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    • June 14, 2020 11:04 PM EDT
    • Bob Wenger said:

      Ted,

      What issue of GR was that article in?

      Thanks...

      Not sure of the exact issue but the date is 2004 and its plan set 67. Bob cope’s plans are way more detailed if your looking for that. Using these plans it’s easy enough to make the cars with some detail if that works for the modeler. 

    • June 14, 2020 5:53 PM EDT
    • If anyone is interested, I have done a set of drawings based on the Ted Stinson drawings. Mine are much more detailed and provide a suggested parts list. See here : http://www.gscalejunkie.com/GRPS.html

       

      I forgot to mention these are for 1:20.3 Scale

    • June 14, 2020 10:53 AM EDT
    • Those look very nice, Ted.   I like the idea of building up a bunch at once.   (Of course, now you need some lettering!)

    • June 14, 2020 8:16 AM EDT
    • Ted,

      What issue of GR was that article in?

      Thanks...

    • June 13, 2020 4:31 PM EDT
    • Being a modeler myself, great job, I would do the same thing if I wanted a string of cars that look much better then factory builds. 

       

      trainman

    • June 13, 2020 11:58 AM EDT
    • Bought a bunch of trucks, wheel sets, and couplers off of eBay to build some cars. My outdoor layout will have a saw mill and a mine where my shay and climax’s will run but I didn’t have any flat cars for the milled lumber and no gondolas for the ore. I already made a bunch of log cars off of GR magazine plans and I prefer the look of the handmade cars so I dec to use a plan set and make up 4 flats, 3 gondolas. Because I’ve been an RC plane modeler for over 40 years, I’ve got quite a collection of modeling tools and supplies. My dremel table saw is the best TS made in my opinion and ripping 1/2” thick hard wood is easy and precise. I have a box of dimensional bass wood and a box of popular. I happen to have a few 3’ lengths of 1/4x4” boards that were perfect for the main body and then have a bunch of 3/16 and 1/4”sq stock along with other strip wood and planks. For the flats I’ll be using bass wood strips for the deck and the gondolas, the decks will be balsa hardened with CA. The gondola sides are also made from bass wood. 
            I’m not a purist as many are here and it doesn’t bother me if the trucks aren’t right for the model as my railroad will be more for running pleasures that purity. To each their own. The gondolas will have body mounted Bachmann knuckle couplers set at a height to match my new climax. The flats will have truck mounted hook and loops to match the height of my early climax loco which is a lot lower than the new version. Luckily I purchased from Bachmann the last two metal climax replacement trucks they had so it will be up and running again soon. 
             I will be adding Ozarks miniature hand wheels and brake parts. I added the body brace rods per the plans. Still have to build the gondola sides and finish them all off but they are coming along. I made up jigs, cut up all the pieces at once, then assembled all the flats with WP glue and my pin nailer. Used some Rustoleum red oxide primer to paint them and still have some trucks to paint yet. Should be a couple good looking consists.

    • May 31, 2020 11:08 PM EDT
    • Pete Lassen said:

      Far from a trend, if you want the train to move, body mounted trucks seem to be  more of a necessity. Unless you use a string or the 5 finger power plant you are going to need some kind of power ( electric, live steam diesel, gas , nuclear, solar, proton drive) to make the trains move

      Word on the street says Shawn V. uses a string but hides it well

    • May 31, 2020 11:24 AM EDT
    • Fred Mills. said:

      Isn't it rather interesting how "Body Mounted Trucks" are such a successful far/trend; while body mounted couplers always start a debate of some sort...

        I'm very much for body mounting trucks, on railroad cars.  I just don't know how we mounted them in the past.  My feeble mind went blank, when thinking about it...

      I tried coupler mounted trucks but then you must use truck mounted couplers and I don't like the look of them 

       

    • May 31, 2020 10:55 AM EDT
    • Far from a trend, if you want the train to move, body mounted trucks seem to be  more of a necessity. Unless you use a string or the 5 finger power plant you are going to need some kind of power ( electric, live steam diesel, gas , nuclear, solar, proton drive) to make the trains move

    • May 31, 2020 9:13 AM EDT
    • Isn't it rather interesting how "Body Mounted Trucks" are such a successful far/trend; while body mounted couplers always start a debate of some sort...

        I'm very much for body mounting trucks, on railroad cars.  I just don't know how we mounted them in the past.  My feeble mind went blank, when thinking about it...

            Fred Mills

    • May 30, 2020 7:53 AM EDT
    • Mark Hadler said:

      Thanks Pete, but I like the look of body mounted trucks so I'm forced to mutilate.   Also, I kind of enjoy it (the mutilation part).

      Mark, I must agree and I think we all do. But I've yet to mutilate for that look.

    • May 31, 2020 4:38 PM EDT
    • Two strips are overkill, I agree. But I wanted to run on 9v and have it decently lit -- which it barely is. On 12v though, yeah, too bright. I plan on knocking that down with a resistor.

    • May 31, 2020 3:54 PM EDT
    • Pete Lassen said:

      The strip lights are just the long tape you cut to length and solder your wires from the connector to?

      The connector pads are labelled so it is tough to go wrong.

       

       

      Something else I tried on one coach was to cover some of the LEDs. The strips are quite bright - I'm surprised Cliff needed a dual strip! On EBT #5 I covered every other LED. They don't get hot (as long as you keep the voltage down.) The covering was a strip of wood with holes cut for some of the LEDs to shine through.

    • May 31, 2020 3:51 PM EDT
    • Thanks Pete, very cool. 

    • May 31, 2020 11:34 AM EDT
    • Hi Pete,

       

      Yes, you can cut and solder them about every 2 or 3 inches. You feed 12v (max) to them, regardless of cut length. There's a number of colors, and some are remotely controllable. Just look for "LED tape."

       

      https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HSF64JG

       

       

       

       

    • May 31, 2020 11:06 AM EDT
    • The strip lights are just the long tape you cut to length and solder your wires from the connector to?

    • May 29, 2020 3:11 PM EDT
    • Having been blessed with a gorgeously-detailed passenger car built by Bruce Chandler, I'm wanting to see the interior when both on the shelf and the track. The first step was to install LED tape along the ceiling, and connect it to a 9v rechargeable battery pack. That was yesterday; and the battery is for track running.

       

       

      Since I wanted to install this in as non-invasive a way as possible, I just dropped the 9v battery pack in one of the vestibules (the 12v version didn't fit, and I didn't want to harm the walls). 

       

      For shelf lighting,  I didn't want to mess with switches. So today I received a small 12v infrared sensor, and hooked it up to a 12v wall wart and matching connector to the LED tape. Here's the setup, pretty simple.

       

       

      To switch back to battery, you just unplug the sensor cable and plug in the battery cable. The sensor is hidden beneath a shelf, and the wires just go behind everything. 

       

       

       

      I got the sensor here. It's 12-24vdc in, and when triggered, sends the same voltage out. The on-time is adjustable from 1 to 10 minutes. 

       

      This is right outside my basement office. So now whenever I walk to the fridge or the bathroom, I get to see Albert and his travel mates!

       

      Thanks again Bruce!

      Cliff

       

    • May 29, 2020 3:11 PM EDT
    • Sorrier, another dupe post.