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    • April 20, 2019 5:33 PM EDT
    • After the demise of Northwest Precision Lumber, I've been gradually building up my capabilities of ripping scale lumber, mainly using eastern cedar from Michael... the guy who shows up at train shows... Sorry, I've no contact info, but he doesn't do mail order. 

       

      Anyway, I was glad to see another source for western red cedar, which is darker, and maybe tighter-grained. Here's his "store", 

       

      https://www.ebay.com/sch/smokeysjoe/m.html?_nkw=

       

      I was short of larger cedar that I could rip down to 3/8 x 11/16. So yesterday (Friday) I asked this seller (Jim). He replied with an ebay offer this morning, $14 for 8 feet of the size I need, includes shipping. Went out today, and I'll get it Wednesday. I call that service!

       

      When I receive the wood, I'll post on its accuracy, grain, finish, etc. 

       

      ===>Cliffy

    • April 20, 2019 1:36 PM EDT
    • Dan,

      In 7/8 scale the tool shed isn't much bigger than an average modern garden shed. The dude on the porch is 6' tall.

      I would assume it would be lifted by log loader or car mounted derrick. (don't have one yet in 7/8") 

       

      I realized I have to put a link pocket on the back side of the porches, if I want to tow a string back to the yards.

    • April 20, 2019 12:48 PM EDT
    • John, what would be the prototypical method for setting the tool shed off the trucks?  Crane? manpower?, etc.....

    • April 20, 2019 10:46 AM EDT
    • Devon Sinsley said:

      Those are cool john. The articulated tool car is a clever idea. One that could come in handy for building the cars for my tight curves indoors. 

       

       

       

       

      Thanks, Devon.

      I didn't plan on making it with the porches "articulated" until I started to build it. It was only going to have the usual pair of fixed journals.

      I built another shed earlier and it has fixed axles. Seems to run on my layout OK.

      I want to try it on some tight radii one day.

      I might build a few more different shacks and keep the porch/trucks on a siding like a bunch of logging disconnects.

    • April 19, 2019 10:10 PM EDT
    • Simple, rustic, practical, useful.  What more could one ask for?  Great builds, John.

    • April 19, 2019 5:52 PM EDT
    • Those are cool john. The articulated tool car is a clever idea. One that could come in handy for building the cars for my tight curves indoors. 

    • April 19, 2019 11:24 AM EDT
    • I just put the finishing touches on a pair of shacks/caboose/work cars.

      For fun, I built one the usual way, from the bottom to the roof. That would be the little red logger bobber.

      The tool shack, I built up modular, to see how that would work. The tool shack is articulated for sharp curves and can be lifted off the trucks and

      left somewhere to be used by the crew.

       

      First is the LogBob.

       

       

       

       

       

      And the tool shack.

       

       

       

       

    • April 20, 2019 10:57 AM EDT
    • That last photo looks terrific. 

      Great job, keep on bashing!

      John R.

    • April 20, 2019 8:01 AM EDT
    • Thank you, Shane. it's been a fun project.

       

      Okay, now it's starting to all come together:

      The reflectors are 3M red reflecting tape, made with my wife's hole punch. Builder's plates are from Microscale and placed on aluminum plates. Steps and journal box lids  have been trimmed with silver paint.

      Next up: stripes and more lettering.

      Cheers,

      Matt

    • April 19, 2019 6:21 PM EDT
    • Looking good Matt.

       

      Shane

       

    • April 20, 2019 8:33 AM EDT
    • Thanks very much Devon! Yeah, the car had a lot of gingerbread on it; I kept finding another piece of hardware to account for, it seemed endless! 

       

      Here's a couple proto shots by my friend Mike Collins, who's probably the leading expert on this car (and lots of other V&T subjects).

       

       

    • April 19, 2019 5:56 PM EDT
    • If this build even comes close to the most excellent computer model it will be a head turner. I cant believe the details you put into the computer model. I love all the fiddly stuff this car has on it. 

    • April 17, 2019 11:06 PM EDT
    • Those lifting weights at the hook are pretty impressive for a hand winch. Of course ever time you wrap a block you double your lifting/pull capacity.

      Looks like a heck of a fun project and is historically meaningful.  Keep us posted. 

    • April 17, 2019 10:54 PM EDT
    • Rick Marty said:

      Cliff,

      Not only a 2 man drive system but it looks like a 2 speed winch as well.

      Correct me if I am wrong but it looks like the handle shaft is made to slide over; it is shown in the gear reduction mode in the picture, if you slide the handles over and lock them in you would be in direct drive to the drum gear. I suppose the change would be for the amount of weight you were trying to lift.  For instance a truck would weigh in around 5-6 K, that would take some pretty serious hand cranking.

       

      Holed it in one, thanks Rick! Here's a summary of some calcs I did a couple months ago. The thing needed to pick up an end of a typical box car (empty) and set it back on the rails. And in the Whispering Smith movie, that's what it was in the act of doing. That was with the mini steam engine powering it, but before then (when in V&T service) two men could have done it. 

       

       

      BTW, I'm not sure what diameter of wire rope was used here, but I've been assuming 1/2" -ish. 10 tons would have been nearing the limit of even modern 1/2" rope, which has a min working force of 10.7-11.5 (depending on the winding). Then there are the limits of bearings, fasteners, cable clamps, etc. Point being, spreadsheets are one thing, reality and common sense is another. I doubt they'd have cranked it to 10 tons. But unfortunately, I haven't found any manufacturer's ratings. Though the identical mechanism is shown in Fig 77 of Car Builders Dictionary (1888), they don't cite a capacity. If anyone comes across more info, I'd be grateful to have it.

       

       

       

      Cliff

       

       

       

    • April 17, 2019 8:21 PM EDT
    • Cliff,

      Not only a 2 man drive system but it looks like a 2 speed winch as well.

      Correct me if I am wrong but it looks like the handle shaft is made to slide over; it is shown in the gear reduction mode in the picture, if you slide the handles over and lock them in you would be in direct drive to the drum gear. I suppose the change would be for the amount of weight you were trying to lift.  For instance a truck would weigh in around 5-6 K, that would take some pretty serious hand cranking.

    • April 19, 2019 12:23 AM EDT
    • John Bouck said:

      Here's the one I built a few years ago.

       

      And of course John yours is a work of art. Was finally nice to put a face to the name and meet you in person.

    • April 19, 2019 12:19 AM EDT
    • Jim,

      This is great. I was going to attempt a McGiffert loader at one time

       

      I love the idea of pulling the empty cars through the loader as they are then loaded. But this is just to big a challenge that I really don't want to take the tie to tackle. So then I was thinking a spar loader as you were. But now this idea is easy to build and has that same concept as the McGiffert only not as mobile which for my layout plan wouldn't be necessary anyway. So this is a good thread. Now I have two of your projects to steal.

    • April 18, 2019 10:31 PM EDT
    • Dan Hilyer said:

      Nice job on the details, Devon. I really like the bench and table. 

      I am going to make a passed out drunk figure of my brother-in-law and put him on the bench. Which is so NOT the real him. I love how the lantern on the table came out. These are some crazy small LEDs from Lighthouse LED. They are smaller than the head of a sewing pin by at least half. Come pre-wired with a resistor so they will run anywhere from 6v to over 15v. When I get back to the GP9 build I am going to use them for working step lights.

    • April 18, 2019 10:22 PM EDT
    • Nice job on the details, Devon. I really like the bench and table. 

    • April 18, 2019 10:08 PM EDT
    • Well first off sorry for the deleted pics. I don't know what I did here is were it is and I added back a couple others. So here is the prototype.

       

      And here is my rendition so far.

       

       

      And the first of the lights. A lantern that I drilled and put a very itty bitty LED in.

       

       

      And the details

       

      I still have some tools to make, add the doors, and a couple interior lights.