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    • July 10, 2020 11:07 PM EDT
    • Nice, those are 'bents'.

    • July 10, 2020 7:41 PM EDT
    • Some trestles.  My first ever

    • July 9, 2020 1:14 PM EDT
    • Don't worry, I see a thin rock quarry off to the right so you might raise your bottom!

    • July 9, 2020 11:45 AM EDT
    • Track laid out to see how the loco will run... hoping I can get away with a 6% grade.

       

    • July 6, 2020 9:23 PM EDT
    • The flatter you can keep the railroad the better the operation period.

      Unless there is a specific reason for grades (as in my case, trying to keep everythig at a reasonable height above ground) 

      everything should be dead level.

      Just my opinion

      Rick

    • July 6, 2020 7:51 PM EDT
    • i have achieved 6% (1 in 17) grades with short, heavy locos, motorized tenders, additional weight and only five short cars.

      but on my next layout there will be nothing steeper than 3 or 4%.

    • July 6, 2020 1:03 PM EDT
    • Boy, that's a good point.  I had not been thinking about wearing out the engines.  So yeah, just because it "can" doesn't mean it "should".

    • July 6, 2020 1:01 PM EDT
    • I love a well thought out something! Should be fun!

      Don't wear out your engines on steep grades. We have no repair parts.

    • July 6, 2020 12:25 PM EDT
    •    Sweet. Keep us posted for sure.

       

    • July 6, 2020 10:34 AM EDT
    • Since the South Tiburon and Raccoon Straits RR will be using a fair bit of elevated railway, I thought I'd post it here.  This will start out as a basic dogbone, with both turnaround loops extending over sloped grade, and will need elevation to attain a reasonable grade for the trains.  Since this is a sightseeing and logging line, I can accept a little more steepness, but not a lot, of course.  Stage 1 will be some experimenting.

      In that vein, the first step is the Western loop: a simple loop made of redwood fence boards that will be supported by.... something...

       

    • July 6, 2020 10:02 PM EDT
    • Thanks for finding the pics, interesting what can be done if one wants to tackle it. Fred Mills pretty much summed it up and that's just go with the larger radius switches to start with and be done with it. Thanks for all the input, it keeps me thinking about what to do next.

       

      trainman  

    • July 6, 2020 7:24 PM EDT
    • found it!

       

       

       

      i thought, that i knew, that i had made copies from these pics....

      but it was in 2015, that i copied them.

       

      these are, where only the outgoing legs are altered (straightened)

       

       

       

       

       

      and these are how to make it even straighter, by modifying (slimming) the frog as well.

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • July 6, 2020 7:15 PM EDT
    • So far, John, you have not been led astray, however...

          From my many years of experience, with just the same rolling stock you describe, after starting out with a few of the 4 foot radius LGB Switches, I soon got rid of them , and stayed with the "1600's" I would never suggest even purchasing the 4 foot radius switches, except for running around a Christmas tree.

           As soon as Aristo came out with their so-called Wide Radius (10 foot diameter) switches; they became my minimum "Radius" switch, carrying on to the present.

        Yes you could get away with what you have, and use those 4foot diameter switches, BUT....look to the future, and the experiences you have yet to enjoy, and the frustrations too....they happen to us all.

        STICK WITH the WIDEST RADIUS SWITCHES, and avoid the disappointments of the   narrower switches.....

              Some day the OPERATIONS bug may hit you, and help you to enjoy, not just a train, but a whole railroad, doing what a real railroad does in real life....deliver goods, and passengers to towns, and industries..., not just running in circles, and having friends and children ask you, "Gee, it looks nice, but, kind sir;  WHAT ELSE DOES IT DO ?"

           Please...please, don't take this suggestion be taken in any way as an insult.  It is very true, that everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, is perfectly free to build their railroad, to please themselves....not just me, or anyone else for that matter.  

          Fred Mills 

    • July 6, 2020 6:36 PM EDT
    • sorry, but Alzheimer-light has kicked in.

      i don't remember, where i saw it one or two years ago.

    • July 6, 2020 8:02 AM EDT
    • Korm Kormsen said:

      if you are into bashing things, there might be a solution, that is friendly to the purse.

      if you take a 1200 switch, with the curved leg being a 30° curve, you can see, that the frog is at about 2/3 lenght of this curve.

      leaving the working part of the switch alone, you could straighten the third of the mentioned curve behind the frog.

      one third of 30° means, your switch gets about 10° less curved.

      so, it would be about the same as the 1600's 22.5°.

      you would save some money and space.

       

      no, i have not done this myself - yet.

      but i saw pics and read descriptions in a forum (here, maybe?)

      If you know where the article is on the forum please let me know, I will look for it myself. As we all want to do our RR for less $'s, many times it just not feasible to do things that require a lot of time and effort. I feel I can do it, but some things say, just buy what you want and be done with it.

       

      trainman

    • July 5, 2020 10:25 PM EDT
    • Bill Barnwell said:

      LGB moguls will run on 1200 series switches but will slow a little, and LGB never made any 1500 switches only 1600 which is 8' diameter

      My error on the 1500, you would think I would know what I purchased 35 years ago.

       

      trainman

    • July 5, 2020 7:21 PM EDT
    • if you are into bashing things, there might be a solution, that is friendly to the purse.

      if you take a 1200 switch, with the curved leg being a 30° curve, you can see, that the frog is at about 2/3 lenght of this curve.

      leaving the working part of the switch alone, you could straighten the third of the mentioned curve behind the frog.

      one third of 30° means, your switch gets about 10° less curved.

      so, it would be about the same as the 1600's 22.5°.

      you would save some money and space.

       

      no, i have not done this myself - yet.

      but i saw pics and read descriptions in a forum (here, maybe?)

    • July 6, 2020 2:50 PM EDT
    • Thanks, I'm planning on leaving it "as is" for a while. I have a lot of stuff to be tested on it, I suspect that the turnouts are going to be finiky. Once I am satisfied with how things run I will chicken grit the track ballast. I have quite a bit of things to do with it, those buildings are in need of refurbishing, I have to try a full setup with all the structures I have been bashing all these years. And I have to decide what to keep and what to shed train wise.

    • July 6, 2020 11:48 AM EDT
    • Looking good Vic. I hope you are not like me in that as soon as trains are running, progress on finishing stalls!

    • July 6, 2020 11:17 AM EDT
    • Had a productive weekend, a VERY productive weekend. I have reached SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION.

      After spending thursday and friday setting out the pavers and bricks, I spent saturday and sunday moving the gravel from the far side of the garage to the layout. Between the pavers under the building locations and roadways and using bricks under the tracks I ended up needed far less gravel than I originally estimated. Back then I planned to fill the planter then float the track and buildings on top like I did way back with my first layout, it's even what I did with the outdoor pizza. but using the paver/brick method saved a lot of time and effort. For now I am going to leave the bricks under the tracks exposed so I can test trains and make any necessary track tweeks for operation. Now comes detailing and testing trains.

      But today is a milestone, I actually finished something