge and I thought this might be interesting to those new into the hobby for added detail to their layout. Rerailers properly called guards rails, on both bridges and trestles were very common on the original days of railroading where jumping the track could have disastrous consequences as a car could go over the side taking more cars with it and create havoc and destruction to both bridges and trestles. As to modern day building, you would have to consult some one other than me as when it gets past steam I'm lost. The though was by adding a second rail usually a lighter rail just inside the outer rail, if the car started to jump the track ( derail) the inner rail would keep the flange it in place and keep the car on the bridge and usually at the beginning of the section the inner rail was bent in towards the other side, that way if the car was derailed before it got there it would steer the wheel into the space between the outer and inner rail.
         Enough history, and I hope it is correct, doing it to your layout is very easy. Real railroads just used another piece of track, but adding rail to a molded sleeper/tie raises the rail just a bit as the running rail is usually set in a smooth section but raising it up a little on the seen section and is not good if you are running any type of rail cleaner, whether it be brushes or pads they will clean the rerailers and not touch your mainline. Easily solved using a lower height/code rail, 250 code is what I use and I bought aluminum as it was cheap and easy to bend. Start with deciding how long it needs to be then cutting a "V" in the beginning end and end section between the steel railhead and the securing flange and pinch together so that the offending wheel has a ramp to ride up on. I marked mine on the top, turned the affected section and secured with drilling and installing withsmall screws. Before attaching I painted with a rattle/spray can some red oxide. You will be surprised how many people coming to your layout will comment on "what's that" for, just something that they will take home to remember yours over others, seeable different details is where it's at. Bill

    • September 18, 2018 1:37 PM EDT
    • I think he meant "the original LGB is gone". and while he of course knows Marklin owns LGB, who is actually making the track (and thus the quality/materials) is unknown.

       

      Greg

    • September 18, 2018 10:14 AM EDT
    • John Bouck said:

      My LGB ties have been out in the weather for 15 years without any fading, disintegration or anything. But things change. LGB is gone and I don't know who makes their track now. Or if they use the same formula.

      LGB is gone??? I am not sure about that statement,but I have already been wrong once or twice today, and its only 7:15am

       

    • September 18, 2018 12:20 AM EDT
    • Fantastic weathering effect, a lot of work, but the results! Take a bow!

       

      Steve, They seemed to have changed the Turtle Wax product... and it's thicker and does not "flow" as well across the ties... the original Armorall was pretty watery and with low surface tension would wick into the nooks and crannies... The newer formulation of Turtle wax "knockoff" is more like a gel. When you spray 850 feet of track, you want the process fast and efficient... and easy! The thicker product did not flow and cover evenly unless you used way more.

       

      Greg

    • September 17, 2018 10:49 PM EDT
    • Rocky Canyonero said:

      Hi Stan,

      Have you ever tried to paint the Bachmann ties at all?  Would that possibly have a negative affect?

       

      I'd like to cover some of the sheen of the SS as I had done with my AL track in the past.  I would normally assemble the track (pre-bending when needed) and then painting it all together with satin black spray paint. 

       

      I wouldn't mind even having to re-paint the ties in the future if that was needed. I still have some very old Aristo ties that faded years ago, but seemed to have been saved by painting them.  

       

      Thanks to all for your advice and concern,

      Jeff

      Since I was mentioned ... I don't have those ties, so I held back, but if your rails stay in gauge and the rails don't roll ... I'd paint.

      My Aristo's  were 12 years in direct S. Aridzona sun. More days of 100+ than you can comprehend ... My ties had faded to 3 shades of grey.

      I painted my ties in different shades of brown, from tan to black walnut (new ties), Cammo Brown is an excellent 1 year old tie ... btw. It's flat too.

      I painted them in place ... A fun note: While at Costco I grabbed some new Goodyear windshield wipers and low and behold, each one had a plastic guard that would snap over a rail and it's wide base covered the rail's foot, I ended up with several changes ... back to those 100+ days and 9' was a nice stretch to paint, both sides and from both ends, from slightly above. Paint and Ponder.

       

      I stained my stainless. Took about a year to do 140', more rain would have helped ...

      Rust is not one color and the randomness of nature is hard for me to paint... so I enlisted rust.

      Steel wool pulled and rolled into 'snakes' a thousand clothespins later. I dissolved the steel wool and used an Acrylic clear coat to mist over the rails. Some clear coats blew the rust away!

      I think it was worth it ...

      I find that the color makes the rails less tall. Win win.

    • September 17, 2018 8:57 PM EDT
    • Greg Elmassian said:

      Went back to actual armorall in the "original" formula... spray tracks every 6 months with a garden sprayer... much quicker.. still looks good about 10 years later...

       

      Greg

      Why did you make the change back?  Were you getting bad results with Turtle Wax, or did it become hard to find?

    • September 16, 2018 10:56 PM EDT
    • Went back to actual armorall in the "original" formula... spray tracks every 6 months with a garden sprayer... much quicker.. still looks good about 10 years later...

       

      Greg

    • September 16, 2018 4:13 PM EDT
    • Gregg, are you still using the Turtle Wax knockoff of Armor All to spray the ties?

    • September 16, 2018 3:20 PM EDT
    • Jeff check out what John Caughey has done to weather his rails, looks fantastic, since it's real rust!

       

      Greg

    • September 16, 2018 2:45 PM EDT
    • Hi Stan,

      Have you ever tried to paint the Bachmann ties at all?  Would that possibly have a negative affect?

       

      I'd like to cover some of the sheen of the SS as I had done with my AL track in the past.  I would normally assemble the track (pre-bending when needed) and then painting it all together with satin black spray paint. 

       

      I wouldn't mind even having to re-paint the ties in the future if that was needed. I still have some very old Aristo ties that faded years ago, but seemed to have been saved by painting them.  

       

      Thanks to all for your advice and concern,

      Jeff