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    • July 3, 2020 4:39 PM EDT
    • Bruce Chandler said:
      John Caughey said:
      Rick Marty said:

      Cliff, even with all that calculating, you know it won't be enough

      Yep! An 80 pound rule of thumb, with 60 pound bags. Even your grandmother can see through that!

      Maybe it's kind of like the "feels like" temperature we get from the weather service: when you're older, the 60 pound bags FEEL like they weigh 80 pounds. 

       

      Now THAT is a piece of truth. Especially when you add a gallon of water to it.

    • July 3, 2020 4:33 PM EDT
    • Dennis Rayon said:

      Wow Cliff, you are one gutsy type guy tackling this in the heat of summer. But we all know you are a superman type guy. 

      Thanks for sharing

      Dennis

       

      Thanks Dennis!

      But, if this short chubby 60-year-old with a bad back can do it, anyone can, haha!

      Thanks for the kind comments though, I was thinking of you a lot today, and your concrete mountain efforts over the years, as you might imagine.

       

       

       

       

    • July 3, 2020 4:29 PM EDT
    • John Caughey said:
      Rick Marty said:

      Cliff, even with all that calculating, you know it won't be enough

      Yep! An 80 pound rule of thumb, with 60 pound bags. Even your grandmother can see through that!

       

      OK, Eagle Eye.... ,  I did factor up for that.   

    • July 3, 2020 3:32 PM EDT
    • The problem with rotating barrel mixers, is with cement to work properly it needs more water, if you mix mortar thin enough to plop in the mixer it is way to thin for mortar.

      You need a mortar mixer or a wheel barrel and Mud hoe or lately, a handheld 2 beeter  mixer and a cattle watering rubber trough works great. The mixers sale around 125-150 dollars.

      Personally I built a nice 80lb paddle mixer, to where the wheel barrel rolls under it for dumping, a 2 wheel, wheel barrel holds 3 bags or 240 lbs. You can't use it up in a hot day, I only do 2 sacks on a hot day, then mix another batch. I have mixed over 20,000 lbs with mine. 

    • July 3, 2020 10:24 AM EDT
    • You're going to hand mix all that.  I'd be dead before it cured

       

      I don't remember which project was I wanted it for, but some years back I bought a 160# mixer from Home Depot.  Works great for concrete, mortar and sand mix - not so much...

    • July 3, 2020 10:23 AM EDT
    • John Caughey said:
      Rick Marty said:

      Cliff, even with all that calculating, you know it won't be enough

      Yep! An 80 pound rule of thumb, with 60 pound bags. Even your grandmother can see through that!

      Maybe it's kind of like the "feels like" temperature we get from the weather service: when you're older, the 60 pound bags FEEL like they weigh 80 pounds. 

    • July 3, 2020 10:12 AM EDT
    • Wow Cliff, you are one gutsy type guy tackling this in the heat of summer. But we all know you are a superman type guy. 

      Thanks for sharing

      Dennis

    • July 2, 2020 8:32 PM EDT
    • Rick Marty said:

      Cliff, even with all that calculating, you know it won't be enough

      Yep! An 80 pound rule of thumb, with 60 pound bags. Even your grandmother can see through that!

    • July 2, 2020 6:43 PM EDT
    • I ain't helping cut it up when your dead!

    • July 2, 2020 6:42 PM EDT
    • Cliff, even with all that calculating, you know it won't be enough

    • July 3, 2020 2:03 PM EDT
    • A wonderful build and final model. Great job as usual, Rick.

    • July 2, 2020 7:45 PM EDT
    • Rooster,

      The "compressor" is an air brake cylinder used to raise and lower the ice cutting blade, that's that big iron thing on the front.

      They used chains to hook the hinged blade to the air cylinder arm to raise it off the rails when moving and not plowing.  For plowing the

      blade was dropped and locked in place and the chains removed.

      You can drop back a few posts for pictures that more clearly show the blade in the raised and lowered position.

       

      If Oregon gets a record snow fall this winter it is pretty unlikely that you are going to see video of anything but smoke from my wood stove

    • July 2, 2020 7:21 PM EDT
    • Whats the compressor for or is it a compressor ?

       

      Oregon is gonna get a record snowfall this year and I personally want to see video of the new plow and flanger working it!

    • July 2, 2020 7:10 PM EDT
    • Finally ordered up lettering for several cars from Stan and now the plow and flanger are really finished.

       

      Here they are sitting on the siding in the mountain town of Hyampom waiting for the call.

       

       

       

      I decided to  go with the paint over look for the lettering, in other words I took the lazy way out.

      My story is that the Shasta Pacific bought this used equipment from the McCloud River RR, put narrow gauge trucks under them, painted over 

      the McCloud markings and lettered them for the new home road, too cheap to repaint the whole cars

      Project complete!

    • July 3, 2020 12:11 PM EDT
    • That's how I understood it when I read it again. So yes, the new material will hold the curve so long as you keep the blocks separating the two ladder rails in place.  I have formed mine on the ground, then lifted it for cleaning and painting before placing permanently...

    • July 3, 2020 11:06 AM EDT
    • Thanks for replying back to my post.  And I'm appreciative of your suggestions.

       

      I'm sorry if my original question was confusing to you.  For clarity...the original ladder section that was eventually replaced by the original trestle was made of vinyl strips and blocks purchased at HD.  It was exposed to the elements for about 2 years before I built the trestle.   When I finally cut that section of ladder out it retained its shape and made a perfect template for the trestle bents.  In other words I was able to put the bents under it and nail the side braces.  When completed my son and I simply lifted the whole trestle up and fit like a glove.  I am now rebuilding the trestle completely from scratch with fresh everything.  I'd like to install the same vinyl material as a temporary ladder system but will only have it in place for the most a day.  So my question is...since this vinyl is fresh will it retain it's shape when cut like the more weathered original...from what a few of you are saying it sounds like yes but with a little flex.  This makes total sense since the combination of side strips and the blocks will allow for that..

      I hope this clears up the original question!

      As an aside and perhaps a future post will be how to handle the new trestle with the wider curve butting up against a lower part of the mainline...I think I'll have to be somewhat creative.

      Richard

    • July 3, 2020 11:06 AM EDT
    • Thanks for replying back to my post.  And I'm appreciative of your suggestions.

       

      I'm sorry if my original question was confusing to you.  For clarity...the original ladder section that was eventually replaced by the original trestle was made of vinyl strips and blocks purchased at HD.  It was exposed to the elements for about 2 years before I built the trestle.   When I finally cut that section of ladder out it retained its shape and made a perfect template for the trestle bents.  In other words I was able to put the bents under it and nail the side braces.  When completed my son and I simply lifted the whole trestle up and fit like a glove.  I am now rebuilding the trestle completely from scratch with fresh everything.  I'd like to install the same vinyl material as a temporary ladder system but will only have it in place for the most a day.  So my question is...since this vinyl is fresh will it retain it's shape when cut like the more weathered original...from what a few of you are saying it sounds like yes but with a little flex.  This makes total sense since the combination of side strips and the blocks will allow for that..

      I hope this clears up the original question!

      As an aside and perhaps a future post will be how to handle the new trestle with the wider curve butting up against a lower part of the mainline...I think I'll have to be somewhat creative.

      Richard

    • July 3, 2020 11:06 AM EDT
    • Thanks for replying back to my post.  And I'm appreciative of your suggestions.

       

      I'm sorry if my original question was confusing to you.  For clarity...the original ladder section that was eventually replaced by the original trestle was made of vinyl strips and blocks purchased at HD.  It was exposed to the elements for about 2 years before I built the trestle.   When I finally cut that section of ladder out it retained its shape and made a perfect template for the trestle bents.  In other words I was able to put the bents under it and nail the side braces.  When completed my son and I simply lifted the whole trestle up and fit like a glove.  I am now rebuilding the trestle completely from scratch with fresh everything.  I'd like to install the same vinyl material as a temporary ladder system but will only have it in place for the most a day.  So my question is...since this vinyl is fresh will it retain it's shape when cut like the more weathered original...from what a few of you are saying it sounds like yes but with a little flex.  This makes total sense since the combination of side strips and the blocks will allow for that..

      I hope this clears up the original question!

      As an aside and perhaps a future post will be how to handle the new trestle with the wider curve butting up against a lower part of the mainline...I think I'll have to be somewhat creative.

      Richard

    • July 3, 2020 10:43 AM EDT
    • OK. I don't know if anybody really understood the question. It took me a couple of reads to get it.  My answer is Yes, with a caveat...

       

      Make sure you have a connector block on both sides of each cut when you take the saw to it, and several blocks in the curve.  It is the blocks that hold the ladder in a curve. Once you remove the blocks, the ladder will relax some, but will retain some of the curve. It could be re-used as David states, and as individual strips will conform to a new curve.

    • July 2, 2020 7:17 PM EDT
    • Richard Mynderup said:

      I am rebuilding my trestle so it has a more sweeping curve than the original.  When I made my first trestle I was pleased to find the original ladder system where the trestle was to be place retained the curve which allowed me to recreate the track plan much more easily.  I recognize that the ladder was exposed to the elements for about two years which might have hardened the vinyl strips...but for my new trestle do you think if I created another ladder system first then cut it out...would it retain the shape I desire or would it straighten out once the tension is relieved...weird question I know.

       

      Thanks,

      Richard

       

      Not a weird question Richard. Ken reused some of the composite ladder I had no use for on my RR and donated to him. It had been outside for (thinking) 10yrs ? Still works for him ....guess it all depends on the material originally used.