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    • April 29, 2020 10:42 AM EDT
    • Nicely done.

      Well crafted to submit to Garden Railways and encourage others to do a not-too-difficult project.

    • April 29, 2020 6:23 AM EDT
    • Nicely processed. I'll look forward to new happenings

    • April 28, 2020 10:11 PM EDT
    • Greetings folks, and hopefully all of you are well with the state of things in this world presently. As of today (4/28/2020) I have finished the final assembly of a 2-axle tank car kitbash, comprising the stubby shell of an Aristocraft 40101 20ft tank car, and the chassis of a Bachmann Lil-Big-Hauler 2-axle passenger coach. This brown tanker is the product of curiosity and desiring more tank wagons, (always need more!) as well as the confirmation of Aristo's bobber caboose chassis not looking all that great under anything but their cabeese, hence the transplant.

      The initial inspection and comparison to my modified British tank wagon (on 31mm axles for those curious) and other cars. Right away the flat body, overweight brake wheel, caboose steps and faux toolboxes looked... Funky altogether. The caboose chassis stuffed under short bodies to my eyeballs is not the greatest combination, and as such, the caboose/flat thingy was the first thing to go, and was removed and later sold on the 'Bay. What occurred next was mad science consisting of plopping the tank onto various flat chassis to see what worked and didn't.

      First up was an LGB Euro 2-axle flatcar. Nope.

      Next was the chassis of that little brown LBH boxcar seen up there earlier. This looked interesting, albeit a bit short on the length department.

      Conceptualizing wooden end beams was interesting to see, but the coupler became a bit obscured under that chunk of timber. Perhaps a longer car...?

      The slightly longer chassis for Bachmann's L-B-H coaches looked promising with more length and those built-in steps, but with those big foopy hoopy coach handrails? And what about those sky-high brakewheel rods with wheels touching the tank?

      With the subsequent purchase of a log-car-thing off the 'Bay that provided an empty coach chassis with free glue damage, at least two sessions of contemplative evening staring occurred, with some Xacto work mingled among the minutes of eyeballing, resulting in the cutting of the outward mounting tabs keeping the shell aloft from the chassis.

      After that, I took off the aforementioned bendy plastic end rods, and with some wood planking (coffee stirrers narrow and wide) and spare railings combined, fabbed a handrail setup that lays low and covers the original mounting holes, as well as spacers that cover the cast holes for the brakes and keep the tank's feet spaced evenly on the chassis.

      ...And in conjunction, did some creative drilling of the mounting tubes on the ends, cut off the bottom tabs of of the brake rods, and glued them in on the bottom, effectively lowering the brake wheels to match the low height of the handrails with the limited room around that big fat tank body.

      After the construction, it was soon time to paint, and the base color of choice was to remain brown-ish, starting with a spritzing of London Gray.

      With only the number and some data masked, all that Pennsy lettering was soon lost to obscurity. 1952 is far too new anyway.

      After the initial sprays, my usual mayhem of drybrush weathering took place on the tank and chassis. Looking a bit overwhelmingly messy and corroded at first.

      With another couple spritzings of the London Gray to fade the first draft of weathering some, I did another brushing of brown-er and wetter paint. Various minor scuffs and mold dents add variety and were free.

      After my usual coatings of Krylon Matte Finish and several days of drying and setting time, I then drilled two holes through the chassis centerline and the center of the mounting feet of the tank body, adding two decent-length screws to secure the body tightly to the chassis. With a pair of the usual Bachmann metal 31mm wheels snapped into place, it was then time for Tanker #489 to join the 2-axle fleet for revenue service on the shelf line.

      Zooming along with a blue-grey British friend, and looking excellent in motion.

      And finally, an image taken outside in natural evening light, with hints of old lettering sleeping beneath the grime and residues. The culmination of slapping two different things together resulted in an interesting new addition to the colonial-export roster, and as it turns out, it isn't all that far removed from reality.

    • April 28, 2020 6:00 AM EDT
    • I am not giving up my Tyco 10 wheelers.

       

      The amusement park train that used to run at Conneaut Lake Park had a steam outline, but was actually powered with a gas engine in the tender. So extending the stack on an amusement park train may not be necessary.

    • April 27, 2020 8:39 PM EDT
    • Another thing to note is that 15 inch gauge was also popular for both estate (i.e. for pleasure) railways and amusement park railways.  Regular HO equipment could be modified with things like seats on tender coal bunkers and open-roofed freight and passenger stock modified with two to five seats per car, depending on length.  Large scale figures could then be posed running the locomotive and enjoying the train ride.  The two foot gauge Crown Metal Products steamer I ran at Hershey Park was also available in a smaller, 15 inch gauge version.  You may want to extend the locomotive's smoke stake to keep smoke and cinders out of the engineer's eyes.  (Older HO locomotives that are good runners, and not necessarily super detailed, would work fine for this kind of "role.")

       

      Have fun, David Meashey

    • April 27, 2020 7:58 PM EDT
    • Cliff Jennings said:
       If I weren't joined at the hip with the V&T, I'd be headed in this direction for sure!

       

      You know how these things go, model a V&T flat or two hauling some 15in, 18in, equipment for a hypothetical mine tram in some hypothetical location, and the dark side will have you and and it will be all downhill from there ...

    • April 27, 2020 7:23 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      Cool!  I had no idea folks modeled in this scale / gage.  I flagged the model's website, Bob, against future "need."  I've no intention in dabbling in this scale (1:24-sh PLAYMOBIL Scale is fine for me!), but I am learning to look for opportunity in other scales, hobbies, and sources.

       

      Eric

       

       

      Eric,

        Please note the simplicity of the cars and try not to overthink (cane cars)!  Scale and gauge matter not as it's still the same frame up and weathering make a world of difference .....

       

      Just saying

    • April 27, 2020 5:27 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      Cool!  I had no idea folks modeled in this scale / gage.  I flagged the model's website, Bob, against future "need."  I've no intention in dabbling in this scale (1:24-sh PLAYMOBIL Scale is fine for me!), but I am learning to look for opportunity in other scales, hobbies, and sources.

       

      Eric

       

      Some fun sites to poke around  for Gn15 are Gnatterbox and Carl Arendt's archives. If I weren't joined at the hip with the V&T, I'd be headed in this direction for sure!

       

      Gorgeous work, Bob!

       

      Cliff

       

       

       

    • April 27, 2020 3:45 PM EDT
    • Eric Mueller said:

      Cool!  I had no idea folks modeled in this scale / gage.  I flagged the model's website, Bob, against future "need."  I've no intention in dabbling in this scale (1:24-sh PLAYMOBIL Scale is fine for me!), but I am learning to look for opportunity in other scales, hobbies, and sources.

       

      Eric

      Yea, this stuff is pretty neat, and a lot of the cars can be used in the varying large scales.

    • April 27, 2020 3:28 PM EDT
    • Cool!  I had no idea folks modeled in this scale / gage.  I flagged the model's website, Bob, against future "need."  I've no intention in dabbling in this scale (1:24-sh PLAYMOBIL Scale is fine for me!), but I am learning to look for opportunity in other scales, hobbies, and sources.

       

      Eric

    • April 27, 2020 2:55 PM EDT
    • Is it "mine cars" or "mein kampf"

    • April 27, 2020 12:37 PM EDT
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      Gn15 is a pretty cool scale and gauge combination, people have been doing really inventive, and quality, work in it for some time.

      Hmm, wonder how much chunks of coal that size to G people would each weigh in real life?

      I guess that would depend on what type of coal it is.

    • April 27, 2020 12:31 PM EDT
    • Forrest Scott Wood said:

      Gn15 is a pretty cool scale and gauge combination, people have been doing really inventive, and quality, work in it for some time.

      Hmm, wonder how much chunks of coal that size to G people would each weigh in real life?

      Using the scale ruler, the largest chunks arent quite a foot across the largest dimension, pretty typical size for run-of-mine coal.

    • April 27, 2020 12:09 PM EDT
    • I got the Heywood book for christmas. Took me a while to read it  but it's full of interesting stuff about "minimum gauge railways".

    • April 27, 2020 12:03 PM EDT
    • Gn15 is a pretty cool scale and gauge combination, people have been doing really inventive, and quality, work in it for some time.

      Hmm, wonder how much chunks of coal that size to G people would each weigh in real life?

    • April 25, 2020 12:32 PM EDT
    • Tac, all I can say is make sure you have good tools. Especially nut-drivers for those little M2 and M2.5 bolts.

    • April 25, 2020 7:06 AM EDT
    • Al Pomeroy said:

      Accucraft vehicles have a very convoluted assembly method. best bet is to find the screws and remove till it comes apart. my Accucraft c-19 requires many screws be removed to separate the boiler from the frame. there was really no consideration of servicing these after the sale (typical Chinese mentality)

      I used to have one but sold it off many years ago.

       

      AL P.

       

      Mornin', Al, thanks for the call, and the reminder.  About four years ago a visitor to our club/association track over at Ramsey Mereside picked up my Accucraft K-27 by putting his fingers underneath the headlamp and cab roof.  The as he lifted it clear of the tracks, the headlamp came off and he dropped the whole thing.  The amount of dismantling I had to undertake to get enough of the locomotive stripped so that I could literally place a long sash-cramp on the frames to straighten them out would make a long work of non-fiction.  I swear that the thing had as many bits as the full-size loco. 

    • April 25, 2020 6:57 AM EDT
    • Mornin', Fred.  Taking the trucks off is not a problem, even though they are wired in to the internal circuit for the marker lights.  Even taking off the only non-metallic bits - the gladhand hoses - is not a problem, after all, I put them on when I got the model.  It's the sequence, if there is one, of many teeny screws underneath the body that obviously connect the underparts to the body proper that concerns me most.

       

      I'm familiar with having to refinish models made of all kinds of materials, from brass to balsa wood, so that part of it is not a problem.  I was just hoping that somebody here might have found themselves having to dismantle one of these rare and costy models, and then mantle it again so that it looks the same as it did before they began.  Please feel free to say trucks - bogies hereabouts are what people in North America call 'boogers'.  I personally prefer the word 'snoticles'.  

    • April 25, 2020 6:56 AM EDT
    • Accucraft vehicles have a very convoluted assembly method. best bet is to find the screws and remove till it comes apart. my Accucraft c-19 requires many screws be removed to separate the boiler from the frame. there was really no consideration of servicing these after the sale (typical Chinese mentality)

      I used to have one but sold it off many years ago.

       

      AL P.